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Noise record of MH370's crash?

MikeC

Closed Account
So Australian researchers at Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology have combed anomalous noise events from 8 March and found this -


AN extremely low frequency signal which travelled thousands of kilometres through the Indian Ocean to underwater detection stations off Western Australia’s coast could have been the sound of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 hitting the water.
Scientists warn it is more likely to be the sound of a small earthquake but could nevertheless be used to refine the search area.
The brief signal was detected by a sound recorder sitting on the ocean floor west of Rottnest Island, next to Perth, just after 9.30am WST on March 8.
That was later matched with a signal picked up by a separate underwater listening station operated by the United Nation’s Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organisation, 140km off Cape Leeuwin.
Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology has been analysing the data since early April.
The centre’s senior research fellow Alec Duncan told a press conference today the bearing for the signal was in the same north-westerly direction as the search area identified by the Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC).
However, the range was about 1000km further away than the search arc plotted by satellite “handshake” data in the southern Indian Ocean.
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As they say it appears to be typical of earthquakes, but the curmudgeon in me notes that ELF's are something evil that HAARP generates, and so it is probably the fault of the NWO .....
 

Jason

Senior Member
So Australian researchers at Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology have combed anomalous noise events from 8 March and found this -


AN extremely low frequency signal which travelled thousands of kilometres through the Indian Ocean to underwater detection stations off Western Australia’s coast could have been the sound of Malaysian Airlines flight MH370 hitting the water.
Scientists warn it is more likely to be the sound of a small earthquake but could nevertheless be used to refine the search area.
The brief signal was detected by a sound recorder sitting on the ocean floor west of Rottnest Island, next to Perth, just after 9.30am WST on March 8.
That was later matched with a signal picked up by a separate underwater listening station operated by the United Nation’s Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organisation, 140km off Cape Leeuwin.
Curtin University’s Centre for Marine Science and Technology has been analysing the data since early April.
The centre’s senior research fellow Alec Duncan told a press conference today the bearing for the signal was in the same north-westerly direction as the search area identified by the Joint Agency Coordination Centre (JACC).
However, the range was about 1000km further away than the search arc plotted by satellite “handshake” data in the southern Indian Ocean.
Content from External Source
As they say it appears to be typical of earthquakes, but the curmudgeon in me notes that ELF's are something evil that HAARP generates, and so it is probably the fault of the NWO .....
If it was a small earthquake wouldn't they have siesmic recordings of that day, time, and location to help them determine if it was from an earthquake or plane hitting the water.
 
If it was a small earthquake wouldn't they have siesmic recordings of that day, time, and location to help them determine if it was from an earthquake or plane hitting the water.
Both earthquakes and an aircraft hitting the water at high speed would produce low frequency waves. The whole point is that they are analyzing the data to determine which one it was. These signals ARE seismic recordings..
 

Jason

Senior Member
They give a time and location - not sure what your point is??
I would imagine that they could tell the difference between an airplane impacting the water vs an earthquake that starts below the surface.
 
Curtin U's published map defines a long, thin zone stretching from roughly [18.5s, 92e] NW to the coast of Yemen/Oman. This means the sound had to travel between 1,700 and 5,300 miles before reaching the Rottnest detection station.

Speed of sound underwater varies, but if you accept 3,510mph as reasonable, then 1:30am detection time = between 11:59pm (at NW end) and 1:01am (at SE end) event time. Not sure whether the thickness of the region means anything, but it reaches its "fattest" at about 3,150 miles from the sound recorder, which indicates a 12:36am event.

Also relevant: all times above are UTC. Most MH370-related times (e.g. 0:41 take-off, 8:19 postulated time of crash) have been given in Malaysian time = UTC+8h. This means that the event Curtin U has detected took place between 7:59 and 9:01 MYT, or between 7.3 and 8.3 hours into the flight. At the thickest (most likely?) point in the region, the event would have occurred at 8:36 MYT, or 7.9 hours flight time.

