COVID-19 Coronavirus current events

Mendel

Active Member
They must be using the very test you posted about, non?
If they're doing research, they are not limited to FDA-approved tests. I would expect different test procedures, performed in a suitable laboratory, to be more sensitive, and for Stanford to use them.
The package insert for the test I talked about said that fingerprick samples are not recommended and have not been examined for performance.
 

Trailspotter

Senior Member
There is a News article published in Nature on April 3.

How sewage could reveal true scale of coronavirus outbreak
 

TEEJ

Senior Member
I think it's ok to do something like that. they didn't say "this is Belleview Hospital" or anything.

I'm not sure you are even allowed to film patients in the United States. (or to bring a camera crew into covid-19 infected areas!), so I personally didn't think it was a NY hospital. Plus.. I did previously see the 'bubbles-over-their-heads' when they ran out of ventilators with Italian footage, so I took/take that shot as "this is the future of NY because Orange Man bad", which is kinda the context of what they are talking about.

But that's me.
I noticed that some media were claiming that it was Sky News footage, but in fact it was footage from CBS This Morning. CBS reporters were one of several news agencies allowed access to the Italian hospital. I agree with you they were simply using footage to highlight the bit about ventilators.

See from 1:47

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8Mdk1jPZYQ
 

deirdre

Senior Member
The EU is not a government, that is not a good analogy.
I was going more for a 'size' analogy. (although eu is like 500mill vs usa at 330mill)

Germany is a federal republic
ah. I did not know that.

New York has 100000 active cases, Connecticut has 5000
my point is more that any state can become NY. (say within the next month). it's not like once you send all the reserve ventilators to NYC that NYC will be giving any of them up anytime soon to NJ or Louisiana etc.
 

TEEJ

Senior Member
Here in the UK some people are burning down 5G towers and equipment. Some of the die hard conspiracy theorists who believe that 5G and Coronavirus are linked have been visited by the police after making posts on Facebook. Several of their Facebook and other social media posts have been removed after they were reported.

The following video was filmed by one Facebook poster as he was being advised by police.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxDK9ZA9POg


The guy is still out harassing telecommunications workers.

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Od6YgXaMCMI


From his You Tube Channel

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzohrSx6PXeDt-3SAyYEgnQ/videos

The following from Huffington Post UK

Conspiracy theories about 5G technology and coronavirus have been strongly condemned by the government after two phone masts were apparently set on fire at the end of this week.

At a press conference on Saturday, Cabinet Secretary Michael Gove labelled theories spreading on the internet as “dangerous nonsense”, whilst Stephen Powis, the medical director for NHS England called it “the worst kind of fake news”.

Video footage of a mast on fire in Sparkhill, Birmingham on Thursday evening was widely shared on Twitter, while the Liverpool Echo reported in the early hours of Saturday morning that a mast was also ablaze in Melling, Merseyside – hours after the city’s mayor Joe Anderson criticised the theories as “bizarre”.
From Huffington Post UK link.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/coronavirus-5g-conspiracy-theories-condemned-160943070.html

Source: https://twitter.com/imjustbrum/status/1245833218634506240
 

Rory

Senior Member
I noticed that some media were claiming that it was Sky News footage, but in fact it was footage from CBS This Morning.
That news report was from Saturday 28th March, while the Sky News report was from March 19th, nine days earlier.

Also, the footage from Sky was from Bergamo, whereas the CBS guy was in Parma, 70 miles away.

Seems to me CBS intercut footage that was in the Sky report with actual footage of their reporter.
 
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Arugula

Member
Novartis, a major producer of Hydroxychloroquine (and one of the biggest drug companies in the world) appears to have paid Donald Trump's former personal attorney Michael Cohen more than $1 million for access to the president in 2016:

Source: https://lawandcrime.com/covid-19-pa...ccess-to-trump/amp/?__twitter_impression=true

Going back to Cohen's trial, Cohen claims that they sent a contract to him specifically to lobby the President, but that Cohen crossed out that paragraph of his contract.

