Chemtrails Global Skywatch facebook discussion

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
This is what has them all in a tizzy today:


Clearly the Matrix can only be perceived when you are in a car.

I think that's the type of thing where a lot of people will simply be unable to be convinced otherwise. You can clearly see the plane is not moving, so any explanation involving scale, speed, perspective, and parallax is entirely irrelevant.

For most people it's an entertaining little optical illusion (like the moon following you). For some people it's just more evidence that reality is fake.
 

captfitch

Senior Member.
"When he was 6 he believed that the moon overhead followed him. By nine he had deciphered the illusion, trading magic for facts.... No trade-backs. So this is what it's like to be an adult. If he only knew now, what he knew then."

Sometimes the love affair with the magic makes people feel great. I wish I still thought the moon followed me home at night.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
"When he was 6 he believed that the moon overhead followed him. By nine he had deciphered the illusion, trading magic for facts.... No trade-backs. So this is what it's like to be an adult. If he only knew now, what he knew then."

Sometimes the love affair with the magic makes people feel great. I wish I still thought the moon followed me home at night.

There's a broad chasm to cross between the childhood love of magic and an adult love of science. Most people leave magic behind. Some make it all the way across to science. Most lose the need for wonder. Some go back to magic. Some never leave.
 

captfitch

Senior Member.
I often wonder what the biological advantage is of having a few members of a group believe in conspiracy theories. Did we need someone in our evolutionary past to think there was a predator in the bushes? Even if there was no predator there? The food wasn't always good to eat, even if it was? Maybe it was to keep us from becoming complacent.

Is there already a discussion on this here?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I often wonder what the biological advantage is of having a few members of a group believe in conspiracy theories. Did we need someone in our evolutionary past to think there was a predator in the bushes? Even if there was no predator there? The food wasn't always good to eat, even if it was? Maybe it was to keep us from becoming complacent.

Is there already a discussion on this here?

That's kind of the gist of Michael Shermer's books
http://www.michaelshermer.com/the-believing-brain/
 

captfitch

Senior Member.
Makes me wish I flew more so I had more time to read books like that. But I wonder if he discusses it from a group perspective, I've heard many answers to why people believe on an individual level. I'm interested in why one out of 1000 believes something.
 

JRBids

Senior Member.
"That's a lamp post". LOL that is too much. Yesterday one conspiracy related page was accusing TPTB of causing them to double post on FB.
 

Mumbles

Active Member
"When he was 6 he believed that the moon overhead followed him. By nine he had deciphered the illusion, trading magic for facts.... No trade-backs. So this is what it's like to be an adult. If he only knew now, what he knew then."

Nice reference, that's a great track :)
 

Cairenn

Senior Member.
The same here with me and seeing the Dallas tornado in 1957 from about a 1/2 mile away encouraged that. My mom tended to allow the weather to frighten her--my dad told a story about coming in from work to find her wearing a raincoat and with her umbrella open, in the house because she was afraid a storm would take the roof off. Someone had to keep their head on straight in Texas springs, and since it wasn't going to be my mom, it had to be me, since my dad was at work.
 
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