George Knapp - Statement to Congress

knobby

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George Knapp was at the July congressional UAP hearing, sitting behind the 3 witnesses. He didn't speak but submitted a statement which I found on his radio station's web site.
https://knpr.org/show/knprs-state-o...-attends-ufo-congress-hearing-what-came-of-it

It's only 4 pages and worth a read. A couple of points I found very interesting.

Firstly George can only say that the special access programs holding alien materials story is only a rumour although he points the finger at Bigelow Aerospace. I wonder if this is the same claim that Grusch is making about special access programs. Knapp even uses similar language as Grusch when he said seeking access to the exotic materials was met with harsh rebukes.


One of the things that led to the demise of AAWSAP was the pursuit of certain exotic materials rumored to exist within special access programs. One condition of the Bigelow contract withDIA was that Bigelow’s Aerospace plant in Las Vegas must be engineered so that it could accept, store, and study certain exotic materials. AAWSAP managers believe these materials were collected from sites where unknown aircraft had crashed. When Dr. Lacatski began pressing the issue, seeking access to the exotic materials, he was met with harsh rebukes. The door, in essence, was slammed in his face. And powerful interests began to apply pressure to end AAWSAP. It lasted a mere 27 months before the plug was pulled, instead of a five year operation as planned by DIA.
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He also pushes paranormal claims and claims UFO sightings are often associated with the appearance of strange creatures and bizarre phenomena.


AAWSAP investigated a wider range of phenomena than mystery craft seen in the sky. Some of the encounters reported by intelligence operatives were downright weird. AAWSAP personnel suspected that the sighting of weird creatures and bizarre phenomena in the proximity of UFO activity might be some sort of unintentional side effect of a technology that is seemingly beyond anything we currently possess.
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I am left wondering if George has shared the ghist of Grusch's major claims already. If that's the case then it's not much.
 

Attachments

  • George-Knapp-Congressional-Record-Submission.pdf
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George Knapp
AAWSAP personnel suspected that the sighting of weird creatures and bizarre phenomena in the proximity of UFO activity might be some sort of unintentional side effect of a technology that is seemingly beyond anything we currently possess.
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Tbh this sounds like the plot to a hit SciFi/Horror series.

Please don't nest EX tags and quote tags. The "external content" tag by itself is enough.
 
Tbh this sounds like the plot to a hit SciFi/Horror series.

Please don't nest EX tags and quote tags. The "external content" tag by itself is enough.
Could fit perfectly in an old Dr. Who episode.
 
If I were a journalist writing a letter congress, I would at least proof-read it before sending it, not to mention before I published it on my own homepage. Some of the typos are embarrassing. It is also very confusing that he seemingly writes "Russia" when he means "The USSR" as well as when he means post-Soviet Russia.

Another nitpick I have is that he claims that the Soviet/Russian investigation was the largest UFO investigation ever, lasting 10 years. But then, just a few paragraphs down, he claims that the AAWSAP study was the largest ever government funded study. I must assume he means US government funded, since I very much doubt that the Soviet/Russian study (as Knapp describes it) was smaller.

Also, his description of the AAWSAP research papers seems to claim that they wrote over a 100 papers specifically on UAPs, some of them over a 100 pages long that was never released outside of whatever office at DoD that they reported to, not even to congress. Contrast this with the 37 papers (as far as I know) from AAWSAP that are public. None of them are over a 100 pages long, and I wouldn't classify any of those I looked at as "highly detailed research papers". They seem to contain very little original research and most read rather as introductory texts to a subject, like something you would find in a university textbook (or a wikipedia article) rather than research papers. This suggests that the 37 papers we do know of would be atypical for the AAWSAP research at large, if one is to believe George Knapp at least (which I personally don't, but lets give him the benefit of doubt, just for the sake of argument). This begs the question as to why those papers were written and for whom they were meant, as well as why none of the highly detailed research papers has been published or leaked in any way. Considering the amount of claims coming from the Invisible College/Skinwalker Ranch crowd otherwise, and their strong stance on disclosure, I am somewhat surprised they have been steadfast in not breaking any NDAs they signed during their AAWSAP years, not leaking even one paper to any journalists, not even their friend Knapp. That is a moot point though, since if/when the 2023 UAP Disclosure Act gets approved by congress they will have both the opportunity and obligation to give congress everything they got.