Source: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-...-wanted-him-to-lobby-he-refused-idUSKCN1QG2DU

Novartis, and their subsidiary Sandoz, is a leading generics producer, and has committed to donating 130 million doses to support the COVID-19 pandemic response through May. It is a good case of corporate philanthropy, but keep in mind they have not committed to anything after May, when we could continue to see localized cases all over over the world for another year or so before a vaccine is ready and mass produced. So, they could stand to profit from Hydroxychloroquine being a popularized treatment in the long-term.

https://www.novartis.com/news/media...ine-support-global-covid-19-pandemic-response

The question is, is something fishy happening here? Lobbying is extremely common from Big Pharma. Novaris spends on politicians on both sides of the aisle (though not nearly as much as they spent on Cohen). This is their spending through the 2020 campaign: https://www.opensecrets.org/orgs/recipients?id=D000022163

Bankrolling the President's personal lawyer is highly odd and questionable, and its healthy to be skeptical of who is in a policymaker's ears. However, independent of what any politician is saying, we also know a lot of doctors are touting it as a promising treatment - not a miracle cure. As discussed earlier in this thread, Chloroquine and Hydroxychloroquine are still considered 'experimental for treating COVID-19' because no clinical trials have been completed specifically for COVID-19 - so we won't really know the true effectiveness we have more data.
 
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Trailspotter

Senior Member
Just in on the BBC News site:
moderator add: (from article)
 
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Vic Thornley

New Member
Should we be more proactive in this by reporting offending videos, or is it automatic.
In other words, given that there will be a large number of these videos, how do they get 'flagged'
 

TEEJ

Senior Member
Should we be more proactive in this by reporting offending videos, or is it automatic.
In other words, given that there will be a large number of these videos, how do they get 'flagged'
Yes, I would report these offending videos if you stumble upon them. I've just reported a video that was encouraging criminal damage against 5G equipment.
 

Z.W. Wolf

Senior Member
https://www.sciencealert.com/the-us...od-tests-to-hunt-down-immunity-to-coronavirus

This is in addition to the Stanford Study in this post: https://www.metabunk.org/threads/covid-19-coronavirus-current-events.11085/post-237772

Same article mentions that study



 

Mendel

Active Member
The United States has begun taking blood samples from across the country to determine the true number of people infected with the coronavirus, using a test that works retrospectively .
In yesterday's press conference, the director of the RKI revealed in response to a question that Germany is doing a quick survey using 2500 samples from blood donors.

The test procedure they're most likely using is ELISA:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/ELISA

As with the RT-PCR test used to detect SARS-CoV-2 (the novel coronavirus), the machines to run this test are already in common use, and test kits for use with these machines have been available since February or earlier, though the performance of the test needed to be studied and production capacity created for this test to be deployed for common diagnostic use. If you google "elisa test sars-cov-2", you can find several suppliers for research use.

This is not a "quick" test (although it runs faster than rt-PCR), but you can test 92 samples at once. Here is some information from a supplier I picked at random, I expect this to be true in general for this type of test:
http://www.epitopediagnostics.com/covid-19-elisa
The kits are marked "Research use only" and "not reviewed by the FDA".
From their IgG kit IFU:
The fact that this test requires the body to have developed an immune response to the virus makes it less suitable as a diagnostic tool if you want to detect the infection early, but it'd be great for retrospective analysis, though I don't see that it has been validated for that yet. I'd assume the universities using the test for population screening are doing that; they'd have to check that the test is sensitive enough to detect post-infection levels of these antibodies, and develop procedures that increase its sensitivity if it isn't.
 
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Mendel

Active Member
Source: https://mobile.twitter.com/CBSEveningNews/status/1247675561192890368


https://www.propublica.org/article/...d-and-died-of-coronavirus-at-an-alarming-rate


Hoaxes can kill people.
 

DavidB66

Active Member
In the UK there are also reports of disproportionate impact on some ethnic groups. Anecdotally, it has been suggested that elderly South Asians (i.e. mainly people of Indian, Pakistani, and Bangladeshi origins) are more likely to be infected because they often live with younger generations of their family. Some Jewish communities in north London are also said to be severely infected, possibly because gatherings at synagogues were an early focus of infection.
Most of this has been anecdotal, but a new report by the Intensive Care National Audit and Research Centre finds that
about a third of the people analysed who were critically ill with Covid-19 were from black, Asian or minority ethic backgrounds. These communities represent about 13 per cent of the UK population. (Report in The Times, 7 April 20200.)
I found the full report here: https://www.icnarc.org/About/Latest...On-2249-Patients-Critically-Ill-With-Covid-19
The disproportionate impact could be even greater if account is taken of the age distribution, as the representation of these ethnic backgrounds in the older, more at-risk, age groups is probably lower than the stated 13 per cent UK population average. On the other hand, the rate of infection is highest in the London area, which has a higher proportion of ethnic minorities. Another possible factor is that ethnic minorities may be more heavily represented in at-risk occupations such as bus-driving and nursing.
 

