Why all the UFO reports from the Navy, and not the Air Force?

Agent K

Senior Member
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas? This whole Metabunk forum is even called "UFO Videos and Reports from the US Navy." Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?
 

LarryLobster

New Member
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas? This whole Metabunk forum is even called "UFO Videos and Reports from the US Navy." Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?
The work of Kate Dorsch would help inform the answer to this question: the USAF has a long history of involvement w/UFOs, beginning with the Kenneth Arnold saucer fiasco back in the day. As she said in a recent discussion panel (41:57):
"that's because the air force … to disentangle itself at some point, and I suspect it's not super eager to jump back in."
 

Alphadunk

Active Member
Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?

Pretty much, yes. The Air Force is very hesitant to get themselves back into the UFO conversation whereas it's rather new for the Navy. Seeing unexplained "stuff" on ships has been par for the course for hundreds, if not thousands, of years so it kind of makes ironic sense that the Navy would be driving this junk.
 

Keith Beachy

Senior Member
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas? This whole Metabunk forum is even called "UFO Videos and Reports from the US Navy." Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?
USAF pilots are able to identify the UFO, we have better eyes? When we see something we figure out what it is?

Or... USAF pilots don't need to report UFOs, we don't need to escape months at sea, or are tired of difficult, nearly impossible landings on a postage stamp size runway pitching and moving after being referred to the Flight Doctor for issues related to reporting crazy stuff. It appears the Navy figured out they don't care if you report crazy stuff, you can't get out of sea duty!

Navy pilots are not Pilots, they are Naval Aviators. Aviators see more UFOs than Pilots... ?
 

lougiants

New Member
Probably because most of the sightings are at sea, and probably because a good number of these are China and Russia perfecting/advancing technology on some very basic drones and or balloons that are spying on US naval assets.

Note - majority of the sightings are near San Clemente island on the west coast and for the east coast Naval Air Station Oceana.

So IMHO, we are seeing electronic warfare games.

The next military engagement we are going to see is more than likely going to be naval

We are not dropping in Army Rangers or Marine Recon onto any island in the pacific if things continue to escalate over the coming years with China. The battle for supremacy in the South China sea is going to be warships...if it happens.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
Looks like their might have been a bit of flap mentality running through Navy pilots/personnel. It seems the leaks are from sightings during situations where (paraphrasing) "we were seeing them all the time, lots of them," which could predispose folks to interpreting an ambiguous sighting or contact as "another one of those UFOs everybody is seeing." So there MAY be a larger pool of sightings that are not just unidentified, but unidentified -with-all-the-trimmings, such as claims of impossible maneuvers and the like that do not show up in the videos.

As to why the Navy seems suddenly more prone to leaks of such items than the other service branches, unless they are all coming from some leaker with contacts with one of the UFO buffs who are running with them, I have no good hypothesis.
 

Alphadunk

Active Member
If the next military engagement is naval then someone is in for a very very bad time. America's naval spending and offensive capabilities are almost laughable when compared to the rest of the world. There is zero chance anyone would willingly draw America into a naval conflict IMO.
 

BrianHoltz

New Member
The battle for supremacy in the South China sea is going to be warships...if it happens.
Specifically, that would be U.S. carrier battle groups against China's land-based missiles and aircraft. China's sharply increasing capabilities are causing the U.S. Navy to question its ability to keep carrier battle groups close enough to China to be relevant. See e.g. https://tnsr.org/2020/11/the-u-s-navys-loss-of-command-of-the-seas-and-how-to-regain-it/:
As a result, the U.S. war plan is now to fight primarily from outside what is called the first island chain (of which Taiwan is a part)
 

jackfrostvc

Active Member
Why do people expect the NAVY or Airforce would be the ones to have defintive photographic proof of UFOs

Out of all pilots flying in the US, NAVY/Airforce pilots comprise about 5% of all US pilots.
Statistcally it's far more likely definitive UFO photos would come from the 95% of pilots (commercial, public etc)


I just don't get why people think the NAVY/Airforce are holding back definitive photographic proof etc.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
Statistcally it's far more likely definitive UFO photos would come from the 95% of pilots (commercial, public etc)
I believe most commercial pilots are prohibited from operating personal electronic equipment (including cameras) in the cockpit during the flight.