Of course, if the DoD took every scrape of paper that the AAWSAP produced and allowed no copies to be made, and everyone on AAWSAP dutifully obliged and none kept any copies of their own (an assumption that is somewhat contradicted by the 37 known papers, even though none of them seems to have been classified to begin with) then we're left with the original problem: that any extraordinary claims about AAWSAP can't be corroborated by evidence if the DoD doesn't want to share the things AAWSAP gave them.


It was likely the largest UFO study ever conducted with the use of government funds. It began in Sept. 2008 and quickly ramped up. At one point, it employed 50 full time investigators, far more than Project Blue Book or the UAP Task Force, or AARO. The team compiled what might be the largest and most sophisticated UFO data warehouse ever created, with more than 200,000 cases catalogued. The data base included reports from civilian organizations and foreign governments, as well as new investigations conducted by boots-on-the ground teams dispatched by AAWSAP’s manager in Las Vegas, Dr. Colm Kelleher. It was an astonishing effort that also produced more than 100 highly detailed research papers, many of them more than 100 pages long.
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But later he gives a statement alluding to the broader scope of AAWSAP in concert with this large UAP study, which one could interpret as pertaining to at least some of the 37 known papers, which again casts doubt on Knapp's claim that the AAWSAP produced "highly detailed research papers, many of them more than 100 pages long".

I would be very interested to know what happened to their archive of 200,000 cases. I assume the DoD has it and has classified everything in it, because otherwise I see no reason for why Bigelow wouldn't have made it publicly available by now. It would certainly be a huge boon to serious ufologists if such a collection of files would become more widely available. The largest I know of now is the AFU (Archives For the Unexplained) in Norrköping, Sweden, which has around 50,000 UFO case reports.
 
I'd love to see @NorCal Dave and @Luis Cayetano's opinion on whether Knapp's short history of US government spending on AASWAP and its descendants is accurate.

Going on memory at the moment, the Kindel reader app with Knapp's book is on my other computer but I can pull some quotes from the thread on AWWSAP:

One of the things that led to the demise of AAWSAP was the pursuit of certain exotic materials rumored to exist within special access programs. One condition of the Bigelow contract with DIA was that Bigelow’s Aerospace plant in Las Vegas must be engineered so that it could accept, store, and study certain exotic materials. AAWSAP managers believe these materials were collected from sites where unknown aircraft had crashed. When Dr. Lacatski began pressing the issue, seeking access to the exotic materials, he was met with harsh rebukes. The door, in essence, was slammed in his face. And powerful interests began to apply pressure to end AAWSAP. It lasted a mere 27 months before the plug was pulled, instead of a five year operation as planned by DIA.
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https://www.metabunk.org/attachments/george-knapp-congressional-record-submission-pdf.61125/

First of all, note that this is a repeating theme. We have the Eric Davis claiming that Admr. Wilson tried to get access and was rebuked, now Lacatski and of course Grusch.

I don't recall this in the book at all. I don't think they ever mentioned meta-materials or if they did it was in passing. Certainly nothing about BAASS building a special lab in Vegas for "exotic materials" or Lacatski being rebuked or "powerful interests" trying to shut AAWSAP down. If that was the case, why leave all of that out of the book that is supposed to tell the story of AAWSAP?