Z.W. Wolf

Senior Member
I don't understand this. It seems backwards. I would expect it to be antibodies from the (blood) sample. And antigens applied during the test.

What am I getting wrong?
 

Mendel

Active Member
I don't understand this. It seems backwards. I would expect it to be antibodies from the (blood) sample. And antigens applied during the test.

What am I getting wrong?
You're getting wrong that this is not the "most simple form", but rather a kind of sandwich ELISA, as explained further down the wikipedia page.

Let's look at the diagram for this test again:
image.png
For the IgG test on the left, the microwell Surface is coated with artificial COVID-19 protein S. The sample containing the antibodies Y is added. They bind to S, and in the next step, the tracer antibody Y* binds to Y. The substrate and stop solution then makes Y* visible.

Their IgM test works similarly, but kind of in reverse, but the principle is the same: the sample binds to a protein already in the wall, and a tracer attaches to it. You need the wall attachment so that you can wash the tracer away if the sample is negative, and don't wash it away if it's positive.

Bascially, it's a clever way to glue antibodies in place and make them visible.
If I understand the above diagrams correctly, the IgG test "glues" only Covid-19 antibodies, and the IgM test glues any antibody but only makes Covid-19 antibodies visible. (Keep in mind that this is for this specific manufacturer.)
 
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deirdre

Senior Member
Hoaxes can kill people.
while I agree with this sentiment, you need to remember that those numbers only represent people who have symptoms severe enough to be tested and as your article points out in the paragraph following your quote, the black community has higher rates of health issues which would leave them vulnerable. The Westchester (NY) and Westport(Connecticut) areas are primarily non-black but they were wiped out (infected) by the virus too.

I'm not saying we don't have issues with health in the black communities but I don't think you can point to those numbers and conclude it's all because of internet hoaxes or civil rights rebellion issues.
 

Mendel

Active Member
while I agree with this sentiment, you need to remember that those numbers only represent people who have symptoms severe enough to be tested and as your article points out in the paragraph following your quote, the black community has higher rates of health issues which would leave them vulnerable. The Westchester (NY) and Westport(Connecticut) areas are primarily non-black but they were wiped out (infected) by the virus too.

I'm not saying we don't have issues with health in the black communities but I don't think you can point to those numbers and conclude it's all because of internet hoaxes or civil rights rebellion issues.
I did not say or imply "it's all because", hoaxes are listed in that quote as a contributory cause because they may have led people to behave less cautiously than they otherwise would have, and thus raised the number of infections.
Obviously, "it's just like a flu" achieves the same end without regard to race.

Data from a predominatly single-race area is irrelevant here, as it does not allow a comparison. In a mixed-race town or state, one race acts as a "control group" for the other, allowing a conclusion to be drawn.
 

scombrid

Senior Member
There is a News article published in Nature on April 3.

How sewage could reveal true scale of coronavirus outbreak
I'm filing that under "why didn't I think of that?". We are using environmental DNA these days to detect the presence of a minnow in a river system. Of course a similar tool should work to find out where and maybe even what is the average "load" of a virus in a community.
 

deirdre

Senior Member
Obviously, "it's just like a flu" achieves the same end without regard to race.
Exactly. and the "international travel risk" which was pushed in the beginning.
I do emotionally find that article offensive. the wording. it makes it sound like black people are more stupid or "sensitive".. which certainly they are not any more stupid or "sensitive" than any other ethnic group who also
too many in the community shrugged off warnings
 

Agent K

Active Member
Hoaxes can kill people.
No kidding.
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/e...-ship-part-of-government-takeover/ar-BB122Sbm
"Anthony Fauci’s security is stepped up as doctor and face of U.S. coronavirus response receives threats"
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/a...navirus-response-receives-threats/ar-BB122LOX
Reminds me of attacks on Ebola responders in eastern Congo
 
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Mendel

Active Member
There are currently 51 clinical trials concerning Covid-19 registered in the EU, the database is at https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/search?query=covid-19
Most of these are trials of existing drugs, and many of those are about Chloroquin.

