Links and resources

RolandD

Active Member
How 'bout a single thread to share other websites? Here's my initial contribution:

http://skeptoid.com A weekly podcast by Brian Dunning. From the website:

Each weekly episode focuses on a single phenomenon — an urban legend, a paranormal claim, alternative therapy, or something just plain stupid — that you've heard of, and that you probably believe in. Skeptoid attempts to expose the folly of belief in non-evidence based phenomena, and more importantly, explains the factual scientific reality.
http://rationalwiki.org Others have mentioned it, so here's the link.

Our purpose here at RationalWiki includes:

  1. Analyzing and refuting pseudoscience and the anti-science movement.
  2. Documenting the full range of crank ideas.
  3. Explorations of authoritarianism andfundamentalism.
  4. Analysis and criticism of how these subjects are handled in the media.
We welcome contributors, and encourage those who disagree with us to register and engage in constructive dialogue.
It would also be nice to hear the opinion of others on the sites that are posted. I find that many sites present themselves as skeptical and rational, but in reality peddle bunk.
 

Clock

Active Member
What a great idea for a thread! Not sure why we didn't see this before! So many sites... where to begin? :rolleyes:

Skeptoid and Rational Wiki are great sites. Rational Wiki helps for a quick look up on the theories that your are looking for.

http://skepticproject.com/

Is a great website that was once a hotspot for debunking. The forums appear to be inactive these days, mainly because most of the key members that were once on the website retired from debunking. However, some of the Featured articles are very good. (It is also THE website that debunks Alex Jones)

http://thrivedebunked.wordpress.com/

This is where most of the members of Skeptic Project went on, (and where they retired) Of course it focuses on debunking the Thrive movie, it also clears up the confusion between many theories that are out there.
 

Trigger Hippie

Senior Member
Here are some links from my bookmarks...


Blogs, Forums, podcasts.


http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/forumindex.php

  • Full of really smart people saying really smart things about a lot of stuff.

www.theskepticsguide.org/

  • The show features discussions of myths, conspiracy theories, pseudoscience, the paranormal, and many general forms of woo-woo, from the point of view of scientific skepticism.

http://www.csicop.org/si/show/field_guide_to_critical_thinking/

  • The mission of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry is to promote scientific inquiry, critical investigation, and the use of reason in examining controversial and extraordinary claims.

http://www.pandasthumb.org/

  • The anti anti-evolution movement.


Critical Thinking, Logical Fallacies, etc.

http://www.cracked.com/article_1946...-that-make-you-wrong-more-than-you-think.html

  • 5 Logical Fallacies That Make You Wrong More Than You Think.

http://www.fallacyfiles.org/

  • A list of things I commit more often than I should.
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Sources of bunk are sometimes also great sources of debunking. AboveTopSecret.com is surprisingly useful, especially for older conspiracies. You need to search it with Google though, by adding "site:abovetopsecret.com" to the query, and trying to be specific. Examples:

bird deaths site:abovetopsecret.com
wtc molten steel site:abovetopsecret.com
wtc 767 control flutter site:abovetopsecret.com

and most recently was very useful for this:
fake hotel saudi cnn platform site:abovetopsecret.com

You can often tell if it's going to be useful by looking at the Google snippet, then a quick scan of the tread often turns up useful stuff
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
http://skepticalhumanities.com/category/conspiracy-theory/

"[h=2]About Skeptical Humanities[/h]Someone new to the skeptical movement will immediately discover the large number of websites and discussions that are devoted to skepticism in science, and this is wonderful. It is important to realize, however, that the humanities also have scholarly standards that employ critical thinking and judgments based on the examination of evidence."



http://www.reddit.com/r/conspiratard/

http://illuminutti.com/about/

http://www.skepticsfieldguide.net/
 

Pete Tar

Senior Member
http://whatstheharm.net/index.html

Casualties of pseudo-science and misinformation...
haha.
 

Soulfly

Banned
Banned
I found this today.
http://guides.library.jhu.edu/content.php?pid=198142&sid=1657518
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
This website for educators provides a good definition of the various terms and how one can avoid the pitfall of claiming an opinion is fact.