The closest it gets is mentioning BAASS, or maybe more accurately Bigelow's already existing labs as available for MUFON:

BAASS had multiple laboratories that were ready to conduct forensic, photographic, metallurgic, chemical, isotope, biological, and chemical analysis of any specimens that BAASS received from MUFON.
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pg. 110

In the book, Knapp et al suggest that Ried was worried about others in the DIA/DoD finding out how "successful" AAWSAP was, or in Knapp speak "the investigative horsepower" it had attained, and they would want a piece of the action:

…the breadth and the scope of the investigative horsepower of the fledgling organization had astonished the senior politician. Given what he had just heard from Bigelow, Reid was concerned that BAASS would get too high a profile at DoD in the near future and that the AAWSAP contract would be exposed and essentially unprotected from potential opponents at DoD.
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pg. 90 Knapp, George. Kelleher, Colm A.. Lacatski, James. Skinwalkers at the Pentagon: An Insiders' Account of the Secret Government UFO Program. RTMA, LLC. Kindle Edition.

Of course, this can also be read as Reid was concerned AAWSAP would get too high a profile and people might realize he was using Lacatski to funnel $22mil to BAASS which was owned by his campaign donor Bigelow who was using the DoD funds to fart around at Skinwalker Ranch, a property he owned. One can see where they might want to keep AAWSAP on the down low.

As for trying to get access to UAP related stuff, the guy(s) at AAWSAP did try to get info from a USAF group, Air Force Office of Special Investigations-Special Projects, that among other things tracked UAPs as related to classified aircraft. It seems AAWSAP wanted the AFOSI-PJ to share information about classified flights so they could compare them to UFO sightings and help AFOSI-PJ identify when their flights were being seen. And something about some UFOs in 1975:

BAASS wanted to establish a relationship with AFOSI-PJ for several reasons. The primary reason was to explore the possibility that BAASS could share its UAP sighting data (with all witness personal details redacted) with AFOSI so that AFOSI could identify those sightings that involved Air Force Special Access Programs. Then, by elimination, BAASS could concentrate on the sightings that were “unknown.” By eliminating the cases that were “ours,” BAASS could thus prevent a waste of its time and resources on investigating secret Air Force technology.

…BAASS needed data from AFOSI on historical and current UAP events, specifically for data that AFOSI had gathered on the October-November 1975 incursions by unknown flying objects into the so called “Northern Tier” Air Force bases at Wurtsmith AFB Michigan, Loring AFB Maine, Malmstrom AFB Montana, and Minot AFB North Dakota.
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pg. 95-96

As one would expect, the AFOSI-PJ was well aware of classified flights being reported as UFOs:

He explained that during the years and decades of research and development (R&D) of both F-117 and B-2 aircraft, AFOSI-PJ maintained a very active surveillance of UAP reports and UAP organizations producing those reports. The purpose was to “deconflict” with the Air Force R&D programs. Hennessey confided that a substantial number of “UAP sightings” during the 1970s-2000 were identified by AFOSI-PJ as known Air Force SAPs and R&D efforts.
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pg. 97Knapp, George. Kelleher, Colm A.. Lacatski, James. Skinwalkers at the Pentagon: An Insiders' Account of the Secret Government UFO Program. RTMA, LLC. Kindle Edition.

AAWSAP had nothing to offer and IIRC they were refused the classified information they wanted. Strip out the specifics of the various agencies and this anecdote is a classic and truthful case of "requesting and being refused classified information concerning UAPs". A coverup if you will.

This suggests that the 37 papers we do know of would be atypical for the AAWSAP research at large, if one is to believe George Knapp at least (which I personally don't, but lets give him the benefit of doubt, just for the sake of argument). This begs the question as to why those papers were written and for whom they were meant, as well as why none of the highly detailed research papers has been published or leaked in any way.

