Jesse Michel's youtube documentary on David Grusch

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I have not seen all of it or paid attention to it in full detail. I'm not very up to date with the whole situation either and am not up to date about what's been told or not before. I felt I've heard some fragments of what's being told elsewhere from other people but was not sure. However it did seem to give me some sense of David's character and personality.

Overall it felt to me like it got progressively more speculative and fringe which I thought was a little bit surprising. The documentary felt like all the stories we heard were true, and they're trying to speculate about and rationalize all of it leaving nothing behind.
 
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This is a long video. When commenting on it please try to include a quote, a timestamp to the relecant section, and ideally hyperlink the timestamp to the video.

I'm only 35 minutes in. It's odd. The very first thing that leaps out is why the weird thumbnail. It seems (with the quote) designed to make Grusch look somewhat unhinged. But Michels also seems to want to promote UFO mythology as real. Maybe the rest of the video will reveal more.
 
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I just cannot set myself to watch it longer than 10 minutes. It is just repeating everything, but packaged in a way to make it look like there is no discussion.
 
This is a long video. When commenting on it please try to include a timestarmp to the relecant section, and ideally hyperlink the timestamp to the video.

I'm only 35 minutes in. It's odd. The very first thing that leaps out is why the weird thumbnail. It seems (with the quote) designed to make Grusch look somewhat unhinged. But Michels also seems to want to promote UFO mythology as real. Maybe the rest of the video will reveal more.
That's just the standard Youtube "surprised face" that every YT thumbnail apparently has to have to get clicks these days.

here's potentially unintentional example:

1694419556844.png


If you google "Youtube Surprised Face" you'll find all sorts of discussion of it, there's no authoritative source though.

Here's it's a bit weird, it's probably not meant by the creator to discredit Grusch, although to older/more sober people it might, because it does put this video firmly into Youtube clickbait territory, but it is firmly a "Done Thing" on the internet.

Although really it should be the interviewers face that's "surprised" so it's a little more odd.

I think they did it with little thought as to how it might look because they are just deep into YT current "standards."
 
This is a long video. When commenting on it please try to include a timestarmp to the relecant section, and ideally hyperlink the timestamp to the video.
I removed the comments from OP, I originally just wanted to point out things the video itself was going into and not specifically David. It's a little hard to figure out what David thinks vs what Jesse seems to be trying to push when I rewatch the parts mentioned.

Perhaps the most surprising thing to me that was entertained in the video was that time distortion and "heightened states of consciousness" could explain some observations.


Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kRO5jOa06Qw&t=4877s
Source: https://youtu.be/kRO5jOa06Qw?t=4747
Source: https://youtu.be/kRO5jOa06Qw?t=5181


I really struggled to find the "heightened states of consciousness" quote manually, so I used python and whisperer to transcribe the entire video and was able to find it in the transcription instead.

You can find the entire transcription here:
Source: https://gist.github.com/CapsAdmin/e6a7954c9810a61eee64e0c1f96a2712
 
Has anyone asked Grusch about Die Glocke? I wonder if with a gentle push he'd relate that to the 1933 Mussolini UFO, which many UFOlogists do.
Edit: My apologies, Die Glocke is an alleged experimental Nazi device in the shape of a bell with alleged time-travel and levitation powers, first appearing in the early 2000s by a Polish journalist named Igor Witkowski and making frequent appearances in writings relating to Nazi secrets and UFOs since then.
 
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Has anyone asked Grusch about Die Glocke? I wonder if with a gentle push he'd relate that to the 1933 Mussolini UFO, which many UFOlogists do.

We have a "no click" policy here - if it's worth referring to the existence of a resource elsewhere, it's worth actually including the most pertinent bits of what's in that other resource. Don't make others have to click through to find out whether it was worth reading or not.

External Quote:
Die Glocke (German: [diː ˈɡlɔkə], "The Bell") was a purported top-secret scientific technological device, secret weapon, or Wunderwaffe developed in the 1940s in Nazi Germany. First described by Polish journalist and author Igor Witkowski. in Prawda o Wunderwaffe (2000), it was later popularized by military journalist and author Nick Cook, who associated it with Nazi occultism, antigravity, and free energy suppression research. Mainstream reviewers have criticized claims about Die Glocke as being pseudoscientific, recycled rumors, and a hoax. Die Glocke and other alleged Nazi "miracle weapons" have been dramatized in video games, television shows, and novels.
 


