Searchlight "UAP" in Wisconsin - Flanders Family Christmas Lights

deirdre

Senior Member.
(I apologize for the screen grab, but the weather channel doesn't let me cut and paste.)
025A9C34-5708-4DB3-97CA-9CC625F57F1F.jpeg
(Brian Brettschneider, weather.com, "November kicks off the cloudiest time of year...")
that only answers the question if one knows what "because the jetstream" means.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
I was going for something along the lines of 'because cold air holds less moisture than warm air, so clouds are more likely to form blah blah blah'
 

Ann K

Senior Member.
I'l take that to mean you don't know.
(**sigh**) The polar jet stream is a current of circumpolar air, so it's cold. When the jet stream loops down into the lower 48, it brings a lot of cold air down to us. When the air is colder, moisture in the air more readily condenses into clouds. Will that do as a simple explanation?

(Side note: one of the things that has caused significant amounts of weird weather in the USA is the fact that the jet stream is swinging in wide oscillations at times, not following its usual pattern of behavior. That give us times that, for example, the temperature in Fairbanks is higher than the temperature in Orlando, as happened a couple of years ago at Christmas. The temperature where I am in Ohio dropped 35°F overnight, and I suspect the jet stream is responsible.)
 
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JMartJr

Senior Member
Except it gets darker later on July 4th (fewer eyes on the sky),
My sense is that there are aome number of people watching stuff in the sky on the 4th of July! ^_^ Of course, it may be that they are more likely to interpret interesting lights as part of a show on the night of a million "C" Class fireworks...

and there's less likely to be low cloud cover.
I'll concede that point -- but still, low clouds are not impossible on the 4th, or on Opening Night of the community theater, or Big Sale night at the car lot.
 

FatPhil

Senior Member.
In the MUFON submission they included a map and drawings.
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This needs to be read in the context that "they followed us" is also a behaviour seen from venus (or was it jupiter?) in eye-witness testimony - from experts!
Maybe your kid was shaken by the experience because he was in a car with a hysterical person behind the wheel?
 

Rocky

Active Member
What amazes me are the gullible UFO people go straight to aliens even after the Shenzhen Meteorological Bureau explained what it was.
 

FatPhil

Senior Member.
and if you cant see the bottom of the spotlight beam...

Absolutely - well spotted, thank you! This highlights the exponential attenuation of the beam brilliantly. The "losing 0.1% of its energy per 10m slice of air"-type thing I mentioned above. There's more energy to be dissipated and diffused near the source, and less as you go along the beam.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
Bright orbs that seemed to glide through the clouds over rural parts of the state were recently captured in video footage shared by social media users who thought they might have seen a UFO.

"Multiple witnesses reporting orb-like UAPs flying in formation over rural Wisconsin..!!" wrote Twitter user Joshua Rodriguez. A tweet of the video on his page garnered over 24,000 views.

But according to investigator and columnist Mick West, the illuminated objects likely came from spotlights at a home in Belgium, a village in Ozaukee County.

"Regarding the Wisconsin searchlight 'UAP' [unidentified aerial phenomena], I asked around and apparently the Holy Cross Church of Belgium, WI, added searchlights to their Christmas display this year. And it's right in the lines of sight," West wrote.
https://people.com/human-interest/ufo-sighting-wisconsin-apparently-solved-christmas-lights/

Article concludes with Ben Hansen's $0.02, to preserve some sense of mystery -- this is, after all, People...
 
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deirdre

Senior Member.
Absolutely - well spotted, thank you! This highlights the exponential attenuation of the beam brilliantly. The "losing 0.1% of its energy per 10m slice of air"-type thing I mentioned above. There's more energy to be dissipated and diffused near the source, and less as you go along the beam.
i was looking up projectors as a house on the way to a family member had a projector that shined on their house and you could only see the beam if you went down a side street. Here the Aitken "Lighthouse" design is a good example...from most angles you see no beam
lighthouse2.png
lighthouse1.png
 
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