Article: "EXCLUSIVE: CIA's secret office has conducted UFO retrieval missions on at least NINE crash sites around the world, whistleblowers reveal"

SuppaCoup

Active Member
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ce-UFO-retrieval-missions-whistleblowers.html
A secretive CIA office has been coordinating the retrieval of crashed UFOs around the world for decades, multiple sources told DailyMail.com.

One source said that at least nine apparent 'non-human craft' have been recovered by the US government – some wrecked from a crash, and two completely intact.

Three sources briefed on those alleged top secret operations told DailyMail.com that the Office of Global Access (OGA), a wing of the Central Intelligence Agency's Science and Technology Directorate, has played a central role since 2003 in orchestrating the collection of what could be alien spacecraft.
I think this sentence is important-
The three sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid reprisals, have all been briefed by individuals involved in those alleged UFO retrieval missions.
So the people actually allegedly involved won't talk to the journalists directly, and we get nothing but vague, fuzzy statements about the alien crafts aside from them offering that they have some kind of cloaking ability the CIA knows how to see through. I mean, can we at least get someone to leak what the craft are made out of? Dimensions? Anything about how they might be powered? They're allegedly holding intact crafts but we've never gotten a sketch of what the inside looks like even with people leaking info? I think that lack of any concrete detai lthat would be easily communicated by anyone who worked with them directly is pretty telling-because if the three people give wildly divergent accounts of what the craft look like then things start to get fishy.

[Moderator note: url changed to show source. ]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ce-UFO-retrieval-missions-whistleblowers.html

I think this sentence is important-

So the people actually allegedly involved won't talk to the journalists directly, and we get nothing but vague, fuzzy statements about the alien crafts aside from them offering that they have some kind of cloaking ability the CIA knows how to see through. I mean, can we at least get someone to leak what the craft are made out of? Dimensions? Anything about how they might be powered? They're allegedly holding intact crafts but we've never gotten a sketch of what the inside looks like even with people leaking info? I think that lack of any concrete detai lthat would be easily communicated by anyone who worked with them directly is pretty telling-because if the three people give wildly divergent accounts of what the craft look like then things start to get fishy.
Don't hide the URL. Especially when it is as fishy as the Daily Mail.
 
Don't hide the URL. Especially when it is as fishy as the Daily Mail.
Okay. My quote clearly identifies the source as the daily mail in the first sentence, I absolutely wasn't trying to hide where this article comes from, just an innocent habit of how I often format links on other websites. I'll keep in mind this place having more strict requirements in the future.
 
So people who have hearsay information about a CIA program go talk to a UK tabloid?
Yeah, right...

The Messenger headline reflects my thoughts:
Article:

The CIA Has Secretly Retrieved UFOs, Say Anonymous Sources With Zero Evidence



The OGA seems to actually exist:
Article:
2003

création de :

Office of Global Access : soutien à la collecte et aux opérations techniques

auto-translated: "Office of Global Access: collection and technical operations support". This is not a new addition to that page.

It's kinda hard to find out what OGA does, even when I add -UFO to my Google search terms.
 
So people who have hearsay information about a CIA program go talk to a UK tabloid?
Yeah, right...

The Messenger headline reflects my thoughts:
Article:

The CIA Has Secretly Retrieved UFOs, Say Anonymous Sources With Zero Evidence



The OGA seems to actually exist:
Article:
2003

création de :

Office of Global Access : soutien à la collecte et aux opérations techniques

auto-translated: "Office of Global Access: collection and technical operations support". This is not a new addition to that page.

It's kinda hard to find out what OGA does, even when I add -UFO to my Google search terms.

"collection and technical operations support" ?? (emphasis added) Sounds to me like its the CIA's in-house Travel Office.

Every agency has a travel office, so they can get the best prices (government rate) on airline tickets and hotels.
 
The OGA seems to actually exist:
Article:
2003

création de :

Office of Global Access : soutien à la collecte et aux opérations techniques

auto-translated: "Office of Global Access: collection and technical operations support". This is not a new addition to that page.