I have not seen all of it or paid attention to it in full detail. I'm not very up to date with the whole situation either and am not up to date about what's been told or not before. I felt I've heard some fragments of what's being told elsewhere from other people but was not sure. However it did seem to give me some sense of David's character and personality.

Overall it felt to me like it got progressively more speculative and fringe which I thought was a little bit surprising. The documentary felt like all the stories we heard were true, and they're trying to speculate about and rationalize all of it leaving nothing behind.

I won't have two hours to watch this for the next couple weeks, but do we know when this interview was done? Was it done before or after the July hearing? Does Grusch address his mental illness issues and commitment to a mental health facility in the interview?

Thanks
 
I won't have two hours to watch this for the next couple weeks, but do we know when this interview was done? Was it done before or after the July hearing? Does Grusch address his mental illness issues and commitment to a mental health facility in the interview?

Thanks

Most of the interview appears to have happened a day or two after the hearings.

They only briefly mention the mental health stuff towards the end though don't go into much detail (not that there's much to go into anyway). Grusch mentions having received treatment for his PTSD and having been surprised by how effective he found EMDR and HRV breathwork for his PTSD symptoms.

Timestamp is 1:33:48
Right before that part he also talks about his autism diagnosis and having only learned that he was autistic in his 30's.
 
Most of the interview appears to have happened a day or two after the hearings.

They only briefly mention the mental health stuff towards the end though don't go into much detail (not that there's much to go into anyway). Grusch mentions having received treatment for his PTSD and having been surprised by how effective he found EMDR and HRV breathwork for his PTSD symptoms.

Timestamp is 1:33:48
Right before that part he also talks about his autism diagnosis and having only learned that he was autistic in his 30's.
Thanks. So it sounds like the interview was after the hearing, but before the "Intercept" article broke the story about his mental health issues.
 
Was he mentally ill or did he suffer from PTSD and a bout with depression?

Id hate to perpetuate derogatory language if we don't have to.

Mentally ill is can feel derogatory and not the best way to refer to PTSD or depression IMO.
 
Was he mentally ill or did he suffer from PTSD and a bout with depression?

Id hate to perpetuate derogatory language if we don't have to.

Mentally ill is can feel derogatory and not the best way to refer to PTSD or depression IMO.
PTSD and depression are both mental illnesses.

External Quote:
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness.
https://www.rethink.org/advice-and-... is a mental illness,delay of weeks or months.

External Quote:
Depression is a disorder of the brain. It is a serious mental illness that is more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days.
https://www.samhsa.gov/mental-healt... disorder of,can interfere with everyday life.
 
Im aware of how the words share commonalities, but calling someone mentally ill who has depression, or PTSD can sound loaded, the same as like using a wacky picture in a thumbnail can, it just feels in bad taste. Just mentioning this because language matters.

If someone called me "seriously mentally ill" becuase I've dealt with depression, I'd resent that take.
 
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Im aware of how the words share commonalities, but calling someone mentally ill who has depression, or PTSD can sound loaded, the same as like using a wacky picture, it just feels in bad taste. Just mentioning this because language matters.
And speaking as someone who lost a brother to his mental illnesses, it's people like you who stigmatize those who suffer from these illnesses. Acting as if being so affected is shameful, or otherwise something to hide by trying to find ways to avoid calling these disorders exactly what they are, is reprehensible.
 
That's just a common trend for every video. Weird thumbnails get more views apparently

Why does the creator of the video look so rational tho...

trying to find ways to avoid calling these disorders exactly what they are, is reprehensible.

I am sorry for your loss but context matters and in the context of a whistleblower speaking about UFOs calling him the umbrella term for schtizophranitc or suffering from psychosis, because he had PTSD and depression caused by his job, I believe is doing exactly that.

The stigma in this context are people calling conspiracy theorists, or UFO believers mentally ill.
 