The 37 DIRD papers are either the legitimate work of AAWSAP as per its original RFP or can be seen as a cover for what they were really doing. The original RFP asked for technical studies in a number of areas, and that's ALL it asked for, none of the other shenanigans that went on at SWR or out UFO hunting was EVER in the RFP. Just technical studies on future tech:

3. REQUIREMENTS: a) The contractor shall complete advanced aerospace weapon system technical studies in the following areas: 1. lift; 2. propulsion; 3. control; 4. power generation; 5. spatial temporal translation; 6. materials; 7. configuration, structure; 8. signature reduction (optical, infrared, radiofrequency, acoustic); 9. human interface; 10. human effects; 11. armament (RF and DEW); 12. other peripheral areas in support of (1-11); b) It is expected that numerous experts with extensive experience (minimum of 10 years) in breakthrough aerospace research and development will be required. c) A technical plan for conducting the advanced aerospace weapon system studies must be submitted by the contractor.
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pg. 21-22

Our old friend Hal Puthoff was in charge of the studies, and this resulted in the 37 DIRD papers:

The purpose of Project Physics was to create a repository of position papers by world experts that defined the current and projected state of the art in Aerospace Technology, all pertaining to the 12 technological areas chosen by DIA. In order to accomplish this BAASS contracted with Hal Puthoff, CEO of EarthTech International, with instructions to choose the precise nature and scope of the approximately 38 position papers that would encompass those 12 technical areas.
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pg. 47

But, as AAWSAP was paying BAASS to do all kinds of other stuff not in the RFP, it generated a lot of reports and papers such as studies on seeds at SWR and the migration patterns of were-wolves at SWR:

A 360-page report that included comprehensive descriptions of the plant and seed data obtained by the AAWSAP BAASS team on Skinwalker Ranch was delivered to the DIA in April 2010. The purpose of the plant research on Skinwalker Ranch was to obtain pilot experimental data on whether plants could function as biosensors or reporters for any putative electromagnetic energy or other radiation on the property.
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pg. 139

Eleven of the individuals recounted firsthand encounters with a dog- or wolf-like creature that could run at speed on two legs, sometimes in conjunction with “orb like activity.”

From the details provided in interviews about bipedal creatures, BAASS constructed a map showing the “migration routes” of these creatures.
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pg. 130

There was also lots of UFO stuff. Included with the 37 DIRD papers was a catalog of UFO sightings by MUFON's John F. Schuessler and numerous field reports including Tic Tac:

Since the Tic Tac investigation was initiated and executed by AAWSAP BAASS, Axelrod’s 13-page report was one of the 100 reports AAWSAP submitted to the Defense Intelligence Agency.
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pg. 113

Lacatski published the last of the 38 DIRDs on January 11, 2011. Voluminous high-quality material (more than a hundred separate reports, as detailed in Appendix I) was submitted to the DIA in just over two years of the program’s existence.
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pg. 26-27
Knapp, George. Kelleher, Colm A.. Lacatski, James. Skinwalkers at the Pentagon: An Insiders' Account of the Secret Government UFO Program. RTMA, LLC. Kindle Edition.

It may be that much of what AAWSAP generated is just crap. UFO stories and sightings with little or no actual evidence and other wierdshitology from SWR.

I really don't know what to make of Knapp. He and Corbel are still touting Bob Lazar as far as I know, and I haven't seen where they've corrected their story on the UFO over 29 Palms which is just flares. Is he a conman and a huckster? Maybe.

But I'm remined again of my friend Tim and his "Timmy Tales". Nuggets of truth that are embellished and exaggerated mixed with a bit of fabrication and confabulation to create a more compelling and entertaining narrative in which Tim is often the central character.

Knapp showed up in Las Vegas at 26 with a Masters in Communications from University of the Pacific (UOP) in Stockton CA where he grew up and got on as an intern:

He moved to Las Vegas in 1979, working first as a cab driver before being hired as an intern at KLVX-TV Channel 10.[7] From there, Knapp was hired as a reporter and news anchor for KLAS in 1981.[7]
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Knapp_(television_journalist)

Area 51 and Bob Lazar created Knapp's modern-day persona. He's had PhD level folks that he trusts and admires like Puthoff and Davis feeding him stories of secret UFO retrieval and reverse engineering programs for decades. He brought Bigelow to Skinwalker Ranch and helped create it. He introduced Bigelow to the leader of the US Senate, Harry Reid one of the most powerful men in the world at the time. He was front and center at the UAP hearings. He's a weekend host on Coast to Coast AM, one of the most popular radio shows in the US of the last few decades. After starting as a cab driving intern.