It's kinda hard to find out what OGA does, even when I add -UFO to my Google search terms.

I wouldn't consider a single non-corroborated minority-language wiki page to be any more reliable than the Daily Mail, to be honest.

My web searching found the existence of a couple of people who've claimed to work for OGA:
Throughout his career, Mr. Wolfe held multiple CIA positions, among them were Deputy Director for Acquisition, Technology, and Facilities at the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI); Deputy Director of the Office of Global Access (OGA), and program manager overseeing the end-to-end system acquisition of an innovative new source and method for the Intelligence Community.
Content from External Source
-- https://bgsdc.com/team/doug-wolfe/
Prior to her position in DoD, Ms. Modica spent nearly three years at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) working as a Technical Intelligence Officer in the Office of Global Access in the Directorate for Science and Technology (DS&T). She was the program manager for one of the CIA DS&T’s largest development efforts.
Content from External Source
-- https://www.aoe.vt.edu/people/advisory/roni-modica.html
Expanding the search out to the DS&T yielded this, from 2003, the year your above citation indicates the OGA was formed:
https://www.cia.gov/readingroom/docs/CIA-RDP80B01676R000300040004-3.pdf
And I here quote in entirety everything that that 11-page document says about the OGA, complete with full surrounding context:

Content from External Source
Colour me as-yet unconvinced. I notice that both Doug Wolfe, the overseeer of the acquisition of a method - superimpressive, and Roni Modica both have VT connections (he has a "master’s degree in system engineering from Virginia Tech" from the above link, she's, well. just check the URL, but also "In 1989, Ms. Modica received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Aerospace Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University." - same institution, that's its old name), so it's not impossible that they know each other, and therefore right now I'm not excluding the idea that one of them made it up to pad his or her CV, and the other one liked the idea and just copied it.
 
...a single non-corroborated minority-language wiki page...

Just as a side note, that particular quoted section was in the very original version of the page:
https://fr.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Direction_de_la_science_et_technologie&oldid=76806260
Ceci est une version archivée de cette page, en date du 19 mars 2012 à 11:28 et modifiée en dernier par Rob1bureau
Content from External Source
Whose sources:
Sources

principalement extrait de The Wizards Of Langley de Jeffrey T. Richelson, appendix 2 p. 295-298
informations post-2002 trouvées dans la dernière édition (2011) de The US Intelligence Community du même Jeffrey T. Richelson
Robert Wallace et H. Keith Melton, Spycraft : The Secret History of the CIA's Spytechs, from Communism to Al-Qaeda
Content from External Source
alas hamper deeper online diving.
 
The US Intelligence Community du même Jeffrey T. Richelson
adding that author to my search improved the quality of the results

First, to get it out of the way:
https://www.dni.gov/files/NCSC/documents/ci/CI_Glossary.pdf
SmartSelect_20231129-135656_Samsung Notes.jpg
SmartSelect_20231129-135633_Samsung Notes.jpg

But the OGA does exist, and seems to have redacted parts of this document:
https://www.nsa.gov/portals/75/docu...ed-documents/cryptologic-histories/EC-121.pdf
SmartSelect_20231129-135031_Samsung Notes.jpg
Example of a redaction (there are many more):
SmartSelect_20231129-135201_Samsung Notes.jpg
I lack the knowledge to conclude from these redactions what the OGA might be interested in.

The Daily Mail have updated their article:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ce-UFO-retrieval-missions-whistleblowers.html
Another source with knowledge of the OGA's role said that they specialize in allowing the US military to secretly access areas around the world where they would usually be 'denied' – for example behind enemy lines.

'They are basically a facilitator for people to get in and out of countries,' the source said. 'They are very clever at being able to get anywhere in the world they want to.'

Multiple sources briefed on the OGA's activities told DailyMail.com that most of its operations involve more conventional retrieval missions, such as stray nuclear weapons, downed satellites or adversaries' technology.