Listening while I workout so I'll get a good hour of this interview but it's tough. Basically nothing new so far. Just repeating claims of how he was told things by others.

He still hasn't looked up the definition for "biologics" apparently.
 
Alright I quit around 30 minutes. The video is a random collection of speculation. Like somehow speculating a connection to the Manhattan project, meaningless discussions on evolution. Ariel school. Yadda yadda yadda
 
Sorry I didn't catch the timestamp, nor can I remember the exact words to find in CapsAdmin's excellent transcript (post #5) but Grusch made an interesting admission about the DOPSR approval.

When asked why he could say that the USA has retrieved crashed aliens but can't say how many, it was because he didn't add that level of detail to his DOPSR request.

Also interesting to see Grusch say the reason he got approval to discuss alien retrievals was because if the DOPSR was declined, then that would be proof that the alien retrievals were classified, and therefor real, and that would be something Grusch could have published to support his claims.

(1111 seconds) Catch 22 because so they'd have to self identify and highlight their concerns
If it got redacted like that and it cited what organization and what security reason it is,
I would just publish that.


I have no idea how the DOPSR process works but I find it difficult to believe that it has a glaring loophole like this.

Of course there is a logical reason why he was approved to speak about alien retrievals - because they don't exist and there is no classified program.
 
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Why does the creator of the video look so rational tho...



I am sorry for your loss but context matters and in the context of a whistleblower speaking about UFOs calling him the umbrella term for schtizophranitc or suffering from psychosis, because he had PTSD and depression caused by his job, I believe is doing exactly that.

The stigma in this context are people calling conspiracy theorists, or UFO believers mentally ill.
Please show me where I called anyone mentally ill because he/she is a "UFO believer."

Grusch is an individual who was diagnosed with, but apparently (and thankfully) successfully treated for, mental illness; who happens to believe the UFO claims he's made. Those diagnoses would not have been any different if he hadn't believed and came forth with those claims.

Again, I think it's reprehensible you find it necessary to stigmatize a proud American veteran by trying to fast talk mental illness as something to deny, hide or be ashamed of. If there's any shame in this whole saga, it's on the likes of Coulthart, Knapp, Corbell et.al. who took advantage of Grusch. They hung the guy out to dry, but not before getting their own names and faces in the news. They couldn't have bought that kind of self-serving exposure/publicity.
 
Sorry I didn't catch the timestamp, nor can I remember the exact words to find in CapsAdmin's excellent transcript (post #5) but Grusch made an interesting admission about the DOPSR approval.

When asked why he could say that the USA has retrieved crashed aliens but can't say how many, it was because he didn't add that level of detail to his DOPSR request.

Also interesting to see Grusch say the reason he got approval to discuss alien retrievals was because if the DOPSR was declined, then that would be proof that the alien retrievals were classified, and therefor real, and that would be something Grusch could have published to support his claims.

(1111 seconds) Catch 22 because so they'd have to self identify and highlight their concerns
If it got redacted like that and it cited what organization and what security reason it is,
I would just publish that.


I have no idea how the DOPSR process works but I find it difficult to believe that it has a glaring loophole like this.

Of course there is a logical reason why he was approved to speak about alien retrievals - because they don't exist and there is no classified program.

Not so much that it'd be proof the claims are true, but per the DOPSR process they would have to cite which specific agency objected to which specific claims in the DOPSR form. He then stated that this would be a catch-22 for them, and that he'd then be free to release the actual DOPSR request with the requested ommissions as well as citations from the agencies that objected to them to the public to make of that what they will.

I've heard of this strategy elsewhere, and it is in fact hard to see how it could have such a glaring deficiency, as this would allow former DOD members to essentially "fish" for information by throwing everything they can in their requests and seeing which of the claims are objected to, and by whom.

Though it sounds farfetched to think it'd be this easy to fish for info, I also haven't seen anyone specifically explain if the agencies themselves already account for this and why it doesn't work.
 
Not so much that it'd be proof the claims are true, but per the DOPSR process they would have to cite which specific agency objected to which specific claims in the DOPSR form. He then stated that this would be a catch-22 for them, and that he'd then be free to release the actual DOPSR request with the requested ommissions as well as citations from the agencies that objected to them to the public to make of that what they will.
Couldn't they simply classify the DOPSR response if it was that sensitive?
 