Maybe the world he's in is constructed around these stories and if the evidence is a bit weak, so be it. It's gotten him pretty far.
 
I have some thoughts on pork and plus up money, but will not bother as it will not add to what I think is one of the best posts I've read in my relatively short time here. Well done, Dave.

As for Congress, shame on them if they put credence in the self-serving "on the record" statements of a guy who makes what I would suspect is a lucrative supplemental income from paranormal talk radio, books, and conferences. I think it's a safe bet we'll see Knapp flying his "requested to advise Congress on UFOs" flag in his future self promotional endeavors.
 
I don't recall this in the book at all. I don't think they ever mentioned meta-materials or if they did it was in passing. Certainly nothing about BAASS building a special lab in Vegas for "exotic materials" or Lacatski being rebuked or "powerful interests" trying to shut AAWSAP down. If that was the case, why leave all of that out of the book that is supposed to tell the story of AAWSAP?
Just checked and most mentions of "exotic" in the book (Skinwalkers at the Pentagon) are related to exotic aerospace tech (e.g., anti-gravity, vacuum energy, wormholes)--what they were supposed to be studying.

Examples:

p. 38
In addition to his MDA support duties, in 2008 Lacatski became the DIA program manager, Contracting Officer Representative (COR), security coordinator, and counterintelligence coordinator of a multi-year $22 million DIA contract covering exotic aerospace technologies.
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p. 42
Ultimately, more than 75 contractor personnel performed exotic aerospace research and several hundred part-time personnel conducted field work. A multi-million-dollar database to store contract research data was developed. For contractor products that would be published by DIA, 38 Defense Intelligence Reference Documents (DIRDs) to be exact, Lacatski provided final technical review and editing, and arranged for posting on the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System (JWICS).
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The only one related to ET/UFOs are about remote viewers seeing secret bases with exotic craft and crashes, not BAASS building one.

p. 125
From time to time during the STAR GATE program, remote viewers had detected exotic events and technologies relevant to the AAWSAP BAASS initiative. These included detection of apparent basing facilities for exotic craft, description of apparent exotic craft accidents, and observation of exotic craft surveillance of military targets, the latter correlating with independent national resource records.
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And some quotes from Brandon Fugal about "exotic craft" flying around SWR.

But I wouldn't be surprised if Bigs built his own secret alien lab/hanger (that just sat empty) with Puthoff and Davis and company telling him other people were already doing it. I know they've always been looking for "exotic material" from alleged crashes all through NIDS/BAASS/AAWSAP/TTSA but I never heard of them getting anything other than Art's Parts from LMH and Nolan's bits from the alleged Ubatuba crash, which you nicely documented in the meta materials thread.
 
Just checked and most mentions of "exotic" in the book (Skinwalkers at the Pentagon) are related to exotic aerospace tech (e.g., anti-gravity, vacuum energy, wormholes)--what they were supposed to be studying

Thank you for looking into that sir. Didn't have time to comb through the book just yet, but as you did, you brought up another good quote:

Ultimately, more than 75 contractor personnel performed exotic aerospace research and several hundred part-time personnel conducted field work. A multi-million-dollar database to store contract research data was developed. For contractor products that would be published by DIA, 38 Defense Intelligence Reference Documents (DIRDs) to be exact, Lacatski provided final technical review and editing, and arranged for posting on the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System (JWICS).
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Now compare that to Knapp's description of AAWSAP in his statement:

...have not learned much about AAWSAP. It was likely the largest UFO study ever conducted with the use of government funds. It began in Sept. 2008 and quickly ramped up. At one point, it employed 50 full time investigators, far more than Project Blue Book or the UAP Task Force, or AARO. The team compiled what might be the largest and most sophisticated UFO data warehouse ever created, with more than 200,000 cases catalogued. The data base included reports from civilian organizations and foreign governments, as well as new investigations conducted by boots-on-the ground teams dispatched by AAWSAP’s manager in Las Vegas, Dr. Colm Kelleher.
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Lots of contractors and maybe 50 full timers or several hundred part-timers, a big data base that cost multi-millions of dollars, field teams and I don't know what else. Aside from the ~$350,000 that MUFON got from BAASS, to my knowledge there are no records of where any of the $22 million went, other than to BAASS.

