Statement by AARO Head Sean Kirkpatrick on the HOC UAP Hearing

Yes.
But the DNI was never required.
Not relevant to my point.
Your original point was:
as well as toned down the language from "require" to "ensure".
Since the DNI shall now ensure, but was not previously required, the language was not "toned down", but places a greater burden on the DNI. (This was my original point.)


DNI cannot require anything from any government entities or components outside his line organization not ranked below him unless specifically authorized by the code of law. DoD is outside his/her line organization.
Hence,
The Director of National Intelligence, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, shall ensure
Content from External Source
But also this "code of law":
Article:
Sec. 102A. [50 U.S.C. §403-1]

(a) Access to Intelligence.—Unless otherwise directed by the President, the Director of National Intelligence shall have access to all national intelligence and intelligence related to the national security which is collected by any Federal department, agency, or other entity, except as otherwise provided by law or, as appropriate, under guidelines agreed upon by the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. [...]

(f) Tasking and Other Authorities.—

(1)(A) The Director of National Intelligence shall—

(i) establish objectives, priorities, and guidance for the intelligence community to ensure timely and effective collection, processing, analysis, and dissemination (including access by users to collected data consistent with applicable law and, as appropriate, the guidelines referred to in subsection (b) and analytic products generated by or within the intelligence community) of national intelligence; [...]

(g) Intelligence Information Sharing.—

(1) The Director of National Intelligence shall have principal authority to ensure maximum availability of and access to intelligence information within the intelligence community consistent with national security requirements. [...]

This boils down to the authority to require certain information to be shared.

Also, § 3373a still applies.
 
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Your original point was:

Since the DNI shall now ensure, but was not previously required, the language was not "toned down"

It's less of a legal burden for the subject of DNI data requests to comply, especially if the DNI intends to request UAP data from DoD components.

That was my original point of 'toning down' which you have in no way refuted.

Also, § 3373a still applies.

To AARO in conflict with 3373? Let me be clear if you're seriously claiming some conflated double mandate for AARO based on these two different codes?
 
It's less of a legal burden for the subject of DNI data requests to comply, especially if the DNI intends to request UAP data from DoD components.

That was my original point of 'toning down' which you have in no way refuted.



To AARO in conflict with 3373? Let me be clear if you're seriously claiming some conflated double mandate for AARO based on these two different codes?
Technically they're not overlapping codes, they cover entirely different things.

AARO itself is also covered by 3373, in general. 3373a is also applicable to them as recognized by Congress.

https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/senate-bill/1605/text
Screenshot (2127).png

https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/7776/text
Screenshot (2128).png
 
Compare:
Article:
NASIC’s mission is to discover and characterize air, space, missile, and cyber threats to enable full-spectrum multi-domain operations, drive weapon system acquisition, and inform national defense policy. [..]

NASIC provides authoritative, engineering-level scientific and technical intelligence on air, space, missile, and cyber threats. The center’s team of trusted subject matter experts deliver unique collection, exploitation, and analytic capabilities not found elsewhere. The center is tasked with discovering and characterizing advanced threats to enable full-spectrum, multi-domain operations against peer adversaries.
As you know, NASIC is a US Air Force military intelligence unit and AARO is under the Office of the Secretary of Defence. More than one alphabet soup agency with overlapping or overarching remits is nothing new.

DoD Announces the Establishment of the All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office — defense.gov, 2022-06-20
The mission of the AARO will be to synchronize efforts across the Department of Defense, and with other U.S. federal departments and agencies, to detect, identify and attribute objects of interest in, on or near military installations, operating areas, training areas, special use airspace and other areas of interest, and, as necessary, to mitigate any associated threats to safety of operations and national security. This includes anomalous, unidentified space, airborne, submerged and transmedium objects.

The AARO Executive Council (AAROEXEC), led by Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence & Security (USD(I&S)) Ronald Moultrie, will provide oversight and direction to the AARO along these primary lines of effort:

1. Surveillance, Collection and Reporting
2. System Capabilities and Design
3. Intelligence Operations and Analysis
4. Mitigation and Defeat
5. Governance
6. Science and Technology

Trying to identify and understand unidentified anomalous phenomenon is included. Have NASIC or other intelligence units been ignoring anomalous phenomenon in the past? I think not. Searching for threats requires looking for "the new" in new ways at all times, to try and understand if it is a threat.

If NASIC can't understand some observation then it should be sent upstream to AARO, but so would reports of explained threats. AARO anthology reports would have to include both the explained and the unexplained.
 
Trying to identify and understand unidentified anomalous phenomenon is included. Have NASIC or other intelligence units been ignoring anomalous phenomenon in the past? I think not. Searching for threats requires looking for "the new" in new ways at all times, to try and understand if it is a threat.
Proof:
Article:
Jonathan Grey is a generational officer of the United States Intelligence Community with a Top-Secret Clearance who currently works for the National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC), where the analysis of UAP has been his focus.
 

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