Blink-182's Tom DeLonge's "To The Stars" UFO Disclosure Enterprise

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
There seems to be a lot of apprehension and discomfort about the topic of this venture on Metabunk. I would counter this by suggesting that not everything UFO-related should be regarded a priori as merely some conventional phenomenon:
Not uncomfortable AT ALL I've been following the whole UFO thing since I was a kid addicted to B-Movies in the early '70s. Used to be a believer myself, watched the skies, read the books, subscribed to UFO magazines (this is well pre-internet), even saw some odd lights in the sky that I still can't explain. I was convinced the truth was out there and THE BIG REVEAL was coming real soon.... anyday now... any.. day.. now... After all, all those magazines kept telling me so.

But as time went by, and ET still hadn't landed in Hyde Park, and those reverse engineered alien anti-g back packs we were promised were not forth coming, yet always just around the corner I started to see sense. I began to realise that there are three main types of UFO proponents. Genuine believers who hang on the vague and almost religious faith that ET is out there and one day, real soon, anyday now... will make himself known and save us from whatever terrible evil that currently looms over society (nuclear war / global warming / over population / pollution / etc / etc / etc): The hoaxers photographing flying hub caps (or these days using basic cgi) to feed the gullibility of the first lot for 'lolz': and the charlatans seeking to make a few bucks out the gullibility of the first lot.

I did real research, not just the UFO propaganda, but started reading into science, astronomy, aviation etc and soon realised that whilst ET is very likely to be out there given the size of the universe, given the size of the universe the chances of them showing up on earth are very very slim. Whats more most UFOs have a far more logical explanation than alien space craft, and even if a sighting cannot be explained, it is still a massive leap of the imagination to go from whats that to ET is buzzing the planet again. These days I find working out exactly what the UFO really is, kids party balloon, aircraft landing lights, Chinese lantern, odd stellar alignment etc is far more interesting than screaming ET at every film of out of focus birds or passing satellite.

I still love a b-movie, and would still be over the moon if REAL evidence of an ETI was provided that stood up to real scrutiny (We are talking HARD PROOF here, a craft landing in a major city, televised live with thousands of independent witnesses for a start). However after having been promised the TRUTH, any day now... real soon... its IS coming honest... for well over 40 years, you will understand I am now a little jaded of such claims and tend to take a 'whatever' approach to the whole issue.
 
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John85

Member
Let's face it - nobody has yet produced evidence that a UFO has landed, that aliens got out of it and made contact with humans, much less taken clear, sharp, uncontroversial photos or videos of such an event, from multiple angles and by multiple witnesses. Nor has anyone proven that 'aliens live among us' - another favorite claim. Let's see those aliens, name them, photograph them, let's hear them speak....until then, it's just fabrication

Used to be a believer myself, watched the skies, read the books, subscribed to UFO magazines (this is well pre-internet), even saw some odd lights in the sky that I still can't explain. I was convinced the truth was out there and THE BIG REVEAL was coming real soon.... anyday now... any.. day.. now... After all, all those magazines kept telling me

However after having been promised the TRUTH, any day now... real soon... its IS coming honest... for well over 40 years, you will understand I am now a little jaded of such claims and tend to take a 'whatever' approach to the whole issue.

'm not apprehensive, I'm simply observing a repetition of events. Nothing will come of it.

Maybe apprehension is not correct, but there does seem to be discomfort and disillusionment. The arguments presented against caring about the TTS announcement seem to start from a place of high expectations about UFO 'disclosure' - expectations that announcements ought to reveal definitive alien encounters or massive government coverups. When the announcement is made and no Disclosure happens, that is taken a a good reason to retreat into the comfort of saying 'Huh, nothing ever happens, just like I knew'. Starting from a more neutral position, we could say no, let's not commit ourselves to the view that UAP are aliens, but consider whether they're worth studying. In that context, is it really 'nothing' that an ex-government official states publicly that he was involved in a study of UFOs, and now wishes to support a private sector venture aimed at exploiting scientific breakthroughs such phenomena may represent? That is in itself an event which many would have scorned before it happened. An appropriate reaction is not, I believe, to assume that this senior defense official has mistaken the phenomenon for a balloon, etc.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
In that context, is it really 'nothing' that an ex-government official states publicly that he was involved in a study of UFOs, and now wishes to support a private sector venture aimed at exploiting scientific breakthroughs such phenomena may represent?

