Contrails in Airline Advertising

Leifer

Senior Member
I'm not positive about those airborne trails in the graphic....are they not simply an explanation of aircraft maneuverability ?.....and are but simply "motion lines" added by an illustrator, and perhaps not contrails ?
(the Ad speaks of radio communications).

https://books.google.com/books?id=x1YEAAAAMBAJ&lpg=PA12&dq=contrails&pg=PA16#v=onepage&q=contrails&f=false

trail_lines.jpg
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I'm not positive about those airborne trails in the graphic....are they not simply an explanation of aircraft maneuverability ?.....and are but simply "motion lines" added by an illustrator, and perhaps not contrails ?
(the Ad speaks of radio communications).
I agree, but I think there's a degree of inspiration from dogfighting contrails behind it. There are also some horizontal white lines in the background of the right side image that look like contrails.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
20161120-181748-x33fi.jpg

We've seen the bottom one before, I just bought one at a local antique store. But the top three are a new one to me. Looks like some stylized jet with tail mounted engines. Maybe meant to be Concorde?

Also, an airsickness bag:
 

deirdre

Moderator
Staff member

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Very cool, the SST is interesting from a contrail perspective because of this 1971 story
20161122-055518-j19q1.jpg

The concern is the SST will increase the amount of contrails. One guy says he sees contrails cover the sky already, the other guy (a Senator) said he'd never seen contrails form clouds.

Now I need to add the stick to my collection!
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
The concern is the SST will increase the amount of contrails. One guy says he sees contrails cover the sky already, the other guy (a Senator) said he'd never seen contrails form clouds.
Reminds me of this discussion around the time Concorde was in development:



Concorde used to fly directly over my house on a daily basis, but too low for contrails. I don't know whether it used to make trails when it was cruising up at 60,000ft.

We might see some more if the Boom project gets off the ground.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Reminds me of this discussion around the time Concorde was in development:



Concorde used to fly directly over my house on a daily basis, but too low for contrails. I don't know whether it used to make trails when it was cruising up at 60,000ft.

We might see some more if the Boom project gets off the ground.
I think Mason has it right there, Ice Supersaturated regions are rare above the tropopause.
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
Not sure if it's at cruise altitude though.
It looks like Concorde broke the sound barrier well before it reached 60,000 feet:

http://aviation.stackexchange.com/questions/21881/at-what-altitude-did-concorde-go-supersonic

The speed was limited to 400 knots (IAS, indicated air speed, which is not the same as true speed) up to 32,000 feet, but that is already above Mach 1.

 

Graham2001

Active Member
This is not an advert, but the opening illustration of the Readers Digest edition of Donald Gordon's (Pen name for Donald G. Payne, who also used the names James Vance Marshall and Ian Cameron.) 1962 novel 'Star-Raker' about a prototype SST with an 'Achilles Heel', there are two contrails in the sky above the landed aircraft.

Star-Raker, Readers Digest - 1962.jpg
 
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