I think if we read between the lines, BAASS had a core group of a few SWR people like Kelleher and Kurth and some others. There was also a group of contractors that were rounded up by Puthoff to produce the DIRD papers. As for a big chunk, I wouldn't be surprised if many of the 50 to several hundred employees were just part of Bigelow's other companies, that were clocking in as BAASS employees when their duties warranted it.

AAWSAP and therefore BAASS only lasted for 2 years, how did it go from nobody to 50 or several hundred employees then back to 0 in that short of a time period? Just the management structure needed for that many employees would take months to create and staff. The book pretty much hints that a lot of the field "crews" were just MUFON volunteers that were maybe getting spiffed by BAASS.

I'm rambling off topic. Sorry.
 
Lots of contractors and maybe 50 full timers or several hundred part-timers, a big data base that cost multi-millions of dollars, field teams and I don't know what else. Aside from the ~$350,000 that MUFON got from BAASS, to my knowledge there are no records of where any of the $22 million went, other than to BAASS.
Have to wonder how much money they just wasted on stuff like creating advanced simulations of a physics-defying breath mint.

p. 124
A major part of the analysis of Tic Tac speed and acceleration performance utilized ANSYS Engineering Software. Back in 2010, the ANSYS Workbench platform was a powerful multi-domain simulation environment that harnessed the core physics from ANSYS, enabled their interoperability, and provided common tools for interfacing with CAD (computer-aided design), repairing geometry, creating meshes, and post-processing results.

To BAASS’s knowledge, this powerful computational capability had not been previously utilized in the 75-year history of UFO study. The 141-page report that was submitted to DIA stated: “It is hypothesized that through this broader ranging ANSYS analysis, additional theoretical constructs can be generated regarding UAP and USO behavior. These in turn could provide the scaffolding for advanced engineering concepts.”

The report included ANSYS simulations and analysis of Tic Tac velocities and acceleration as well as simulations of a Tic Tac entering the water and simulations of Tic Tac movement through water. These latter simulations could form a baseline for future UAPTF studies and analysis of so called “transmedium” UAP behavior, as reported by documentary filmmaker Jeremy Corbell and George Knapp. A “transmedium vehicle” is usually defined in this context as one capable of operating in multiple domains, for example in the air and underwater.
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Have to wonder how much money they just wasted on stuff like creating advanced simulations of a physics-defying breath mint.

Indeed. From your post:

A major part of the analysis of Tic Tac speed and acceleration performance utilized ANSYS Engineering Software. Back in 2010, the ANSYS Workbench platform was a powerful multi-domain simulation environment that harnessed the core physics from ANSYS, enabled their interoperability, and provided common tools for interfacing with CAD (computer-aided design), repairing geometry, creating meshes, and post-processing results.
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pg. 124

Now I'm not going to pretend to be an engineer or software guy or anything like that, but this is how Wiki describes using the Ansys Workbench:

Most Ansys simulations are performed using the Ansys Workbench system,[43] which is one of the company's main products.[6] Typically Ansys users break down larger structures into small components that are each modeled and tested individually.[5] A user may start by defining the dimensions of an object,[44] and then adding weight, pressure, temperature and other physical properties.[44] Finally, the Ansys software simulates and analyzes movement, fatigue, fractures, fluid flow, temperature distribution, electromagnetic efficiency and other effects over time.[44]
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ansys

What exactly were they analyzing? All they had was a description of a Tic Tac shaped object of indeterminate size, weight and density. There are no descriptions of it's component parts or structure.

