Las Vegas Concert Mass Shooting

derwoodii

Senior Member.
i not seen this & its quite worthy of time spent watching and listening...
Part one is the how, in part two he discusses his frustration with conspiracy claims & posts that wastes his officers time chasing rabbits down holes

George Knapp interviews Sheriff Joe Lombardo

http://www.lasvegasnow.com/news/web-extra-george-knapp-interviews-sheriff-joe-lombardo/849308034

Posted: Nov 01, 2017 06:57 PM PDT


Part 2.
4:45 knapp:"some of the conspiracies deal with you, you're in league witht he MGM. "
 
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deirdre

Senior Member.

“I’m the guy that sold ammunition to Stephen Paddock,” Haig said
......
The Review-Journal, along with other media outlets, sought the ruling from District Judge Elissa Cadish, who on Tuesday unsealed records related to the Route 91 Harvest festival shooting.
....

In her original order issued Tuesday morning, Cadish unsealed documents with the understanding that, among “minimal redactions,” Haig’s name would be blacked out.

“In this case, Stephen Paddock has been determined by law enforcement authorities to be the lone shooter and the only one involved in the planning of the shooting, and he shot himself in connection with the October 1 events,” Cadish wrote. “However, there is an ongoing investigation regarding possible charges against another individual arising out of information obtained in connection with the October 1 shooting, but not directly related to the shooting itself. Thus, the Court must be cautious not to reveal documents which would interfere with that investigation and possible charges, as well as avoid threatening the privacy interests and safety of an individual mentioned in the sealed documents.”
https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime...2nd-person-of-interest-in-las-vegas-shooting/
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pony

New Member
More interesting that Haig, in my opinion, is the testimony that SWAT officers actually observed Stephen Paddock take his own life.

From the article deirdre posted above, "But a document that details a telephonic search warrant request from 3:02 a.m. on Oct. 2 said that “as SWAT officers breached room 135, they observed Stephen Paddock place a gun to his head and fire one round.”

This completely runs against what we've been told about the breech, which was that Paddock was dead when SWAT entered the room.

That was the official story right up until Las Vegas Metro released their official [preliminary] report only a week or so ago.


The decision was made to use an explosive breach to make entry into room 32-135.

After a successful breach of the doors to room 32-135, officers entered the room and found
Paddock deceased on the floor.

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Yet another major adjustment to an already confusing and suspicious timeline.

[edited to adhere to no-click policy]
 
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deirdre

Senior Member.
Yet another major adjustment to an already confusing and suspicious timeline
its not that suspicious. if you read the whole paragraph
But a document that details a telephonic search warrant request from 3:02 a.m. on Oct. 2 said that “as SWAT officers breached room 135, they observed Stephen Paddock place a gun to his head and fire one round.”
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you'll see the warrant was written.. what 4 hours after the breach? There was a lot going on, a lot of officers on scene, etc. So whoever wrote the warrant paraphrased the 'swat' team wrong.

SWAT could have said something like "yea he put a gun to his head and killed himself. One round"... because that is what you would assume had happened if you walk into a room and see a guy on the ground with a bullet hole in his head and a gun next to him. And the officer in charge of the warrant thought that meant they saw him. This isn't the movies where actors are reading off a script and can read the other actors parts as well. Humans in real life misinterpret things once in a while in the midst of chaos. It would be more suspicious if they didn't.
 

pony

New Member
Humans in real life misinterpret things once in a while in the midst of chaos.

One could argue, however, that this wasn't Joe and Jane Average off the street, these are tactically trained law-enforcement officers who have encountered situations like this many times before, through both training and real-world experience.

I would expect that, given their knowledge and experience, they would be able to know the different between simply finding a body and actually observing someone placing a gun to their had and firing one round.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
they would be able to know the different between simply finding a body and actually observing someone placing a gun to their had and firing one round.
what part of 'the guy who wrote out the warrant, probably misinterpreted the team' did I not enunciate clearly enough?.

edited a bit for clarity.
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
...suspicious timeline.
Okay, while I can comprehend how different witnesses--with different sightlines, etc.--
could describe differently, say, watching a body collapse, a second after a loud breach explosion,
with a gun in the hand...what difference, in the big picture, is there if Paddock was seen
a second before he pulled the trigger, a second after, or 3 seconds later?
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
The officer that authored the search warrant (who was one of the guys who breached the room) explained the situation today

MacDonald, the sergeant who sought the search warrant and also helped author the preliminary investigative report, said the warrant request was the first he authored after the shooting.

“That night was crazy. You get information coming in. It’s fluid, and none of it is confirmed,” he said. “And that’s par for the course when you’re doing telephonic search warrants. You base those search warrants based on what you believed up to that point.”

MacDonald said it became clear as the investigation unfolded that none of the officers saw the gunman shoot himself, and that he was dead before officers entered the room.

“No one witnessed that act,” MacDonald said.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime...e-clear-up-details-about-gunmans-oct-1-death/
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NoParty

Senior Member.
The officer that authored the search warrant (who was one of the guys who breached the room) explained the situation today

MacDonald, the sergeant who sought the search warrant and also helped author the preliminary investigative report, said the warrant request was the first he authored after the shooting.

“That night was crazy. You get information coming in. It’s fluid, and none of it is confirmed,” he said. “And that’s par for the course when you’re doing telephonic search warrants. You base those search warrants based on what you believed up to that point.”

MacDonald said it became clear as the investigation unfolded that none of the officers saw the gunman shoot himself, and that he was dead before officers entered the room.

“No one witnessed that act,” MacDonald said.
https://www.reviewjournal.com/crime...e-clear-up-details-about-gunmans-oct-1-death/
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Well, the good news is that MacDonald's is a remarkably straightforward explanation of potentially very confusing situation.

The bad news is that the apparent contradiction--for those who truly want to believe things are
never as they seem--is big enough to inspire 500 dopey YouTube videos with spooky music...
 

deirdre

Senior Member.

CHANDLER, Ariz. — An Arizona man who sold ammunition to the gunman in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history was charged Friday with manufacturing armor-piercing bullets, according to court documents obtained by The Associated Press.

Unfired armor-piercing bullets found inside the Las Vegas hotel room where the attack was launched on Oct. 1 contained the fingerprints of ammunition dealer Douglas Haig of Arizona, according to the complaint filed in federal court in Phoenix. It says Haig didn't have a license to manufacture armor-piercing ammunition.
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http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/ma...r-is-charged/ar-BBICMHt?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=ientp
 

pony

New Member
Interesting development, I hope I have this no-click rule figured out.

From this article:

https://www.ktnv.com/news/las-vegas...ce-evidence-body-cam-footage-must-be-released

A judge in Las Vegas has ordered police to release 911 calls, body camera video and several other records that the department had sought to keep from the public until it concluded the investigation into last year's 1 October shooting...

Nevada state court Judge Richard Scotti on Wednesday ruled the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department must begin releasing records to media organizations, which had sought them since hours after the Oct. 1 shooting.
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