This picture is not a Fukushima related fish die off

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
earlier, the same study found less than 1% of the sea floor covered with ‘detritus’.
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The sea floor IS detritus full stop. From sediments washed out to sea from rivers, to everything in the sea that dies, it ALL ends up on the bottom of the ocean. The famous White Cliffs Of Dover are made up of layers of dead sea creatures built up over millennia.

In fact large parts of Southern England are chalk.

And then to couple the 'shock horror' report to a cropped photograph that has nothing to do with the story. Just goes to show that this story is another example of the 'tinfoil hat' type of scare mongering a lot of the alternative so called 'news' sources thrive on.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
The "98% of sea floor covered in dead creatures, up from 1%" is covered in depth here:
https://www.metabunk.org/threads/de...-ocean-floor-up-from-1-before-fukushima.2872/
You can already see the story is not being reported at all accurately by Jones, et al. The study is nothing to do with Fukushima, and instead is about the effects of global warming on the ocean.

Fukushima happened in March 2011. The Figures of 1% and 98% simply relate to a seasonal surge of salp detritus (mostly fecal matter and the dead bodies of salps) at one spot that happened a year later. Important to note that the 1% figure was also a year after Fukushima.
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derwoodii

Senior Member.
And then to couple the 'shock horror' report to a cropped photograph that has nothing to do with the story. Just goes to show that this story is another example of the 'tinfoil hat' type of scare mongering a lot of the alternative so called 'news' sources thrive on.


yes sadly true, i just followed the trail of the post origin to end up in Ecuador at Kacper posawski shop where he wants to sell me all kinds of salves ointments and balms
 

Hevach

Senior Member.
I've seen stuff like that in Michigan. Those shad breed like crazy and grow fast, and they don't really seem to do that well in bad winters, so you see winter and spring die offs a lot. It's not pollution (radioactive or otherwise), because it's almost entirely limited to the shad. Bass live everywhere they do (young shad are a big prey/bait fish for largemouth bass) but you almost never see bass die off along with them.

Gladwin used to have a special once-a-year sanitation program to clean up the shores of the various lakes in the area (they might still for all I know) - Sanford Lake and Wixom Lake seemed to have shad kills almost every spring when I went there in the 90's.

Killed my sad attempts at teenage romance a couple times - finally got this one girl to at least take a walk and the beach was ankle deep in reeking dead fish.
 
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