It's more common for military pilots to have camera equipment capable of tracking targets onboard, recordings of these cameras for mission debriefings, and mission profiles that allow for spending fuel on chasing these targets, PLUS more missions where chasing a target unknown to the pilots is the designed objective.

And due to the power of their sensors, their "low information zone" is further out.
 

jackfrostvc

Active Member
I believe most commercial pilots are prohibited from operating personal electronic equipment (including cameras) in the cockpit during the flight.

It's more common for military pilots to have camera equipment capable of tracking targets onboard, recordings of these cameras for mission debriefings, and mission profiles that allow for spending fuel on chasing these targets, PLUS more missions where chasing a target unknown to the pilots is the designed objective.

And due to the power of their sensors, their "low information zone" is further out.


The point here is that there is this claim out there that they have close up pictures that definatively prove alien craft. ie like the one claim aof a craft 50 feet from the cockpit

It's more likely that such pics would have been taken by commercial craft statisticlly if they existed, thus my confusion on the focus on military sightings for such

As we have seen in the past, pilots do take pics out the cockpit of their commerical jets. Like the Sphere over south america I think it was
But the point here, is that if a craft came that close to a 747 etc, 200 people would be taking pictures ie the passengers
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas?
Regarding the Air Force's lack of UFO reports:
Article:
From 1947 to 1969, the Air Force investigated Unidentified Flying Objects under Project Blue Book. The project, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, was terminated Dec. 17, 1969. [..]

With the termination of Project Blue Book, the Air Force regulation establishing and controlling the program for investigating and analyzing UFOs was rescinded. [..]

Since the termination of Project Blue Book, nothing has occurred that would support a resumption of UFO investigations by the Air Force. Given the current environment of steadily decreasing defense budgets, it is unlikely the Air Force would become involved in such a costly project in the foreseeable future. [..]

Persons wishing to report UFO sightings should be advised to contact local law enforcement agencies.

Though this may have changed this year:
Article:
To that end, Deputy Secretary of Defense Kathleen Hicks today directed the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security to develop a plan to formalize the mission currently performed by the UAPTF.

This plan will be developed in coordination with various DOD components, including the military departments and the combatant commands, and with ODNI and other interagency partners. The plan will establish procedures for synchronizing collection, reporting and analysis of UAP; provide recommendations for securing military test and training ranges; and identify requirements for the establishment and operation of a new follow-on DOD activity to lead the effort, including its alignment, resources, staffing, authorities, and a timeline for implementation.
 

Itsme

Active Member
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas? This whole Metabunk forum is even called "UFO Videos and Reports from the US Navy." Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?
You mean the ones of which video snippets were leaked to the public domain? We don't know where the others come from.

According to the UAPTF report:
No standardized reporting mechanism existed until the Navy established one in March 2019. The Air Force subsequently adopted that mechanism in November 2020, but it remains limited to USG reporting.
So the Air Force was 1.5 years later than the Navy in establishing a standardized reporting mechanism.

About the 144 USG reports that were investigated:
These reports describe incidents that occurred between 2004 and 2021, with the majority coming in the last two years as the new reporting mechanism became better known to the military aviation community.
So I guess some of them came from the Air Force as well, though the Navy had a head start because they established their reporting mechanism earlier.

Apparently, observations have been made prior to this reporting mechanism:
The UAPTF regularly heard anecdotally during its research about other observations that occurred but which were never captured in formal or informal reporting by those observers.
 

