Claim - 'Orbs Killing Chemtrails'

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
I stumbled on this.
This was filmed right above my house. Look at how low the chemtrail is and how fast it disappears. You can see little orbs flying around the trail and it disappears in no time.

What i filmed was not a "contrail" but definitly a "chemtrail". Trust me.
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Now the so called 'chemtrail' looks like any normal contrail to me slowly fading away, and the 'orbs' are obviously something at a far lower altitude than the trail, but can anyone suggest what the orbs actually are? My first reaction was birds, but I'm not so sure. My father is a keen birder and I've often gone birding with him (for those 'father and son' moments :) ) and the orbs don't move like birds and are a tad too fast in my mind. Don't think they're insects either. So something less animate maybe, snow flakes, raindrops, lens effect from the zoom? It appears the video was shot through glass, as the edge of a window frame / curtain appears top right in a few frames (edit - could also be a roof edge, as pointed out below). There is no indication anywhere as to the time and place the vid was shot, so no clues other than the visual ones. Any ideas, as its bugging the hell out of me.
 
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PandyFackler

New Member
I think that dark edge is a roof line. Cottonwood fluff?

This was my first thought, depends on when/where the video was recorded. The spots all seem to be moving from the left to the right, at roughly the same speeds and they don't change directions. Seems likely it is something blown by the wind.

Don't see any other clouds, and it seems to be a bright day out, so I'm not thinking snow.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
This was my first thought, depends on when/where the video was recorded. The spots all seem to be moving from the left to the right, at roughly the same speeds and they don't change directions. Seems likely it is something blown by the wind.

Don't see any other clouds, and it seems to be a bright day out, so I'm not thinking snow.
agree with the when and where. but it can be bright and still get those fuluffy white snowflakes. happens here like that all the time. happened yesterday as a matter of fact.
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
This was my first thought, depends on when/where the video was recorded. The spots all seem to be moving from the left to the right, at roughly the same speeds and they don't change directions. Seems likely it is something blown by the wind.

Don't see any other clouds, and it seems to be a bright day out, so I'm not thinking snow.
The video was POSTED in June 2013, but as it could have been filmed any time up to that point i wouldn't like to say for definite was shot in spring / summer, and with no visual clues (bare or leafy trees etc) to give clues I wouldn't like to say for certain it is a nice hot sunny day or a cold frost clear one.

You can get snow from cloudless skies
In his post earlier today, CWG photographer Kevin Ambrose displays neat photographs of the sunrise on Feb. 16 (Presidents' Day) that show snow falling from a blue sky above -- the third time this winter Kevin has observed this phenomenon.

We normally think of sun showers as when rain falls while the sun is shining. This occurs mostly in the warm season when, for example, thunder clouds are nearly overhead with sunshine reaching our eyes at an angle through a cloudless region of the sky.

Sun snow showers differ in the sense that snowflakes can land before your very eyes with clear blue skyoverhead, as in the case Kevin describes.

Keep reading to find out how snowflakes or rain droplets can fall from a cloudless sky...
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http://voices.washingtonpost.com/capitalweathergang/2009/02/in_his_recent_post_sunrise.html

And you can get snow in summer, I remember being on holiday in Cumbria in the 70's and having a snow shower in early June. So snow can't be ruled out. http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/snow/snow-in-the-uk
On 2 June 1975 snow showers forced the abandonment of several cricket matches across the country.
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But if it was spring / summer floating seeds is a strong possibility.
 

JFDee

Senior Member.
The sound indicates a fairly strong wind hitting the camera microphone, so the movement of the particles is nothing mysterious.

However, they remind me rather of petals blown away, like at the end of the blooming season in the vicinity of an orchard. I have seen similar "snow" events in my area where a lot of fruit is grown.

The objects don't look very 'fluffy' to me. I think the apparently sharp edges would match small leaves better.
Also, this would approximately match the video upload date (assuming this was recorded in the northern hemisphere).
 

Ray Von Geezer

Senior Member.
Many of the "orbs" in the video look like they're moving in straight lines, but in the edge detection at the end they certainly look to be moving move like snow flakes would (maybe blossom?) and the blurring (particularly the "orb" at 1:02) looks like it's something relatively close to the camera.

Ray Von
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
The sound indicates a fairly strong wind hitting the camera microphone, so the movement of the particles is nothing mysterious.

However, they remind me rather of petals blown away, like at the end of the blooming season in the vicinity of an orchard. I have seen similar "snow" events in my area where a lot of fruit is grown.

The objects don't look very 'fluffy' to me. I think the apparently sharp edges would match small leaves better.
Also, this would approximately match the video upload date (assuming this was recorded in the northern hemisphere).
certainly not arguing, they could be many things. but by 'fluffy' i mean BIG and white.

snow.png
 

JFDee

Senior Member.
Many videos from that YouTube user mention "Belgium" in the title. I think it's safe to assume that he is based there and the video is shot in the moderate part of the northern hemisphere.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
The sound indicates a fairly strong wind hitting the camera microphone, so the movement of the particles is nothing mysterious.

However, they remind me rather of petals blown away, like at the end of the blooming season in the vicinity of an orchard. I have seen similar "snow" events in my area where a lot of fruit is grown.

The objects don't look very 'fluffy' to me. I think the apparently sharp edges would match small leaves better.
Also, this would approximately match the video upload date (assuming this was recorded in the northern hemisphere).

I think they are certainly some kind of windblown thing close to the camera, but you really can't tell if they have "sharp edges", they are basically just point of white light, out of focus.

Some kind of seed seems most likely. Cottonwood, as mentioned, does this. But there are plenty of others too:
 
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JFDee

Senior Member.
you really can't tell if they have "sharp edges"
Yes, the "sharp edge" term was not the best description of what made me dismiss snow flakes.

It's the overall optical and 'aerodynamical' property of the stuff. Snow is less opaque and somehow moves differently when I recall my memory (which has some fresh entries labelled "snow" from last Tuesday, but is certainly fallible as we all know). It's more a feeling really.

Anyway, since there is clearly a steady stream of the particles, and they are apparently moving passively with the wind, I think we can conclude that a highly plausible explanation for the 'orbs' is a botanical event - seeds or petals.
 

Ross Marsden

Senior Member.
Too high in the air for cottonwood fluff. Looks like snow to me.
Snow doesn't fall from a clear sky.
I think the "orbs" are any of a wide range of wind-blown fluffy seeds. So, this was likely videoed in the Fall / Autumn.
I was suspended from a NZ chemtrail forum for posting a video of what I knew was thistle seeds blowing in the wind under the title, "Orbs seen in Wellington". They looked just like those in the OP.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
Snow doesn't fall from a clear sky.
yes it can. either diamond dust or the clouds could be off camera moving in and the wind is blowing it in. pretty sure i took pics last year of it happening here.. will pull out my old laptop tomorrow an dlook.

Although i dont think they are necessarily 'high' in the video, hard to tell they could be tiny fluffs of something closer to the camera. Date and location would help.
 

Ross Marsden

Senior Member.
yes it can. either diamond dust or the clouds could be off camera moving in and the wind is blowing it in. pretty sure i took pics last year of it happening here.. will pull out my old laptop tomorrow an dlook.

Although i dont think they are necessarily 'high' in the video, hard to tell they could be tiny fluffs of something closer to the camera. Date and location would help.
Diamond dust is not snow; it is ice particles that have formed direct from vapor in ice-supersaturated air.
 
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