To BAASS’s knowledge, this powerful computational capability had not been previously utilized in the 75-year history of UFO study. The 141-page report that was submitted to DIA stated: “It is hypothesized that through this broader ranging ANSYS analysis, additional theoretical constructs can be generated regarding UAP and USO behavior. These in turn could provide the scaffolding for advanced engineering concepts.”
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On the one hand this is just more hype about what AAWSAP and BAASS were spending money on. But on the other hand, more pertinent to our whistleblower discussion, this could be taken as "reverse engineering of UAPs" right?

The analysis of could "provide the scaffolding for advanced engineering". No actual physical UAP needed. Someone could be told "new technology is being reverse engineered from UAPs" and in the context of the above quote from the book, it would be true(ish).

And you gotta like that all this Ansys stuff basically confirms Corbel and Knapp's (in the 3rd person) "documentaries":

These latter simulations could form a baseline for future UAPTF studies and analysis of so called “transmedium” UAP behavior, as reported by documentary filmmaker Jeremy Corbell and George Knapp.
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What exactly were they analyzing? All they had was a description of a Tic Tac shaped object of indeterminate size, weight and density.
That's exactly what I asked myself when I read it.
For example, we have discussed here what ambiguities there are in the flight altitudes alone, starting with this post:
https://www.metabunk.org/threads/20...o-flir-footage-flir1.9190/page-22#post-283604

In which time an object falls, and which speed it has then, is only a small mental arithmetic problem. What do you investigate beyond that? In pure speculation? At which assumed mass which kinetic energy is to be assumed? which G-forces act on possible pilots at which assumed curve radius? Etc.? And from this would then arise the specifications for an aircraft to be developed resp. "re-engineered"? Wouldn't that rather be the level of a working group in a high school project? Have simulations ever been published that give an impression of this? I don't remember the passages from the book at all and I don't remember this issue being discussed anywhere.

If you now consider which dramatis personae are acting here, from the impatient billionaire, who finally wants to get aliens for all his money, to Pentagon employees, who secretly reenact space battles with Star Wars figures on their desks, scientists who invent new chemical elements and scribble all over the blackboard and on the wall, to hillbillies, who chase werewolves at night - and the busy reporter, who turns it all into books and reality TV.

The whole thing could hardly be better constructed as the script of a real satire. And maybe one day we will see it on the big screen.

Nevertheless, we have to assume for the time being that there might be something to it an remain objective, how hard it may be. The fact that the acting figures with all their inedaquacies for their part do not apply objective critiques makes the matter somewhat unbalanced, as always. Even unbiased people, who are only marginally interested, can hardly be convinced that this kind of outrageous misjudgements and bizarre occurrences even on high hierarchical levels are possible. Cynical propagandists, believers or not, always know how to take advantage of the fact that gossips and rumors always leave their mark and can never be eliminated.
 
What exactly were they analyzing? All they had was a description of a Tic Tac shaped object of indeterminate size, weight and density. There are no descriptions of it's component parts or structure.
It appears they have various theories about alien technology and have built some models which they try to fit to the observations. Any inputs such as mass, size, etc are subjective but the idea would be that if you observe enough UFO encounters you'll eventually find some consistency in the assumptions. Of course if you are assuming a tictac is moving at high speed when it's actually a gimbal rotation then you are feeding garbage into the model.

It was probably quite interesting work for the engineers and scientists. I can see how somebody hearing about these experiments could come to the conclusion that they were studying captured alien technology.
 
I am interested in the scale of intelligent life. Would be about human sized? If so, Why If not why not? Is this related to brain size and that's related to body size?
 
On the one hand this is just more hype about what AAWSAP and BAASS were spending money on. But on the other hand, more pertinent to our whistleblower discussion, this could be taken as "reverse engineering of UAPs" right?
BAASS
=
Build An Alien Space Ship ? ;)
 
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