1. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

  2. Clouds Givemethewillies

    Clouds Givemethewillies Active Member

    I'm struggling with the dates 1945 and 2100.
     
  3. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    Those are times.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  4. Clouds Givemethewillies

    Clouds Givemethewillies Active Member

    Computers!
     
  5. Pabby1980

    Pabby1980 New Member

    Screenshot_2017-09-07-23-41-52.
    Of course I do.

    To be honest this feels ridiculous even having to show the ticket...as if some flat earther is going to all of a sudden see the light because of an e ticket, and not just shout "photoshop" or "it'll get cancelled"....but regardless, there it is.
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
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  6. Z.W. Wolf

    Z.W. Wolf Active Member

    Your point is not clear... but you might be referring to a seeming problem with compass direction during the flight Max Igan took? If so, that is explained here: https://www.metabunk.org/debunking-flat-earth-with-the-southern-hemisphere.t7693/#post-184906

    Be sure you understand magnetic declination.
     
  7. Amber Robot

    Amber Robot Member

    After you board the plane, the flight crew will have to induct you into the global conspiracy, explain to you that the flight is going to take a lot longer than originally planned, and tell you that you'll never be able to tell anyone about it. Would you like some peanuts with that?
     
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  8. Buzzerb

    Buzzerb New Member

    I wouldn't joke about it. Some people seem to think secrets involving millions of people are perfectly ordinary. Did we ever get a response from the original FE?
     
  9. DJC

    DJC Member

    What secrets involving millions of people ......why would you need millions of people ...?
     
  10. Whitebeard

    Whitebeard Senior Member

    Every airline pilot and crew, every ships master and crew, those involved in the space programme, every scientist involved in antarctic research, every cartographer, geographer, oceanographer... and not just now, but going back to the time of Captain Cook in not earlier...
     
  11. Landru

    Landru Moderator Staff Member

    Every Volvo ocean racer. Everyone who has sailed the southern ocean
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  12. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    Everyone involved with flights there, and across it, including the two transpolar circumnavigations. And all the thousands of people who work there every year. All the explorers and expeditions. Ranulph Fiennes and Jon Johanson and Felicity Aston and Henry Worsley. Not to mention all the members of the enormous army that flat earthers fantasise are guarding it - plus their families, the people that presumably ship them there, everyone involved in the manufacture of their equipment and uniforms, and all the cooks and office workers, and...

    The list goes on, and on, and on...
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  13. Hevach

    Hevach Senior Member

    Antarctica has a permanent population of about 1,000 and runs over 4,000 during the summer months. And it's not always the same 4,000, tens of thousands of people have been to Antarctica, and hundreds of thousands have been either on waters or in the air nearby. So there's quite a few thousands there.

    Let's not forget that you can just slap down some money and buy a trip to several of the outlying stations like McMurdo. Only a few hundred people have done this, but it's something anyone can do. Just googling Trip to Antarcita I found a half dozen travel agents in the US who have special landed packages, and virtually every cruise line has a route that goes within sight of the ice.

    There's also an immense fishing industry in Antarctic waters, including one of the largest illegal fishing industries and the bulk of the world's remaining whaling.
     
  14. DJC

    DJC Member

    you cant go very far into antarctica maybe to the edges ..its minus 65C.. why are there no flight routes over antarctica why arent the weather conditons the same as the north pole why are there only a handful of plants or animals there as apposed to the north pole ....there are lots of questions its not that easy
     
  15. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    All your questions have answers you could find with a little Googling.
     
  16. Hevach

    Hevach Senior Member

    Summer tempratures are substantially higher than -65C, you only really get those kinds of temperatures in the elevated eastern inland areas. McMurdo has summer temperatures of -2C to -26C, and the pole itself is only about ten degrees colder in the summer. There's even a steam tent there, and if you visit you can get inducted into an elite club of people who have sat in it at its highest setting, then run out naked, rounded the pole, and returned. Nobody's had a heart attack yet, but it's not recommended for anyone with a history of heart problems.

    For the low, low price of $50,000 per person, you can stay at Union Glacier and do a flyover of the pole.

    https://www.polar-quest.com/trips/antarctica/fly-to-the-south-pole-2017


    Going there in person is also an option, but it's much more expensive and guides won't even take you unless you're a seriously experienced adventurer, because they're not dragging some pampered trust fund kid through hundreds of miles of treacherous ice.

    http://www.icetrek.com/join-a-trip/south-pole-and-antarctica
     
  17. DJC

    DJC Member

    Maybe my google is a bit different then yours ....this is what i got
    The average high temperature for the year in Antarctica is about -49 degrees F, while the average low temperature for the continent is about -56 degrees F.

    as far as flights go

    an Am flight 50, using a Boeing 747SP, also flew over both poles. No scheduled commercial flights over fly the South Pole since there are no great circle routes in use which do so. Flights from New Zealand to South Africa would fly over Antarctica but no airline currently flies that route.Dec 15, 2016

    as far as plants and animals go
    Screen Shot 2017-09-10 at 8.03.30 PM.


    there is a big difference in making it sound easy to go to antarctica and run across to the south pole ..but again we will have to take someone else's word for it since we have never been and i dont plan on it
     
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    • Disagree Disagree x 1
  18. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    One is a large continent covered with ice, surrounded by open ocean. The other is mostly open ocean, ringed by warmer lands. Radically different situations.