If we trust the precision of the 7.5h endurance estimate, the solved-for crash time is 8:11 MYT, which (if the Curtis U event was the crash) gives a solved-for location of around [10N, 60.5E] - the middle of the Arabian Sea.

(The Maldives eyewitness accounts were 6:15 local, or 9:15 MYT, so no corroboration, there.)

All of this requires the Inmarsat data to have been way off - unless something is revealed about THAT, I doubt this new lead will bear fruit.
 

Pete Tar

Senior Member.
Didn't china report a seismic event too? That one's been dismissed as not relevant.

A team of seismologists at one of China’s top universities said they had detected a slight seismic event on the sea floor between Vietnam and Malaysia on March 8, which might be consistent with an airplane crashing into the sea, and possibly related to the missing Malaysian Airlines flight MH370.

The Chinese scientists, with the university’s Laboratory of Seismology and Physics of the Earth’s Interior, said in their online statement that the signal they had picked up from two seismic monitor stations in Malaysia seemed to indicate that a slight tremor occurred on the sea floor at about 2.55am on March 8, some 150 kilometres off the southern tip of Vietnam.
...
This is questionable. First, the act of hitting an breaking up in the water would slow the impact with the ocean floor considerably. Even a direct hit would likely not register this high on a seismograph. Also, the US Geological Survey who records quakes in cooperation with other agencies around the world, located a magnitude-2.7 earthquake off the west coast of Sumatra at the same time. That location (shown in the other blue circle in the graphic above), however, is a very active seismic zone with daily quakes. Other experts notes that this event is not related to a plane crash. It looks like a triagulation problem.
http://doubtfulnews.com/2014/03/seismic-event-on-the-ocean-floor-connected-to-mh370/
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Maybe this is being given more credence because it was near the supposed final flight zone.
 

David Coulter

Senior Member.
I question whether the seismic event from a surface impact would travel very far. A seafloor earthquake transmits all of the energy into rock and the water body. A crash would put most of the energy into a surface wave.

A similar argument has been made over tsunami risk in Florida due to the collapse of part of La Palma. A good Florida tsunami debunking site can the found here: http://www.lapalma-tsunami.com/tsunami.html.

The tidal wave will not be over 20 metres tall when it reaches Florida.
Why not? Because a landslide on La Palma would be a 'single point event' like dropping a pebble in a pool. The ripples from the pool spread out and diminish very rapidly in height and strength. In the most extreme situation a La Palma landslide would probably not be noticeably more than 100km away.
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I question whether the seismic event from a surface impact would travel very far. A seafloor earthquake transmits all of the energy into rock and the water body. A crash would put most of the energy into a surface wave.

Yeah, airplane hitting the sea is not going to be measurable as a seismic event. Especially not a 2.7 ML. The collapse of WTC1 was measured as 2.3 ML. The impact of the plane into the tower was measured as ML 0.9. Flight 93, which crashed into the ground, was described as "less distinct" than the WTC impacts - I can't find a magnitude though.
http://911research.wtc7.net/mirrors/guardian/WTC/Seismic/WTC_LDEO_KIM.htm

Water creates a huge drag coefficient. A plane is largely empty air, and the volume of water displaced weighs a lot more than the plane does (which is why planes float). The plane would break up instantly into a large number of irregular pieces.

However, the sea in that location is pretty shallow: 100-200 feet. So there would still be some direct impact with the sea floor. It's just vastly cushioned, compared to flying into bedrock.
 

MikeC

Closed Account
Yeah, airplane hitting the sea is not going to be measurable as a seismic event. Especially not a 2.7 ML.

On the news last night they commented that these hydrophones are part of the nuclear test ban monitoring system and are very sensitive & their records are only available once the instruments are retrieved from the sea floor - the visual of the trace of the "event" was only bout twice the amplitude of the background. There was a suggestion they might retrieve some from another site to aid triangulation.
 
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