But they claimed some missions coordinated by the OGA have involved retrieval of UFOs.

'The task at hand is simply to get it into custody and protect the secrecy of it,' one source said. 'The actual physical retrieval is by the military. But it's not kept under military control, because they have to keep too many records. So they start moving it out fairly quickly into private hands.'

Documents published by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in December 2016 showed that the OGA was one of 56 offices in the CIA, with its chief and deputy making up two of a total 286 director-level officials in the spy agency.

An unclassified organizational chart published by the CIA in October 2015 lists the OGA among nine offices in the 'Science and Technology' wing of the agency.

Late CIA expert Jeffrey Richelson wrote in a 2016 book on the agency that the OGA was established in 2003, and cited a CIA description that it 'integrate[s] analysis, technology, and tradecraft to attack the most difficult targets, and to provide worldwide collection capability.'
Content from External Source
A 255-word biography of former OGA deputy director Doug Wolfe, published by an aerospace conference in 2017, says that he 'helped start the Office of Global Access'.

Wolfe's bio cryptically adds that he 'was responsible for leading and managing strategic, unwarned access programs that deliver intelligence from the most challenging denied areas' and 'served as program manager with responsibility for the end-to-end system acquisition of an innovative new source and method for the IC [Intelligence Community].'

Two sources told DailyMail.com that the OGA coordinates with Special Operations Forces such as SEAL teams or Delta Force under the Pentagon's Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), or nuclear weapons experts such as the Nuclear Emergency Support Team (NEST), to collect the crashed or landed craft.

But another source, who has briefed members of Congress on alleged crash retrievals, said that NEST had not been involved in any of these operations.

A spokesperson for the agency also denied involvement.

'[NEST] personnel encounter materials from unknown origins on a regular basis,' a spokesperson said. 'In fact, one of NEST's missions is to help determine the origin of nuclear material interdicted outside of regulatory control or used in a nuclear device.

'During its operations, NEST has never encountered any material related to UAP.'

In a written statement, a JSOC spokesperson told DailyMail.com: 'We have nothing for you on this.'
Content from External Source
78283845-12796167-image-a-14_1701101080184.png78283829-12796167-image-a-17_1701101094519.png78283849-12796167-image-a-18_1701101099126.png
Content from External Source
I couldn't see where they sourced these documents.
 
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Found an org chart in the National Security Archive of the George Washington University.

https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB438/
Washington, D.C., August 5, 2013 – Today, on the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the CIA's Directorate of Science and Technology, the National Security Archive posts an update to its 2001 electronic briefing book on Science, Technology and the CIA. The posting adds 20 new items to the 45 documents in the previous version. The new records cover all eras of the CIA's exploitation of science and technology, from its initial involvement during the tenure of Allen Dulles (1953-61) to its post-Cold War activities.
Content from External Source
Document 63: Organization Chart, Central Intelligence Agency, 2011. Unclassified.

Source: www.cia.gov.

While the most recent CIA organizational chart on the CIA website does not reflect the disestablishment of the Office of Development and Engineering (Document 64), it does reflect the creation of a number of new directorate offices established post-September 11, 2011 — including the offices of Global Access, Special Activities, Special Communications Programs, Systems Engineering and Analysis, and Technical Readiness.
Content from External Source
 

Attachments

  • doc_63.pdf
    408 KB · Views: 30
The meaning of "Global Access" in the context of the NSA:
Article:
Operations by the National Security Agency can be divided into three types:
  • Collection overseas, which falls under the responsibility of the Global Access Operations (GAO) division.
  • Domestic collection, which falls under the responsibility of the Special Source Operations (SSO) division.
  • Hacking operations, which fall under the responsibility of the Tailored Access Operations (TAO) division.
 
So people who have hearsay information about a CIA program go talk to a UK tabloid?
Yeah, right...