Some of the drug trials target suppressing the immune reaction (cytokine release), which is a common cause of Covid-19 patients suddenly dying. If this is successful, I expect a big impact on the death rate quickly.

One trial is examining the efficacy of plasma treatment:
https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2020-001310-38/DE
The study is a cooperation between the German Red Cross blood donation service, a transfusion clinic, and the ministry of health.

I also found a Dutch trial that tries to protect healthcare workers by vaccinating them against something else (tuberculosis). The idea is that it might prevent the infection, or that it might make the symptoms less severe than they would otherwise be, because the vaccination puts the immune system of the recipients "on alert". This general effect has been studied before, but obviously not with regard to Covid-19.
https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2020-000919-69/NL
I think that's really imaginative and hope it works out!

P.S.: A database for the US is at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/home
It currently lists 440 studies related to Covid-19, from countries all over the world.
 
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Mendel

Active Member
On April 9th, the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for a blood cleaning (aspheresis) machine that removes cytokines from blood plasma. The machine itself already existed for other blood cleaning purposes, but the manufacturer has now FDA approval to treat Covid-19 with it.
https://www.fda.gov/media/136834/download
For hospitals that already have the machine, this could be very useful if it helps. The device contains a centrifuge (9 is the access door for that), and the operating manual is almost 300 pages long.
image.jpeg
https://www.fda.gov/media/136838/download
https://www.fda.gov/media/136839/download
 
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Ravi

Member
On April 9th, the FDA issued an Emergency Use Authorization for a blood cleaning (aspheresis) machine that removes cytokines from blood plasma. The machine itself already existed for other blood cleaning purposes, but the manufacturer has now FDA approval to treat Covid-19 with it.
[ cut ]
I am not a doctor, but I know about cytokines. It is an extremely complex matter and there are pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines.. I am sure it is not just a matter of "removing them and all is good".
 

Mendel

Active Member
I am not a doctor, but I know about cytokines. It is an extremely complex matter and there are pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines.. I am sure it is not just a matter of "removing them and all is good".
The point is to be able to treat the "cytokine storm", i.e. a runaway inflammatory reaction that cases patients' vitals to "crash" and then them to die.
I have absolutely no experience with treating Covid-19 and I'm not a doctor, but I understand that when an ECMO is attached for severe cases, the "tubing" for the aspheresis is already in place, and the risk is there. The description I quoted suggests that this cartridge has been successfully used to treat septic shock and SIRS, so I'd expect that this cartridge can be used to suppress the cytokine storm when it starts. This wouldn't be something you do prophylaxtically: there are drug trials for IL-6 blockers and similar things, which act a lot more specifically than what this cartridge does, and may be able to stop the cytokine storm from occurring in the first place. But if the patient is actively dying, removing the chemicals that actively kill the patient seems like a good idea.

It could be that similar machines are already used in hospitals to treat sepsis, and with that indication used to treat Covid19, and that this specific machine/cartridge just didn't have FDA approval yet?
 

Mendel

Active Member
I'm not really sure if I should continue sharing these EUA reports, or how detailed they should be.
Anyhow, the CDC Emeregncy Use Authorizations are published at https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices...-medical-devices/emergency-use-authorizations , and the IFU documents (Instructions For Use, or package inserts) are usually the best way to find out about an item.

Face Shields
I have seen news reports of grassroots efforts to make clear plastic face shields, and as of April 9th, they're allowed to be used if they're nonflammable and properly labeled.
The FDA extended the authorization for FFP respirators to include more types coming from China.