It's not "nothing", it's many things. But it's also not evidence of the imminent delivery of flying cars using over-unity power supplies.

"A study of UFOs"? Okay, what exactly does that mean? What did he do? What were the reports he studied? How many of them were unidentified? How many broke the known laws of physics? What was the evidence?

Here's what he actually said:
http://www.openminds.tv/transcript-of-to-the-stars-academy-press-conference/41145
He gives ZERO details as to what his job entailed. It could have been work on missiles or drones based on that description.

The more interesting bit is:
Well... go on then! Of course he does not actually have this, it's just wishful thinking. Made clear by the next sentence:
So he's really just hopeful that people in the government will release something.

What's his job now?
Here's the meat. The theory they are operating with is that if you study the movement and appearance of these "alien craft" them you will be able to figure out how they work, and then build one yourself. So they got the idea of crowdsourcing the data, maybe using a phone app, and eventually they will have lots of data about UFOs, so the science will just flow out of that data, and bam, over-unity power supply!!

It's like this: imagine you lived in England, in the 1600s. There's some kind of time warp, so you occasionally see a jet powered plane high in the sky, you also see birds, clouds, planets, distant fires, meteors, hallucinations, and suchlike. You collate lots of observations of these things, and twenty years later you have a jet engine.

That's what DeLonge is saying will happen. It's what Elizondo is saying he's going to be doing. It's just wishful thinking.

Tone down my expectations, you say - well these are not MY expectations - they are what DeLonge is promising his investors.

And sure, I'd be really interested if there was a government program, or person, who was actually studying what was thought to be an exotic aerial technology (and not simply advanced Russian/Chinese stuff). So let's see the evidence of this program or person.
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
Maybe apprehension is not correct, but there does seem to be discomfort and disillusionment. .
Again, you seem to be trying to attribute qualities ("discomfort and disillusionment") to folks here
that are absolutely unsupported by anything anyone has typed.

These "To The Stars" people seem to want to make some money.
So they made a big announcement implying dramatic, insider information.
Oddly, instead of offering even a little sample of what they were promising, they offered virtually nothing.

Before, I politely requested that you point to something to support your "apprehension" assertion.
You did not.
So now that you've shifted to "discomfort," can you point to something that supports that?

Many folks here have entertained 100+ claims of amazing UFO revelations.

No one is upset or surprised when #101 is also empty.

Did you see something there, that makes you think they'll actually be revealing real, dramatic UFO info?
 

John85

Member
Before, I politely requested that you point to something to support your "apprehension" assertion.
You did not.
So now that you've shifted to "discomfort," can you point to something that supports that?

I said:

There seems to be a lot of apprehension and discomfort about the topic of this venture on Metabunk

Which is an interpretation I'm sticking to. You may have noticed this thread goes under the category of 'Aliens, Monsters, and the Paranormal'...
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Which is an interpretation I'm sticking to. You may have noticed this thread goes under the category of 'Aliens, Monsters, and the Paranormal'...

The original description was:
https://web.archive.org/web/20110109033332/http://metabunk.org:80/forum.php
Since "Fortean" is a bit of an uncommon word I changed it to:

I wasn't really writing much about UFOs back then, but some topics cropped up, so I added them to the byline. I specified "Alien" UFOs as we were already doing a lot of identifying unknown flying craft leaving contrails. "Monsters" was just a simpler way of writing "cryptozoology"

I've not felt any "apprehension and discomfort" about any of these topics since my early teens, and never about aliens. I've read a lot of science fiction, and first encounter books were some of my favorite. I would LOVE to find aliens were real. Bring it on!

But there's a sad reality here. There's no good evidence that any UFO are aliens or any kind of advanced technology (except some fairly ordinary advances in plane, missile, and drone technology that get misidentified while classified, like the U2). And DeLonge is clearly laboring under a highly unrealistic set of expectations.
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
There seems to be a lot of apprehension and discomfort about the topic of this venture on Metabunk.

Could you please point to the posts that lead you to this ("lot of discomfort," here) conclusion?

...an interpretation I'm sticking to.