Couldn't they simply classify the DOPSR response if it was that sensitive?
Grusch has leaked/shared the unclassified version of his whistleblower complaint but not the DOPSR documents. Makes me think the DOSPR paperwork is classified or he would have released it by now. It would certainly bolster his claims if he did.
 
I can't find the source right now, but ISTR the process was that Grusch submitted different versions until some came back as "cleared".
Kean made this point when she noted how there were multiple revisions of Grusch's DOPSR cleared statements, with one getting passed through by the next-day.
Go to the post (click "Slixton said") to see the interview this is based on.
 
John Greenewald:
External Quote:
Mr. Grusch states in his hypothetical, when asked about DOPSR, that a 3-letter agency will cite a "Security Classification Guide" (SCG) and it can be litigated after to fight any erroneous rejections/redactions. And then Mr. Grusch stated he would just "publish that" and the "public could make it's own interpretation" out of that SCG reference; three letter agency reference; and redaction(s) on his original request.
Again, I'm sorry - that's all not accurate on how it would play out.

First, an SCG cited does not have to be made public, at all. Below, I attached a couple examples of classified documents which I forced the declassification of (in part) prior to their declass dates, and these records show the government can easily exempt from public view where the classification decisions derive from. That practice shields the public from seeing exactly what Mr. Grusch stated he would've have shown if he was denied being allowed to speak about "crash retrievals". There is no proof that DOPSR was put in any "catch-22" situation. It's just not how that works.

Second, I'll take Mr. Grusch at his word that his DOPSR request is "redacted" for his use should DOPSR decide to do object to some of his material; but that doesn't make sense, either. They wouldn't just redact two words like "crash retrieval" (to stick with his hypothetical) but leave enough inference for the public to figure out what was redacted. Instead, they would mark out entire sections ensuring that classified information was not published by Grusch, and the public would not be able to deduce what it was. There are countless examples of how redactions are made in the context of national security/classified information released spanning decades.
John's third point is that if Grusch was forbidden to talk on a subject, and he hints at it anyway, he'd be in hot water legally.


Source: https://twitter.com/blackvaultcom/status/1701282753399103855
 
There are unfortunately several mentions by Jesse and Grusch of the Ariel school (1994) encounter. Ariel is something of a benchmark for me when I consider "grades" of believers, because it's a complicated psychological case. Believing that the cute earnest children are accurately reporting what they perceived (because kids don't lie and they know what they saw - this being the only "evidence" we have really) is bottom-of-the-barrel analysis. So it's disappointing, to say the least, that Grusch and the other guys believe it and keep using it in their examples.

Here are the mentions:

[30:35]
the nuclear UFO connection is deeper and more bizarre than you can ever imagine
Jesse is about to make a tortuous connection between a tiny Japanese town obsessed with UFOs, a reactor meltdown caused by an earthquake, and Ariel...

Remember that Vice story that ran in 2022 about a town in Japan that's obsessed with UFOs well it's a place called Iino and it's right next to Fukushima where a 2011 earthquake triggered a famous nuclear power meltdown [Jesse]
[30:42]
Iino is indeed right next to Fukushima (9km) but the reactor that melted down is 53km away (as the crow/radiation flies).
1694525742288.png


The meltdown was caused by a natural disaster in 2011. Iino has been having UFO sightings since the 1970s:
Stories of alien sightings and landings of mysterious aircraft have emerged from Iino as far back as the 1970s.
Source: Vice, 2022

I'm failing to see what connection he's trying to make. The UFOs caused an earthquake to make the reactor melt down? Are all earthquakes caused by UFOs? How mean is that.

Then he links all this to Ariel as there is supposedly a uranium mine near the school. Not a reactor or even a melted down reactor, but an unspecified unlocated "as far as I understand" mine:
[30:59]
Jesse: Or take this incident in 1994. 62 elementary school kids at the Ariel International School in Zimbabwe said that they saw a silver craft descend from the sky and land on a field near their school. Well, guess where the Ariel school was?
Other guy: And you know in Ariel school, that was near a uranium mining site.
Grusch: That is right, as far as I understand.