They had an EUA for a NY company to sterilize N95 masks with hydrogen peroxide for reuse 2 weeks ago; now they've added an EUA to do that using hospital sterilization equipment that would normally be used to sterilize tools that can't suffer high temperatures. The masks are put in gas-permeable bags and then sterilized using a non-lumen cycle. The masks are marked with the user's name and a count of sterilizations (10 max).
image.jpegimage.jpeg

There's a new lab test that works similar to the rt-PCR that's the standard now, but it doesn't need the thermal cycling that rt-PCR does, and it skips the step where the potential virus RNA is isolated from the sample first. Because of the latter, they ran a bunch of tests with samples contaminated with other things people might have in their nose (blood, nasal spray, antiviral medication) to ensure these don't affect the result. However, the test is less sensitive than rt-PCR and requires the samples to be processed within 12 hours, or frozen.
There is now another blood-cleaning system to remove cytokines; it's very simple, basically just a filter that you hook up to a blood pump and that removes hydrophobic particles of a certain size from the blood, as I understand it. You have to watch that it doesn't remove certain medications (e.g. chloroquine) from the blood stream, and it doesn't like intravenous feeding of the patients as the fat could clog it up.
image.jpeg
There's nothing really revolutionary this time, but steady progress is good!
 

Rory

Senior Member
Throughout the spread of the pandemic, there's been one chart that I've found the most interesting and which has informed my opinion of the direction and timing of the virus more than any other. This is the current version:

1586890633079.png
Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-51235105

Since I started looking at it maybe a month ago, it's suggested very strongly that the future (unforeseen second waves aside) is bright: that countries, quite literally, come out of the darkest days pretty quickly.

The big question was, would those countries that were lagging behind China in terms of timeframe follow China's trend, or would they do something different and lend further support to the skepticism around China's figures?

So far, it's looking to me like the former.
 

Mendel

Active Member
I had a look at the worldwide data earlier, computing the ratio of new cases in the past 7 days vs. the seven days before. A fair number of countries in the dataset currently have ratios <1, including Iran, Spain, France, and Italy, and the US are at 1.1 and should cross below 1 tomorrow.

Ireland and Japan still have positive rates, Japan seems to continue to be exponential, but at a slower rate than most other countries with exponential growth.

But there is still a group of countries whose daily case numbers more than double each week. Bangladesh is currently exploding, doubling every two days; the case number still looks low, but if they're not already mitigating, this is going to be bad.
Other countries still spreading strongly include Russia, Belarus, Ukraine; Saudi Arabia, Oman, Bahrein; and Singapore(!).

I really hope that Bangladesh isn't going to be the next big epicenter of the pandemic; the country has a population of 161 million people with an area not much bigger than New York state.

https://www.who.int/docs/default-so...uation-reports/who-ban-covid-19-sitrep-07.pdf
Finding a lot of cases once testing ramps up sounds very familiar, but it does seem like they didn't wait for those tests to start mitigation.
https://bd.usembassy.gov/covid-19-information/
 

Mendel

Active Member
On April 13th, the German science academy Leopoldina has released a third statement with recommendations for a political strategy after the shutdown, signed by academics from multiple disciplines (medicine, law, economics, education, engineering, ...). They have recommendations regarding testing, opening schools, what you would expect, but also an observation that surprised me.
https://www.leopoldina.org/publikat...e-krise-nachhaltig-ueberwinden-13-april-2020/

My translation:
Considering the substantial marks that the the coronavirus crisis is going to leave on our society, but mainly because of the equally threatening climate and biodiversity crisis, we can't simply return to the old state of things before the crisis. The coronavirus pandemic and its root causes have a lesson to teach for our future. Population growth, urbanization and global mobility, the destruction of ecosystems and impairment of their resilience due to changed land use and climate change contribute substantially to the outbreak of epidemics and pandemics.

Public measures to restart the economy after the pandemic has subsided should therefore focus on sustainability. If the investment programs enacted now are oriented towards sustainability, those involved would be at liberty to implement the necessary changes in a way that fits the local circumstances and timeline, to create the necessary open technologies for e.g. the energy transition, close regional and global resource cycles, etc. If we miss this chance, the size of the current economic programs will make the drastic changes very difficult that are going to be required later. Therefore, the actors' responsibility to realize this historic opportunity can hardly be overestimated. A transparent public discussion of all costs is necessary, including the massive public costs of climate change, environmental damage, and the resulting public health issues.
 