That is your privilege. On the other hand, I'm not thrilled wth kind of being
judged, and then--when politely requesting some (any!!) support for the
weird assertion of "discomfort"--just having the claim reasserted...
again with zero reason. Not sure how an intelligent exchange can happen on those terms.
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
but there does seem to be discomfort and disillusionment.
I am not in discomfort or disillusioned. My UFO stage ended about the age of 15. I grew up, thats all. I began to take interest in real science, philosophy, astronomy, psychology etc and began to see the whole UFO thing for what it really was, a mish-mash of hoaxers, gullible believers and fast buck merchants.

What brings it all home for me is the whole crop circle thing. I live in the English West Country, crop circle central, an even now crop circles 'appear' and UFO believers run around pointing at them and crying out they are proof of alien contact. Thing is I've met some of the crop circle makers, they are not mystic alien beings, they are a group of hippy pranksters from a small town in Wiltshire who like doing arty things in fields and laughing in pubs at the UFOlogists who take their use of rope, planks, stilts and a good GPS as proof of alien visitation. Hell for a few quid and a couple of pints they will do one for you to order. Farmers let them do it, so they can charge the UFO mob to inspect the 'phenomena'. And all this is after they have appeared in the press and on TV showing how they do it and why they do it!!

I my opinion UFO believers, along with people like Nessie hunters, para-normal investigators and the like need to take a step back, and apply a healthy dose of rational skepticism to their beliefs, and drop all the preconceptions that those who dont share their blind faith are, uncomfortable, disillusioned, in denial etc. Then I, and other more rational types might be able have a serious discussion on these topics.
 

DJC

Member
I am not in discomfort or disillusioned. My UFO stage ended about the age of 15. I grew up, thats all. I began to take interest in real science, philosophy, astronomy, psychology etc and began to see the whole UFO thing for what it really was, a mish-mash of hoaxers, gullible believers and fast buck merchants.

What brings it all home for me is the whole crop circle thing. I live in the English West Country, crop circle central, an even now crop circles 'appear' and UFO believers run around pointing at them and crying out they are proof of alien contact. Thing is I've met some of the crop circle makers, they are not mystic alien beings, they are a group of hippy pranksters from a small town in Wiltshire who like doing arty things in fields and laughing in pubs at the UFOlogists who take their use of rope, planks, stilts and a good GPS as proof of alien visitation. Hell for a few quid and a couple of pints they will do one for you to order. Farmers let them do it, so they can charge the UFO mob to inspect the 'phenomena'. And all this is after they have appeared in the press and on TV showing how they do it and why they do it!!

I my opinion UFO believers, along with people like Nessie hunters, para-normal investigators and the like need to take a step back, and apply a healthy dose of rational skepticism to their beliefs, and drop all the preconceptions that those who dont share their blind faith are, uncomfortable, disillusioned, in denial etc. Then I, and other more rational types might be able have a serious discussion on these topics.

Wow i finally agree with you guys on something aliens and "flying saucers " arent real .

although i have to disagree with your growing up at 15 statement ..i was positive star wars was a documentary til i was at least 30 ..:)
 

John85

Member
That is your privilege. On the other hand, I'm not thrilled wth kind of being
judged, and then--when politely requesting some (any!!) support for the
weird assertion of "discomfort"--just having the claim reasserted...
again with zero reason. Not sure how an intelligent exchange can happen on those terms.

You'll note I didn't say *you* were apprehensive. Perfectly happy to take you at your word. I'm apprehensive about a private venture backed by ex-defense officials that has 'entertainment' as one of its explicit goals.
 

John85

Member
I am not in discomfort or disillusioned. My UFO stage ended about the age of 15. I grew up, thats all. I began to take interest in real science, philosophy, astronomy, psychology etc and began to see the whole UFO thing for what it really was, a mish-mash of hoaxers, gullible believers and fast buck merchants.