By the way, zero witnesses at Ariel described a craft descending from the sky and landing. They did report men running around outside the craft, which I suppose now has something to do with a "nuclear UFO connection".

Another reference to Ariel:
[1:16:57]
Jesse: I think that the Extraterrestrial Hypothesis is actually more far-fetched - I think the idea that another species would evolutionarily converge to be bipedal, to have kind of the symmetric bilateral symmetry -
Grusch: Yeah cuz if we look at like the Ariel School event, if we believe the hundred school children that saw bipedal hominid looking kind of NHI, that seems pretty rare to have the same development where they're gonna - it's either extraterrestrial and we're seeing bioengineered beings... that they were engineered specifically to look like that.

He picks Ariel school to illustrate the typical alien grey. There are so many other cases he could've picked (including a generalized pop culture alien grey) that are more vague and therefore more "believable", but since he believes in Ariel it works for him.

Jesse continues with the less far-fetched theory - that aliens are future humans:
I like this sort of you know beings from the future hypothesis, for a few reasons. So there's actually a concept in evolutionary biology called neoteny where your distant offspring looks like your kids currently... the beings are sort of childlike in nature.

Grusch's use of "NHI" in interviews, in preference to alien/ET, is presumably because he likes the future human idea (he's nodding along here) - but aren't future humans by definition not NHI?

Neoteny aside, I can make an argument that alien greys are more like elderly frail lanky bald humans than chubby rosy-cheeked hyperactive emotionally immature children. I think it's a less creepy argument given they are obsessed with breeding with us.

Ariel is again mentioned when the guys get spiritual. One of them was moved by something witness Lisel told John Mack:
[1:48:38]
...he's trying to understand how the telepathy was working and then she goes out of nowhere. "I think in space there is no love but down here there is."

which prompts Grusch to talk about NDEs and Dr Eben Alexander's "scientific outlook" on the subject.
That was like this like overarching like loving energy, something when he ascended to this - sounded like dimensional plane, if you will... he miraculously came back and he was totally fine, but all this knowledge and all this stuff he experienced.

We are in full-on woo mode now. It's a clue to Grusch's worldview, in the sense of what he accepts as evidence when he can speculate so freely about evidence-free subjects. It makes me wonder how his worldview affected his analysis of the information people were bringing him about reverse-engineering SAPs, which it would seem requires 100% rationality and 0% religion. Anyway, Jesse links it to Ariel for all the wrong reasons:
That's a super common thing in alien abduction experiences, whether it's the Ariel School or Commander George Hoover of the Navy actually talked about this. Aliens often come down and they say, "You don't know how powerful you are, you don't know how how amazing and powerful you are."

Well, there was no alien abduction at Ariel, and of the three kids John Mack extracted telepathic messages from, none were "You don't know how powerful you are". The messages were exactly what you'd expect to get from schoolkids in the 90s: Stop polluting the Earth.

Finally Grusch uses Ariel as an example of how the phenomenon is global [1:35:56], when he cites that case along with "Russia". If he or the show's editor are geographically challenged he may be referring to the Ukrainian UFO earlier this year, since the photo flashed on screen, a circle of lights in the sky, is the same one used to illustrate three news articles on that incident (do a Google Images search to find them.) The picture is of a building in Liverpool UK [h/t Gideon Reid].
1694530401274.png
1694530437119.png

Oh well, can't win 'em all.
 
Iino is indeed right next to Fukushima (9km) but the reactor that melted down is 53km away (as the crow/radiation flies).
1694525742288.png


The meltdown was caused by a natural disaster in 2011.
And it wouldn't have melted down if the backup generators hadn't been flooded.

As a third point on your map, consider the location of the epicenter of the earthquake:
SmartSelect_20230912-211016_Samsung Internet.jpg


Any possible connection can only be magical.
 