Lewis Doherty

New Member
Why are all these UFO sightings coming from the Navy off the coast of the U.S., and not from the Air Force or overseas? This whole Metabunk forum is even called "UFO Videos and Reports from the US Navy." Is the Navy more open about sightings or worse at identifying things?
The Navy's training and WEAPONS TESTING areas are at sea. They operate off carriers or naval air stations with a large number of observers. The Air Force can do things in the desert.
 

Vertigo

New Member
Out of all pilots flying in the US, NAVY/Airforce pilots comprise about 5% of all US pilots.
Statistcally it's far more likely definitive UFO photos would come from the 95% of pilots (commercial, public etc)
Cessna and Boeing 737 pilots dont have air to air radar or long range FLIR cameras and usually are not sent out to investigate or intercept some unidentified radar or other contact. Also, actual alien UFOs might be chasing or buzzing any type of plane, so if they existed, then Id say you are right: the odds would favor civilians; but if its humans chasing balloons or drones or atmospheric effects, or in fairness, actual aliens, then its almost always going to be the military.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
The Navy's training and WEAPONS TESTING areas are at sea. They operate off carriers or naval air stations with a large number of observers. The Air Force can do things in the desert.
I con't I understand your point here. Are you saying that the AF operates further afield from their base/station/carrier, and that this is significant? Or that ocean vs. desert is significant? Or something else that I am too slow to figure out this morning?:)
 

NorCal Dave

Senior Member.
The Navy's training and WEAPONS TESTING areas are at sea. They operate off carriers or naval air stations with a large number of observers. The Air Force can do things in the desert.
Not necessarily, Navel Air Station Fallon, home of TOPGUN, is in the middle of the Nevada:

Naval Air Station Fallon
Content from External Source
or NAS Fallon (IATA: NFL, ICAO: KNFL, FAA LID: NFL) is the United States Navy's premier air-to-air and air-to-ground training facility. It is located southeast of the city of Fallon in western Nevada. Since 1996, it has been home to the Naval Fighter Weapons School (TOPGUN) taking over from the former NAS Miramar, California, and the surrounding area contains 240,000 acres (97,000 ha) of bombing and electronic warfare ranges.
Content from External Source
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Air_Station_Fallon

And sometimes the Air Force trains at sea:

It is uncertain if the fall football classics between the U.S. Air Force Academy, U.S. Naval Academy and the U.S. Military Academy will take place this fall to determine who is awarded the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy, but this month such inter-service rivalries were put aside as the Air Force and Navy performed a joint exercise in the Black Sea. It focused on realistic integration, operation and communication between surface warships and air assets to protect the maritime domain.
Content from External Source
nationalinterest.org/blog/buzz/us-navy-and-air-force-are-training-war-black-sea-166318

Some of the classics of UFOlogy, Roswell, Dulce Base even Area 51 are all in desert areas.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
I con't I understand your point here. Are you saying that the AF operates further afield from their base/station/carrier, and that this is significant? Or that ocean vs. desert is significant? Or something else that I am too slow to figure out this morning?:)
I'd put the difference between land and sea at much better (civilian) radar coverage on land.
If some UAPs are foreign threats, it's much easier for them to slip by at sea.
And it's much more difficult to get data on objects on the ocean, see MH370, so they're harder to identify.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
And it's much more difficult to get data on objects on the ocean, see MH370, so they're harder to identify.
MH370, though, was not flying around in a testing/training area with an aircraft carrier and associated support vessels trying to track and identify it. I'd buy that a UFO flying along at some random point in the world might be more likely to escape detection if that spot happened to be over the ocean, but the majority of the Navy leaked reports are happening where they are (or would be expected to be) in the sights of a lot of sensors.

Not trying to be argumentative, just trying to get some grasp on this. My own "best guess" at the moment is the Navy pilots/crews got into a flap mentality that did not spread to the Air Force, and so saw and reported more UAP -- wher an AF pilot might think "Oh, another distant plane," and move on, Navy pilots in the middle of a flap might see the same and think "Oh, another one of those UFOs that everybody is seeing." But I'm not wedded to that if something else makes more sense.
 
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