Vocabulary - You will need to know and understand these terms before reading this section.
  • opinion: Personal preference that is not is not always the same for two or more people.
  • fact: A bit of information that is based on evidence.
  • science: Knowledge about the natural world that is based on evidence that is gathered systematically.
  • observation: A bit of information that is collected by using the 5 senses, sometimes with the help of technology.
  • data: Facts that have been uncovered scientifically by systematic observations or experimental tests.
  • inference: An interpretation of, or an opinion about, an observation.
  • test: An intentional effort to collect observations that may help answer a question.....
http://www.ck12.org/earth-science/Scientific-Explanations-and-Interpretations/lesson/user:chubbard/Science---Fact-or-Opinion%3F/
 

David Fraser

Senior Member
This website just popped up on my FB.
http://rbutr.com/

Rbutr.com, I can't access much on my phone but it looks like a nifty tool that tells you if a page content is rebutted and links to the source. Anywho have a look.
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
I Just came across this website with many useful links and resources at http://skeptiforum.org/

These are the categories, each of which has several links to reliable resources, articles, boards and forums; most of which many of the researchers at Metabunk are already familiar with. Take a gander.

How can we tell if an article is credible or full of baloney?
How can we tell if a study is good?
Where can we find research and full studies?
Who can we ask for help?
Who is reliable and who should we distrust?
What are some good science and skepticism websites?
Where can we learn more on critical thinking?
How can we use search engines better?
How does peer review work?
Where can we find some software tools?
 

Leifer

Senior Member
An advanced overview of many mathematical formulas,
and Aerospace engineering. (orbits and rockets).

http://web.csulb.edu/colleges/coe/ae/engr370i/

There are others, but this one is well-worded, in that even I can get a grasp of :confused:


It's a college course, Cal St. Long Beach, "ENGR 3701"
Instructors:
Dr. Adeline Schmitz (a.schmitz@csulb.edu)
Mrs. Asieh Jalali (ajalalif@csulb.edu)
Dr. Hamid Hefazi (hamid.hefazi@csulb.edu)

NOTE: t was last modified, 2006.
 

tadaaa

Senior Member
I Just came across this website with many useful links and resources at http://skeptiforum.org/

These are the categories, each of which has several links to reliable resources, articles, boards and forums; most of which many of the researchers at Metabunk are already familiar with. Take a gander.

How can we tell if an article is credible or full of baloney?
How can we tell if a study is good?
Where can we find research and full studies?
Who can we ask for help?
Who is reliable and who should we distrust?
What are some good science and skepticism websites?
Where can we learn more on critical thinking?
How can we use search engines better?
How does peer review work?
Where can we find some software tools?

I liked the linked video on that website

 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
This college Physics course has most of its materials available online. It is worth a look...

The Scientific Method - Critical and Creative Thinking
(Debunking Pseudoscience)


One of the many useful links found towards the bottom of the page: Fuzzy Thinking and PseudoScience

 
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SR1419

Senior Member
^Someone needs to post this on Dane's website....and Michael Murphy's...and Russ Tanner's...and Patrick Roddie's...and Max Bliss'...and....they need to understand it.
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
I'd like to add the website, Retraction Watch, to the list of "Links and Resources' thread. Purveyors of fear and misinformation will often cite a Retracted study or Pseudoscience when trying to make their case, the good folks at Retraction Watch have provided a valuable, searchable resource bringing attention to bad science and falsified studies.

Herndon's RETRACTED paper claiming that airplanes are spraying coal fly ash

Seralini's RETRACTED paper claiming harmful effects of genetically modified maize and the Roundup herbicide on rats


Infascelli's RETRACTED paper claiming GMO Dangers
 

Galan

New Member
I came across this site while looking for information on population growth over time.

http://ourworldindata.org/

Interesting data visualisation. From my limited research, it appears well referenced. An Economics website.

Max Roser – Economist, is the principle author. A 'data visualizational historian'.


Institution: Nuffield College, Oxford, Oxford Martin School

I am getting paranoid in my old age. The latest trend in web page design, making everything smart phone accessible, makes a lot of websites all look the same.