Then he links all this to Ariel as there is supposedly a uranium mine near the school. Not a reactor or even a melted down reactor, but an unspecified unlocated "as far as I understand" mine:
[30:59]
External Quote:

Jesse: Or take this incident in 1994. 62 elementary school kids at the Ariel International School in Zimbabwe said that they saw a silver craft descend from the sky and land on a field near their school. Well, guess where the Ariel school was?
Other guy: And you know in Ariel school, that was near a uranium mining site.
Grusch:That is right, as far as I understand.
IAEA report on uranium deposits worldwide (includes depleted deposits):
External Quote:

SmartSelect_20230912-211712_Samsung Notes.jpg

SmartSelect_20230912-211655_Samsung Notes.jpg
Each deposit is 300 km away, on the other side of the capital.
SmartSelect_20230912-212358_Maps.jpg

Where do these claims originate? They're easily disproven with little effort, can none of the "believers" and "journalists" be bothered? How about analysts with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency ("That is right, as far as I understand")?
 
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Just really quick here, the typical UFOlogy "fishing story" on full display.

At 30:59 of the video, Jesse says:

External Quote:
Jesse: Or take this incident in 1994. 62 elementary school kids at the Ariel International School in Zimbabwe said that they saw a silver craft descend from the sky and land on a field near their school.
Only a couple of dozen children were interviewed and/or drew pictures, so the 62 count is already a bit of an exaggeration as it refers to how many kids were supposed to be out at recess when the sighting took place.

Nevertheless, 46 minutes later in the video, Grusch now pumps this inflated number up to 100:

External Quote:
Grusch:
External Quote:
Yeah cuz if we look at like the Ariel School event, if we believe the hundred school children that saw bipedal hominid looking kind of NHI,
Classic. It also shows Grusch's has no problem exaggerating the facts as needed for dramatic effect, something that doesn't bode well for his claims.
 
Just really quick here, the typical UFOlogy "fishing story" on full display.

At 30:59 of the video, Jesse says:

External Quote:
Jesse: Or take this incident in 1994. 62 elementary school kids at the Ariel International School in Zimbabwe said that they saw a silver craft descend from the sky and land on a field near their school.
Only a couple of dozen children were interviewed and/or drew pictures, so the 62 count is already a bit of an exaggeration as it refers to how many kids were supposed to be out at recess when the sighting took place.

Nevertheless, 46 minutes later in the video, Grusch now pumps this inflated number up to 100:

External Quote:
Grusch:
External Quote:
Yeah cuz if we look at like the Ariel School event, if we believe the hundred school children that saw bipedal hominid looking kind of NHI,
Classic. It also shows Grusch's has no problem exaggerating the facts as needed for dramatic effect, something that doesn't bode well for his claims.
To me what this interview shows is that Grusch is connected to popular UFO narratives in the online UFO community, which is significant because he claimed in his congressional testimony that he was a hardened skeptic until he was presented with evidence by people he was interviewing. I guess it's still possible that he was, but it's clear from his account of Ariel that, whether he was or wasn't, he's now just regurgitating the popular online narrative of Ariel as fact (and even then, getting some of the details from the popular narrative wrong).

This whole interview seems to sign-post that Grusch plans on going the way of Elizondo, becoming a UFO celebrity who will make a career of speculating wildly and rehashing popular UFO mythos on the podcast and convention circuit. When anyone tries to pin him on anything specific, he can always fall back on his DOPSR and claim he's not authorized to speak on it, which is Elizondo's schtick.
 
And it wouldn't have melted down if the backup generators hadn't been flooded.

As a third point on your map, consider the location of the epicenter of the earthquake:

Am I just too cynical now, that when Jesse Michels said the UFO town was "right next to Fukushima..." I just knew before I even looked at a map that I was going to be disappointed in the phrase "right next to"?

BTW the town of Iino is hard to find on Google maps - it's a tiny town of 1900 popn and didn't come up when I searched. The Vice article named their UFO museum, and the museum is easy to find on Google maps.
 
Each deposit is 300 km away, on the other side of the capital.

Where do these claims originate? They're easily disproven with little effort, can none of the "believers" and "journalists" be bothered? How about analysts with the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency ("That is right, as far as I understand")?

It's a secret uranium mine.
 