Mendel

Active Member
At the press conference with the German health minister this morning, it was revealed that we actually have had enough test capacity to process more tests than the physicians requested, which means our backlog in the system should be mostly gone, and it supports my theory that test volume is driven by the size of the "suspect pool". They're planning to use the surplus capacity to protect retirement homes and hospitals.
A month of increasingly severe social distancing measures brought R0 down to 0.7 on average; some regions still have >1. The goal is to keep it below 1.

The FDA Emergency Use Authorizations now include an ELISA antibody test, similar to the one I presented earlier, and others. The recent EUAs about using hospital sterilizers to decontaminate N95 masks limit the number of reuses to 2 (used to be 10), and I noticed they state that the masks are not sterile after the process (as before, hence the need to tag them with the user name). A new device type (from two different manufacturers) is a "diaphragm pacer" which electrically stimulates the diaphragm so it starts to work again on its own after the patient has been on a ventilator for weeks and forgotten how to breathe. (This is one way Covid-19 is different from the flu: patients stay on respirators for longer.)
image.jpeg
https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices...-medical-devices/emergency-use-authorizations
 

Rory

Senior Member
Throughout the spread of the pandemic, there's been one chart that I've found the most interesting and which has informed my opinion of the direction and timing of the virus more than any other. This is the current version:

View attachment 40335
Source: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-51235105

Since I started looking at it maybe a month ago, it's suggested very strongly that the future (unforeseen second waves aside) is bright: that countries, quite literally, come out of the darkest days pretty quickly.

The big question was, would those countries that were lagging behind China in terms of timeframe follow China's trend, or would they do something different and lend further support to the skepticism around China's figures?

So far, it's looking to me like the former.
All that said about my enthusiasm for this chart, I would perhaps rather the levels were based on percentage of population rather than number of cases: I guess there's a big difference between 5,000+ cases in the US and 5,000+ cases in Belgium.

Johns Hopkins - the source for the data for this chart - does have lots of other charts, including this one:

newplot (1).png
Source: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/cumulative-cases

That shows cumulative number of deaths rather than daily totals, but is by per 100,000 of the population. If you click on the link above, there are interactive features also. Very interesting stuff: shows that Belgium, for example, has 4x the per capita death rate of the US.
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
That shows cumulative number of deaths rather than daily totals, but is by per 100,000 of the population. If you click on the link above, there are interactive features also. Very interesting stuff: shows that Belgium, for example, has 4x the per capita death rate of the US.
The "Incident Rate" tab on the JHU map shows this in finer detail.
https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6
Metabunk 2020-04-18 12-28-59.jpg
Beligium is relatively small (11.5 million) dense (991 people per square mile region. The US has 30 times the people, and 1/10th the population density. So comparing Belgium to the US is not that useful, better to compare it to a more similar US state like those in the North East.
 

Rory

Senior Member
I think what I meant was being able to see the apparent 'curve' of the original chart in terms of per capita rate.

There's a strong sense of 'up and down' in that chart - countries working their way towards 5000+ cases per day and then coming out of it - but because it's number of cases rather than percentage of population, it's harder to gauge exactly what those curves/trends look like.
 
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DavidB66

Active Member
Mick makes a good point about population density. A large proportion (about a third) of the UK cases and deaths are in London and south-east England. The Paris area accounts for nearly half the cases in France. In Spain Madrid and Barcelona, the two largest cities, between them account for more than half. I wonder if the relatively low rate of serious cases in Germany has something to do with the population distribution there. No single city in Germany has the population size of the cities just mentioned. This may help Germany control the spread of infection both within and between different population centres. (The southern and western Lander have had fairly high rates of infection, but it does not seem to have spread in the north and east, and especially Berlin, in the way that might have been expected.)
But against any idea that large population centres are necessarily badly hit, the infection and death rates in Japan, with its huge cities, remain relatively low.
 

Mendel

Active Member
No single city in Germany has the population size of the cities just mentioned.
That depends on who you ask.
The state of Berlin has 135 cases/100000 currently, German average is 165, and the state of Hamburg has 224. Bavaria is worst hit (closest to Italy) with 282, but still below Belgium.

@Rory (or anyone else), if you'd like to see a specific graph, I can probably generate it for you from the ECDC database (or another, ideally csv). Just drop me a PM with what you'd like to see and the countries you'd like to see it for. The 3day-average over the 14-day-sum plot is good.
 
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