    But we are getting rather off topic here.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
  19. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    In addition to earlier points, Antarctica also has a much higher average elevation (+7500ft).
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
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  20. Hevach

    Hevach Senior Member

    And as for life, the Arctic is connected to Asia and North America, large continents that have been recently connected. Antarctica has been an isolated island ecosystem since the last supercontinent broke up, like Australia. We know rather little about its previous inhabitants, most of its fossil record buried under ice and possibly much of it eroded away. However, like Australia it very well could have been populated by throwbacks that were replaced by new types in most of the world. This doesn't mean it's life was less evolved than most of the world, evolution doesn't work that way. But it does mean it has less material to work with and can leave the entire ecosystem in a dead end if the climate change, even as slowly as continental drift causes.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  21. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer Moderator Staff Member

    LATAM has just launched direct flights from Melbourne to Santiago:

    upload_2017-10-6_15-46-4.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
  22. Ranon151

    Ranon151 New Member

    Here's what the Melborune -> Santiago route would look like on the Flat Earth, using the Metabunk simulator: Screen Shot 2017-10-06 at 11.19.45 AM.

    The straight route (red line) would be over 17000 miles. Covering that distance in 14 hours would require a plane to go nearly twice the speed of sound. On the globe model, the great circle distance is only 6300 miles, comfortably reached with speeds of about 500 mph.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  23. DJC

    DJC Member

    how fast can a plane fly ? it would have to be doing 1200 mph ...to make that flight ..is it possible or not?
     
  24. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    No.
     
  25. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    Not in the planes they use. Concord had a top speed of 1354mph, however a 747 goes to 614, A380 goes to 634.

    So it's twice as fast as any of the planes that fly those routes.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  26. Landru

    Landru Moderator Staff Member

    Not to mention range.
     
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  27. Ranon151

    Ranon151 New Member

    Furthermore, in order to pull off the direct route it would mean the plane would travel in a completely different direction than the Great Circle route, going northwards over the Americas. This could easily be verified by the passengers, who would see the plane going over areas like the New Mexico desert that clearly should not be there in the polar route.

    If instead, the plane traveled through the Great Circle Route, that would be a staggering 26,000 miles, or upwards of 1800 mph. That's faster than an F-22.
     
  28. Landru

    Landru Moderator Staff Member

    Which doesn't have that range.
     
  29. DJC

    DJC Member

    Can someone take that flight with a gps or something to prove the route ..?
     
  30. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    Perhaps you are due for a vacation.......?
     
  31. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    If someone took a GPS on the plane, what would they do with it?

    Maybe you can illustrate step-by-step what you think they should do, and why.
     
  32. DJC

    DJC Member

    I wouldn't know how to do this ...but i am going to Phuket in January so Im willing to fly to Oz from there and back to Santiago or start in chile ...ill figure it out ...let me know what you guys come up with ..i know max Igan did something similar ....I think Mick didn't agree with it ..so it has to be something that cant be argued ..not to mention its going to be some time and money .im not doing it twice .
     
  33. Ranon151

    Ranon151 New Member

  34. DJC

    DJC Member

  35. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    Max Igan didn't account for magnetic declination. That would be one thing, for starters.
     
  36. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer Moderator Staff Member

    I don't understand what you mean here? The flight does follow fairly close to the Great Circle route – not exactly because as explained by @TWCobra earlier there is a limit to how far south it is allowed to fly.
     
  37. Trailblazer

    Trailblazer Moderator Staff Member

    GPS units can record a track quite easily. You can do the same with smartphone apps - I regularly use them to track bike rides etc.

    Previously GPS didn't work on iPhones when they were in flight mode, so you couldn't do this on a plane, but nowadays you can use it in flight perfectly well.

    Likewise most modern cameras and phones record the GPS co-ordinates when you take a photo, so you can take photos while you fly and the location will be recorded.
     
  38. Z.W. Wolf

    Z.W. Wolf Active Member

    He means if they simulated the great circle route on a FE, so that the plane wouldn't pass over California and the Yucatan Peninsula along the way.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  39. Z.W. Wolf

    Z.W. Wolf Active Member

  40. Rory

    Rory Senior Member

    Sh. You're doing his work for him. ;)

    The point of the question is to see if DJC can devise a methodology for his idea, covering all the steps from: (1) human boards this flight with a GPS device; to (n) route is proved to the complete satisfaction of denialists on an internet forum.

    Though...
    Does this mean you now accept the validity of the route, and the testimony and evidence of @TWCobra, the pilot who has flown and documented it?