This is what irritates me to no end and I actually commented this on the video. At 1:03:50, he says this about why people are dismissive of the UFO topic:
people who have absolutely no interest in pursuing truth, who embellish stories and sell snake oil for a living.
Then, you realize the title of the video is:
UFO Whistleblower Dave Grusch Tells Me Everything
People are going to click on that thinking Grusch spilled the beans. Jesse knew this would be misleading and went with it anyway. Looks like embellishment and snake oil to me.
 
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Only a couple of dozen children were interviewed and/or drew pictures, so the 62 count is already a bit of an exaggeration as it refers to how many kids were supposed to be out at recess when the sighting took place.

The number 62 actually comes from the number of drawings made. (The older children were asked on Monday to draw what they'd seen on Friday. The younger children were not included in this, or in the interviews.) I have about 60 on my website (there are "fake" ones floating around but I verified all these - they either appear in Cynthia Hind's book/articles, or are visible in the footage hanging on the wall etc.) All 300(?) children were out at recess, and all teachers were in a staff meeting.

Yes, there are only recorded interviews with a couple of dozen children altogether, over the weeks immediately following the incident - so the drawings are the "testimony" of the others, and many are clearly just imaginative or representations from popular culture, this one being a fairly obvious example:
1694575452712.png


This isn't strictly relevant to the topic except to show what kind of "evidence" this case consists of - evidence that apparently convinced Grusch despite its manifest problems. Yes the kids are cute and sincere, but it's vitally important to take into account child psychology and the school environment. I've not yet come across a "true believer" in this case who has done so. "Why would kids make it up?" is the usual response.

Note that despite his UFO looking nothing like the other children's and rather a lot like the Invaders spaceship, this child (Fungai, called Francis by Hind) was one of the 12 interviewed by Mack, and one of the 3 who reported telepathic communication. Looking at the entire transcript (and watching the video) it's clear to me that Mack coerces the "message" out of him. He's asked to "imagine" and struggles to come up with an answer.

What do you imagine is his reason for visiting Earth? [cut] Fungai, what do you imagine is his reason for this anger?

Hmm, I think it’s about something that’s gonna happen.

Something that's gonna happen, like what?

Hmm… Pollution or something. [shrug]

Full clip of Fungai's interview (taken from Ariel Phenomenon 2022, timestamped):

Source: https://youtu.be/zccIDOuYjoE?si=gWe5uaOlPhtcLw0l&t=84
 

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Wow! You guys should look at the comments on the YouTube video. So many people are hook, line, and sinker on Grush. It’s also extremely fascinating how nonchalant Grush is talking about these alleged programs and NHIs like it’s a completely normal thing and not the biggest news story in human history. The way it’s talked about seems completely incongruent with the magnitude of the subject if (and it’s a massive if) it’s true.
 
The number 62 actually comes from the number of drawings made.

I stand corrected Charlie. I was in a hurry and was really trying to show how they started with 62 and bumped that up to 100 in 40 minutes. I was about to check your blog but got sloppy, my bad.

Ariel School threads:

Have you checked out Charlie's blog on Ariel? Too bad it wasn't around when the Ariel treads were going. She does a bang-up job of listing every available transcript and video of the kids being interviewed from the very start and shows how the investigators picked and chose the various parts to create the story as we now know it.

https://threedollarkit.weebly.com/ariel-school.html
 
Most of the interview appears to have happened a day or two after the hearings.

They only briefly mention the mental health stuff towards the end though don't go into much detail (not that there's much to go into anyway). Grusch mentions having received treatment for his PTSD and having been surprised by how effective he found EMDR and HRV breathwork for his PTSD symptoms.

Timestamp is 1:33:48
Right before that part he also talks about his autism diagnosis and having only learned that he was autistic in his 30's.

On the day of the hearings I posted on YouTube that Grusch has an open body language. Some people where pointing out the tells for lies he was unconsciously sending out however that might not be the case. I suspected he had higher level autism spectrum disorder (ASD). As such he has difficulty recognizing the meaning and facial expressions and body language of others. He would make a terrible insurance claims assessor or detective interviewing people! In short, he is interacting with people who might be pulling his leg or empire building and he is unable to pick up the visual clues but takes things at face value.
 
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