cmnit

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The Italian chemtrailist Tankerenemy is recently (mis)using a scientific paper by and an interview to well known and respected scientist Ulrike Lohmann (ETH Zurich).

Besides other things, she is seriously involved in efforts to assess and potentially reduce the atmospheric pollution induced by aviation, particularly in terms of nanoparticulate combustion exhausts. Here is the abstract of the paper published by Atmospheric Environment which she coauthored (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.03.051):


Highlights
• First PM aircraft exhaust measurements using single particle mass spectrometry.
• The majority of the investigated particles contained one or more metallic compound.
• The metals and the soot were found to be internally mixed in the emitted particles.
• Potential sources of the detected metals (fuel, oil and engine wear) were discussed.
Abstract
Non-volatile aircraft engine emissions are an important anthropogenic source of soot particles in the upper troposphere and in the vicinity of airports. They influence climate and contribute to global warming. In addition, they impact air quality and thus human health and the environment. The chemical composition of non-volatile particulate matter emission from aircraft engines was investigated using single particle time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The exhaust from three different aircraft engines was sampled and analyzed. The soot particulate matter was sampled directly behind the turbine in a test cell at Zurich Airport. Single particle analyses will focus on metallic compounds. The particles analyzed herein represent a subset of the emissions composed of the largest particles with a mobility diameter >100 nm due to instrumental restrictions. A vast majority of the analyzed particles was shown to contain elemental carbon, and depending on the engine and the applied thrust the elemental carbon to total carbon ratio ranged from 83% to 99%. The detected metallic compounds were all internally mixed with the soot particles. The most abundant metals in the exhaust were Cr, Fe, Mo, Na, Ca and Al; V, Ba, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Mg, Mn, Si, Ti and Zr were also detected. We further investigated potential sources of the ATOFMS-detected metallic compounds using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. The potential sources considered were kerosene, engine lubrication oil and abrasion from engine wearing components. An unambiguous source apportionment was not possible because most metallic compounds were detected in several of the analyzed sources.
Content from External Source
Unfortunately the paper is behind a paywall, however Tankerenemy gives a link to the slides of a recent presentation at 20th ETH Conference on Combustion Generated Nanoparticles based on the paper.

The experimental results show metal residues "internally mixed" with elemental carbon (EC) nanoparticles (soot), including Aluminum and Barium. Guess what, this fact is quoted as a blatant confirmation of chemtrailists' stories without mentioning the quantities involved (typically, parts per million mass - ppmm), see slide 12.

I have not seen yet the recent doc Overcast (http://overcast-the-movie.com) which includes the interview to Professor Lohmann, I guess it misuses facts according to the chemtrailist bandwagon as Tankerenemy is provably doing in this case (his post in Italian).
 

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M Bornong

Senior Member.
The Italian chemtrailist Tankerenemy is recently (mis)using a scientific paper by and an interview to well known and respected scientist Ulrike Lohmann (ETH Zurich).

Besides other things, she is seriously involved in efforts to assess and potentially reduce the atmospheric pollution induced by aviation, particularly in terms of nanoparticulate combustion exhausts. Here is the abstract of the paper published by Atmospheric Environment which she coauthored (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.03.051):

There's been some discussion of this, https://www.metabunk.org/transcript...rcast-documentary-by-dedal-films.t6303/page-2
 
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