Flashing light in Night Vision

flarkey

Senior Member.
Staff member
This video was filmed recently at the 1st Annual UAP Conciseness Connection at the Monroe Institute, June 2022

Source: https://youtu.be/uByuadfNNGU

The shorter 1 minute wide angle night vision version showing the laser spotting the flashing object: https://youtu.be/BHpwuZKmmV4 We are super strict on the use of lasers on a skywatch .. always drawing circles around an object & NEVER directly at it. I (Rob) was hit by a laser from the ground, while looking out of an airplane window about 5 minutes after takeoff, about 5,000’ feet up. The flash is unbelievable & I understand totally the danger to pilots if it hits their eyes. Watch the shorter version where it's explained about the laser in a screen overlay: https://youtu.be/BHpwuZKmmV4 A big thank you to David Broadwell who organized this event, our fellow attendees & others who put on great presentations & our trainer Bob Holbrook from the Monroe Institute, who took us to deeper "Alpha" levels. https://www.monroeinstitute.org

Not sure of the locations but at 2m11s it says...

1654682231613.png

Any thoughts on what it could be...?
 
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Ann K

Senior Member.
I do not know the magnification, but the apparent motion of the blinker against the stars could be the motion of the stars against a stationary object instead. If that's the case, the stars are moving east to west, and their camera is pointed in a general southward direction.
 

Ravi

Senior Member.
I do not know the magnification, but the apparent motion of the blinker against the stars could be the motion of the stars against a stationary object instead. If that's the case, the stars are moving east to west, and their camera is pointed in a general southward direction.

The only thing I can think of that could potentially create this effect is a (close to) geostationary defunct satellite. When not controlled, a satellite can tumble in any direction. The reflection of the sun (if possible at that time and altitude) could produce the blink pattern. Of course, I have no examples.
 

flarkey

Senior Member.
Staff member
The only thing I can think of that could potentially create this effect is a (close to) geostationary defunct satellite. When not controlled, a satellite can tumble in any direction. The reflection of the sun (if possible at that time and altitude) could produce the blink pattern. Of course, I have no examples.
What about a weather balloon or Loon ballon at altitude? Do they have a flashing light (visible or IR) to aid retrieval when they fall back to earth?
 

Easy Muffin

Senior Member
I can only assume that is was filmed at their Virginia Campus:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/T...=2ahUKEwjrlczL9p34AhXTTcAKHVDdCmAQ_BJ6BAhXEAU

37.86002199995235, -78.83049207224886
Certainly matches well with the horizon at the start of the video they linked in the description.

1.jpg

http://peakvisor.com/panorama.html?...206&alt=218&yaw=-149.27&pitch=4.60&hfov=60.00

Also chimes with the stars you'd see standing there and looking in that direction. The bright star at the beginning of that video is Menkent, about to set in the SW. The flashing thing is on Ophiuchus towards the SE.
 

Ann K

Senior Member.
The only thing I can think of that could potentially create this effect is a (close to) geostationary defunct satellite. When not controlled, a satellite can tumble in any direction. The reflection of the sun (if possible at that time and altitude) could produce the blink pattern. Of course, I have no examples.
Well, we could all "send our intentions" up into the sky to recreate the effect, couldn't we? :D
 

FatPhil

Senior Member.
The only thing I can think of that could potentially create this effect is a (close to) geostationary defunct satellite. When not controlled, a satellite can tumble in any direction. The reflection of the sun (if possible at that time and altitude) could produce the blink pattern. Of course, I have no examples.

Graveyard orbits are barely (just less than 1%) larger than GEO orbits, so if it was a parked dead tumbler, a brief observation wouldn't be able to detect that it's non-GEO. Of course, they're at a fixed elevation if they're really GEO, but they could be GSO instead, and again a small deviation from the equator wouldn't be detectable from a short observation.

Parked satellites all support the good old-fashioned Gravity 2.0 protocol, so should be findable night after night.
 

jarlrmai

Senior Member
1654704114892.png
It's right near the band of geostat satellites..

Object highlighted is the star on the left of the object HIP 85365
 

flarkey

Senior Member.
Staff member
https://nova.astrometry.net/user_images/5982179#annotated

This is the the portion of the sky being observed
Stellarium with satellite DBs is not giving anything for that time and date, are we certain it was right, sometimes people get the day wrong when its just past midnight..

Cool. I didnt think this had worked but I checked it here and it looks like a good match.



This was my attempt with a black and white image and it is the same location.

https://nova.astrometry.net/user_images/5982030#original
 

flarkey

Senior Member.
Staff member
It would appear that Nimitz Incident experiencer Sean Cahill was present at the event...

Screenshot_20220609-152401_Twitter.jpg
 

Easy Muffin

Senior Member
Stellarium with satellite DBs is not giving anything for that time and date, are we certain it was right, sometimes people get the day wrong when its just past midnight..

1654703603820.png
2022/5/31 00:20 local (Virgina EDT)
The time seems close enough compared to the simulated view.

a.jpg

The horizon isn't aligned here but that'll depend on how far down that meadow they went. The important thing to note here is that the ridgeline is parallel in both views, ie the horizon in GE is level with the horizon in the telescope. The stars line up which wouldn't be possible if the time gap were too large. Anything between 00:10 and 00:40 local time seemed like a good match - this one here as you can see is from 00:30 (04:30 UTC).

This is how much the object drifts in 6 mins or so...

1654703945162.png
That seems to match the speed of an object near GEO altitude.

Six minutes between these:
b.jpg

c.jpg

This is not to say it's one of the sats in these shots but they do move across the sky at comparable speed. The flasher is also a little bit off to the side so to speak - I don't know enough about this topic but I could imagine that a spent rocket casing or something like that might end up there.

Also funnily enough, there's the TDRS-9 sat coming into view on the bottom right, which Wiki has this to say about:
When orbit raising operations resumed on 19 March, it was estimated that it would take two months to raise the satellite's orbit. It was later discovered that only using fuel from the number one tank upset the satellite's center of mass, causing the satellite to tumble when its main engines were fired. Controllers were able to compensate for this, however it took longer to raise the orbit as a result.
So yeah, these things do happen, at least temporarily.
 
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