Happily this site is simple. No annoying advertisement feeds.

Hope it proves useful
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member
Fact Checking resources from The American Press Institute


These are the general categories

This is an example of a question within one of the above categories....

 

Whitebeard

Senior Member
I borrowed this book from my local library, and just finished reading it

https://www.amazon.co.uk/SECRET-SOCIETIES-Nick-Harding/dp/1904048412

Not a book that goes into any great detail, but it does offer an interesting overview of various organisations, real and imaginary, that the CT crowd like to drag out as proof of various global dodgy dealings, and it does so in a skeptical and hard nosed way. For example it looks at Bohemian Grove and concludes "..that it is just a glorified frat house for rich boys who miss their days at university..." and also concludes that the Illuminati is really "...a secret society that exists only as a heady fantasy in the fevered imaginations of conspiracy theorists.."

As I said, it's not a book for in depth study, but it does give some simple history lessons into various groups and societies and some handy simple debunkings into the wilder claims some CT's make about them

The same author has also penned a second volume on the subject...

Which I have just ordered on the off chance of a good read.

(he has also penned works on Atheism and urban legends)
 

CeruleanBlu

Active Member
This NASA project may have some possible future use by those in the chemtrail/geoengineering debunking activities.

http://www.nasa.gov/feature/ames/na...-sleuth-out-air-traffic-improvement-mysteries


I don't know what the availability of this flight information to the general public will be, but at least the information will be available to someone!
 

Knigel

New Member
Here is the updated link from the Skepti-Forum reference (A Guide to Kinda Looking Smart on the Internet: How to Find and Evaluate Online Information) shared in this thread above: https://nodesci.net/blog/2015/05/17/a-guide-to-kinda-looking-smart-on-the-internet-how-to-find-and-evaluate-online-information/

I've also started putting together a new collection of science and skepticism references in a wiki on Skepti-Forum (I've also added many of the links from this thread because they are great recommendations): http://skeptiforum.org/t/science-skepticism-reference-wiki/28

I make these lists mainly for my own reference, but have also found that they are useful to people exploring science and skepticism. I use these for anyone looking for a place to start. I know that many experienced skeptics already know most of this material and these organisations.

Here's a blurb from my article above explaining my reasoning further:
"We frequently talk about scientific issues because they are important to us. Each day we encounter hundreds of news articles and blog posts talking about science. For many of us, scientists cannot seem to make up their minds and everything is controversial. If we take a look at any one of the polarized issues in public science debates such as vaccines, GMOs, or climate change, two sides both present an abundance of scientific literature. If we look at both sides of the literature, we see that there are reputable professionals on each side and the research on both sides seems just as thorough as the other. We all need to talk about science although we may not be scientists ourselves. Science affects us all. However, one of the most frustrating issues for many of us is trying to find the information we need then figuring out if that information is reliable and credible. If people with an extensive science background cannot agree on scientific issues, how can the public distinguish the good information from the bad? Finding and evaluating information online is frustrating, but some of these following tools should make the detective work a little easier. Through investigation, and by challenging our own assumptions, we can often find that there really aren’t two sides to every story."
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member
Not a website, but a book.

Its by Dr Zakaria Erzinclioglu, who was A senior researcher in forensics at Cambridge University and director of the institute of forensic science at Durham University, consultant to police forces all over the UK and author of several books, both academic and popular on criminal investigation techniques.

This book gives a fairly easy to read over view of forensics, including everything from details of various wounds (stabbing, gun shot, impact etc) to stuff like DNA profiling and patterns of debris left from explosions.

Besides being an interesting and informative read, it contains some useful information for debunkers. A good example is in the chapter dealing with the effects of injuries on the human body. Among the examples given are a case of an Austrian man, stabbed in the heart by his wife during a domestic dispute, who refused an offer to get medical assistance, and calmly walked out of one room into another and sat down to watch TV, where he bled to death. There are several others given. A very handy source to have next time your confronted with a CT who claims that someone can't walk or run given 'that' type of injury.
 
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