"How fake images change our memory and behaviour" (BBC)

SR1419

Senior Member.
Here is another example of how fallible memory can be:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/15/n...er-attack-show-the-power-of-false-memory.html


There is no evidence that the mistaken accounts of either person were malicious or intentionally false. Studies of memories of traumatic events consistently show how common it is for errors to creep into confidently recalled accounts, according to cognitive psychologists.

“It’s pretty normal,” said Deryn Strange, an associate psychology professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “That’s the hard thing to get our heads around. It’s frightening how easy it is to build in a false memory.”
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JRBids

Senior Member.
" The feeling that you have been chosen by intelligent beings for research of contact, is also a feeling that you are special and different than others. "

From Chew's link.

sounds like chemtrail believers.
 

BombDr

Senior Member.
According to Lt Col Dave Grossman, a former US Army Ranger and psychology professor at West Point, memory lapses and invented fragments are common when under stress. From his book "On Combat[ The psychology and physiology of deadly conflict in war and peace":

Nearly half of all law enforcement officers involved in deadly force encounters experience 'missing frames', that is significant chunks of memory lost from their event. Dr Alexis Artwohl found that 47% of officers in a gunfight experience memory loss of at least part of their actions. Dr Dave Klinger's research found that if you fire only one or two shots, you usually remember the number. But as you fire more rounds, there is an increasing tendency to forgrt how many you shot.

Dr Artwohl says that memories of high-risk situations are often like a series of snapshots, some vivid, some blurry and some even missing.
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This actually ties in with my experience, as I do not remember key events from Afghanistan, yet my friends do. Similarly I remember parts that they do not.

According to Dr Artwohl, 21% of police officers involved in shootings experience memory distortions. In other words, more that one in five officers in a gunfight remembered something that did not happen.

If hardened soldiers and highly trained police officers are walking away from combat situations believing something happened that did not, might citizens and suspects also believe with all their heart that something happened that really did not? You bet.
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This is significant, as CTs are often fixated on a single point, such as what Barry Jennings said about seeing dead bodies in WTC7, or 'people heard explosions', or 'many reports of shots from the grassy-knoll', and use this small human frailty as the cornerstone of their entire case.
 

Efftup

Senior Member.
bu t often with the don;t remember stuff, it;s more that they just never paid attention to it. Nobody, when you were 14 years old came up to you and said "ALWAYS make very careful observations of EVERYTHING you do, and remember to take notes cos you will be tested on it in 30 years time"
I was always interested in planes and the sky so I DID notice contrails.

Interesting though that in 20 years time when the food conspiracy comes along and people say "i never used to eat food like that!" You will then just be able to dig up Facebook archives and prove them wrong.

I DO have a very clear memory of my Auntie babysitting with her friend. (part of my memory says it was her black friend (unusual to see a black person in Salisbury back then) but the very distinct memory says her name was Sue.
I'm sure discussing this with my aunt she doesn't remember a friend named Sue.
My brother and I shouted "Maria!! Sue!!" and then when they came upstairs we pretended to be asleep. I really don't know HOW MANY times we did this but it was obviously a few.
So did she forget having a friend named SUE, or did I implant a false memory of a friend?
 

tadaaa

Senior Member
Yeah me too, I do remember looking up at planes making contrails, when growing up in the 70's

I used to think it was a great way of working out the direction the planes were traveling in, it always seemed quite romantic to watch planes heading out over the Atlantic, to the Americas
 

Chew

Senior Member.
I grew up on Guam. Aircraft only flew to or away from it, never high enough over it to generate contrails. I never saw contrails until we moved back to the States. They stuck out like a sore thumb.
 

LREKing

New Member
I grew up outside Phoenix in the early '60s and remember the contrails from Luke AFB overhead. My dad had been a fighter pilot in WW2 and it's likely we discussed them.

Speaking of self-delusion, anyone not already familiar with the following site should take a look.

http://youarenotsosmart.com/author/davidmcraney/

I enjoy his podcasts during my walks.
 

cloudspotter

Senior Member.
We're planning our wedding for next year and talking about ways of decorating the hall we've booked.

Having visited the hall earlier this year and looked at photos I would have sworn the ceiling that we are planning on attaching bunting, fair lights etc to was open with exposed trusses a bit like this:



This is what it actually looks like:



Not a truss in sight. Anywhere.


It the outside we're more interested in anyway ;)

 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
We're planning our wedding for next year
Congratulations!

Having visited the hall earlier this year and looked at photos I would have sworn the ceiling that we are planning on attaching bunting, fair lights etc to was open with exposed trusses a bit like this:

Do you think your memory was warped by looking at other photos? There are pages that show that location and others, and you might have looked at a similar image
Whalton.jpg
 

cloudspotter

Senior Member.
Congratulations!

Thanks :)

Do you think your memory was warped by looking at other photos? There are pages that show that location and others, and you might have looked at a similar image
Whalton.jpg

Possibly, but we already knew that would be our venue if we ever did get around to getting married so didn't really look around at other places. Or it could be that's the sort of ceiling I expect in halls like that from past experience. Or a combination of those.

Either way I was sure that the trusses were exposed and could actually picture it in my head with the rest of the interior pretty much spot on
 

Spectrar Ghost

Senior Member.
Congrats as well!

Could be that the angled sides made it seem likely that the ceiling continued up at angles, and thus trusses would be reasonable?
 
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