The Messenger headline reflects my thoughts:
Article:

The CIA Has Secretly Retrieved UFOs, Say Anonymous Sources With Zero Evidence



The OGA seems to actually exist:
Article:
2003

création de :

Office of Global Access : soutien à la collecte et aux opérations techniques

auto-translated: "Office of Global Access: collection and technical operations support". This is not a new addition to that page.

It's kinda hard to find out what OGA does, even when I add -UFO to my Google search terms.
OGA acts as a full spectrum enabler to technological collection operations in hard target nations and austere environments. Or in simple terms if you're having trouble breaching Russian defense networks or obtaining access to certain locations, they can assist. They do run some technical collection operations on their own rather than enabling, though it gets much more into emerging methods and processes. Not entirely the same as NSAs.
adding that author to my search improved the quality of the results

First, to get it out of the way:
https://www.dni.gov/files/NCSC/documents/ci/CI_Glossary.pdf
SmartSelect_20231129-135656_Samsung Notes.jpg
SmartSelect_20231129-135633_Samsung Notes.jpg

But the OGA does exist, and seems to have redacted parts of this document:
https://www.nsa.gov/portals/75/docu...ed-documents/cryptologic-histories/EC-121.pdf
SmartSelect_20231129-135031_Samsung Notes.jpg
Example of a redaction (there are many more):
SmartSelect_20231129-135201_Samsung Notes.jpg
I lack the knowledge to conclude from these redactions what the OGA might be interested in.

The Daily Mail have updated their article:
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/ar...ce-UFO-retrieval-missions-whistleblowers.html
Another source with knowledge of the OGA's role said that they specialize in allowing the US military to secretly access areas around the world where they would usually be 'denied' – for example behind enemy lines.

'They are basically a facilitator for people to get in and out of countries,' the source said. 'They are very clever at being able to get anywhere in the world they want to.'

Multiple sources briefed on the OGA's activities told DailyMail.com that most of its operations involve more conventional retrieval missions, such as stray nuclear weapons, downed satellites or adversaries' technology.

But they claimed some missions coordinated by the OGA have involved retrieval of UFOs.

'The task at hand is simply to get it into custody and protect the secrecy of it,' one source said. 'The actual physical retrieval is by the military. But it's not kept under military control, because they have to keep too many records. So they start moving it out fairly quickly into private hands.'

Documents published by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in December 2016 showed that the OGA was one of 56 offices in the CIA, with its chief and deputy making up two of a total 286 director-level officials in the spy agency.

An unclassified organizational chart published by the CIA in October 2015 lists the OGA among nine offices in the 'Science and Technology' wing of the agency.

Late CIA expert Jeffrey Richelson wrote in a 2016 book on the agency that the OGA was established in 2003, and cited a CIA description that it 'integrate[s] analysis, technology, and tradecraft to attack the most difficult targets, and to provide worldwide collection capability.'
Content from External Source
A 255-word biography of former OGA deputy director Doug Wolfe, published by an aerospace conference in 2017, says that he 'helped start the Office of Global Access'.

Wolfe's bio cryptically adds that he 'was responsible for leading and managing strategic, unwarned access programs that deliver intelligence from the most challenging denied areas' and 'served as program manager with responsibility for the end-to-end system acquisition of an innovative new source and method for the IC [Intelligence Community].'

Two sources told DailyMail.com that the OGA coordinates with Special Operations Forces such as SEAL teams or Delta Force under the Pentagon's Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC), or nuclear weapons experts such as the Nuclear Emergency Support Team (NEST), to collect the crashed or landed craft.

But another source, who has briefed members of Congress on alleged crash retrievals, said that NEST had not been involved in any of these operations.

A spokesperson for the agency also denied involvement.

'[NEST] personnel encounter materials from unknown origins on a regular basis,' a spokesperson said. 'In fact, one of NEST's missions is to help determine the origin of nuclear material interdicted outside of regulatory control or used in a nuclear device.

'During its operations, NEST has never encountered any material related to UAP.'

In a written statement, a JSOC spokesperson told DailyMail.com: 'We have nothing for you on this.'
Content from External Source
78283845-12796167-image-a-14_1701101080184.png78283829-12796167-image-a-17_1701101094519.png78283849-12796167-image-a-18_1701101099126.png
Content from External Source
I couldn't see where they sourced these documents.
OGA in the document you put above here is dual reference to another term you quoted, "Other Government Agency", it's not the same as the Office of Global Access. OGA is a term largely used within the military to reference certain non-military functions, primarily the CIA.
 
OGA acts as a full spectrum enabler to technological collection operations in hard target nations and austere environments. Or in simple terms if you're having trouble breaching Russian defense networks or obtaining access to certain locations, they can assist. They do run some technical collection operations on their own rather than enabling, though it gets much more into emerging methods and processes. Not entirely the same as NSAs.
So if the USG wanted to retrieve weird mummies from Venezuela, the OGA might be involved?
 
So if the USG wanted to retrieve weird mummies from Venezuela, the OGA might be involved?
I doubt it, the CIA has had a continuity of offices for decades which actually specifically specialized in covert acquisition of materials, equipment, personnel, etc. These are most literally what the claims represent. It use to go by Armor & Special Programs Branch out of SAC but we don't know if its been escalated to a Department like the other branches in SAC after the agency wide 2016 reform. SAC has a lot of their own internal resources to enable certain capabilities that would forego the need for others, like covert and clandestine movement and transportation through austere environments. Check out Project Azorian and the Glomar Explorer for example, that operation was co-led by a predecessor to that branch and the predecessor to the (at the time) Maritime Branch (now Department).
 
I doubt it, the CIA has had a continuity of offices for decades which actually specifically specialized in covert acquisition of materials, equipment, personnel, etc. These are most literally what the claims represent. It use to go by Armor & Special Programs Branch out of SAC but we don't know if its been escalated to a Department like the other branches in SAC after the agency wide 2016 reform. SAC has a lot of their own internal resources to enable certain capabilities that would forego the need for others, like covert and clandestine movement and transportation through austere environments. Check out Project Azorian and the Glomar Explorer for example, that operation was co-led by a predecessor to that branch and the predecessor to the (at the time) Maritime Branch (now Department).
so technical/technological collection would be more like wiretaps, accessing data, etc.?
 
so technical/technological collection would be more like wiretaps, accessing data, etc.?
Things broadly of that nature, yes. The difference between technical collection and physical collection references the means, ie, technical collection would be information collecting through technological means, while physical would pretty much be a human themselves doing it. Sometimes they can intertwine like in Close Access Operations where you may need someone to physically put a program on a computer or whatever it may be. They would take root elements of this that other groups actually carry out, and offer enabling capabilities to it. For example, lets say you breached into a computer system for a foreign nation, the guys at Global Affairs could variously; have offered specific technical capabilities that allowed the breach to be conducted, or alternatively follow-on enabling for persistent collection, like applying ML/AI algorithms to do mass data pulls over manually searching and targeting specific information.
 
The difference between technical collection and physical collection references the means, ie, technical collection would be information collecting through technological means, while physical would pretty much be a human themselves doing it.
It's kinda hard to imagine, then, how OGA would have "played a central role since 2003 in orchestrating the collection of what could be alien spacecraft." It seems to not match their mission at all.
 
Retrieval of unidentified aircraft, missiles, satellite debris or any related parts is normally done by the USAF.

'A big part of NASIC’s work involves studying captured planes, missiles, satellites and related equipment to better understand the capabilities of U.S. adversaries. This started with a captured German Fokker D.VII biplane in World War I and continues today, in secrecy."

https://www.daytondailynews.com/new...t-important-watchdogs/PK4CS4uOSri9vrBXMrfG0H/

The CIA/OGA would normally only get involved if the material was located in country that refused to grant the US or an ally access. Pretty sure this is the latest incarnation of the same office that smuggled the first T-72 tank and other Soviet tech out of Afghanistan back in the `80s.
 
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