Does it pique your interest that ex DoD and Lockheed officials are supporting a venture predicated on there being a physical reality to UFOs?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Does it pique your interest that ex DoD and Lockheed officials are supporting a venture predicated on there being a physical reality to UFOs?
A little. But the devil is in the details, and there are none. So really it’s just two guys. There’s all sorts of odd folk with curious beliefs in every industry.
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
Does it pique your interest that ex DoD and Lockheed officials are supporting a venture predicated on there being a physical reality to UFOs?
Only the vaguest sense in that what crap is going to spouted next. The world of conspiracy is packed with ex this official or former that employee about reveal this that and the other, But they never deliver, and investigations into the former whatevers back ground normally reveals they are nowhere near being the big hitter they claim to be. We've had MI5 whistleblowers who turned out to be low ranking office clerks, chemtrail insiders who turned out to be janitors, and other irreverent low level potions. Not to mention 'experts' on stuff like 9-11 who specialized in bridges with no experience at all in the workings of steel framed buildings.

I used to work for BP, I could come forward and claim some new in-depth insight into the Deep Water Horizon incident. No doubt some conspiracy theorists would take me seriously and I could make a few bucks on the lecture circuit. However my fellow debunkers here would take very little time or effort to discover that my time with BP was spent as night manager at a small petrol (gas) station, part of the companies UK retail arm, and nothing to do with their drilling operations, and I had left the job a good few years before the incident happened. But even then, those who really want to believe would stick with me and claim I was being besmirched by the powers that be.

The drummer in my band is a current Ministry of Defense employee, he works ordering rucksacks and combat boots. Just cos he works in the same (vast) organisation don't make him a trust worthy source on information about the Eurofighter Typhoon or the UKs drone program!

If the Lockheed company themselves started to endorse the idea, or one of the current crop of space tech companies, Ad Astra / Virgin Galactic / Space X / etc (some company who could stand to make BIG money from this space plane idea) or a national space agency (India, Japan, etc)... Then I would take notice, but when the 'experts' who are going to the big reveal are FORMER employees who could well turn out to be part time bog cleaners, you will forgive me for not jumping around and getting over excited about the whole idea.

And for the record, yes I am very skeptical about the whole idea, but if they do actually deliver on these promised wonders, I WILL eat my words and say I was wrong. But if 10-15 years down the line and, as I strongly suspect, this has come to nothing and lays moldering in a back draw with all the other hundreds of alien tech revealed promises will YOU be eating your words and say it all a scam, a hoax or the pipe dreams of misguided individuals? Or will you still be hanging on to the hope the latest 'big reveal'?
 
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John85

Member
I've read a lot of science fiction, and first encounter books were some of my favorite. I would LOVE to find aliens were real. Bring it on!

But there's a sad reality here. There's no good evidence that any UFO are aliens or any kind of advanced technology (except some fairly ordinary advances in plane, missile, and drone technology that get misidentified while classified, like the U2). And DeLonge is clearly laboring under a highly unrealistic set of expectations.

I don't think there is a sad reality here, and actually don't think that 'debunking' per se is an appropriate response to the TTS announcement. Unlike with other examples, there is no false claim being made which needs to be held up to reason and exposed as a sham. They are making clear their own beliefs that there is a reality worthy of study which could lead to future-defining technological breakthroughs. Anyone interested in investing ought to be extremely careful, and consider the size of the payoff against the low probability of achieving it. But is it such a bad idea to have a whole host of people download an app (if they wish) to tell them where the nearest sighting is occurring, so they can go and take photos? Should we debunk their stated intention to get insiders to reveal what knowledge they claim to have about UFO encounters? We want the evidence as much as they do, if it exists. However flawed this venture, and however well-funded and connected, let's see where they go with it. Let's say they release a video of a UFO up close, friendly aliens and all. That should be examined for evidence of fakery, and any associated claims debunked as necessary. But an announcement and funding pitch is not a claim of evidence, and so jumping on it seems to reflect discomfort borne of once believing, then doubting, then fearing having one's hopes raised again only to be disappointed again. Maybe that is not representative of your views, but it is a plausible sequence of feelings.

What I think is better is examining the 5% of reported sightings that defy conventional explanations, and seeing if there is something of substance there. There are numerous cases of sightings by multiple high-status, skilled, professional people of standing in the community, where something highly unusual is witnessed. There are cases of radar and visually confirmed sightings. There are sometimes damaging physiological effects, electromagnetic effects, psychological effects. Whether we want it to be aliens, Russian prototypes, over-unity flying cars, psyops, mental illness or whatever, the happenings themselves are unusual and significant. Let's not commit ourselves to the view that it is all nonsense to be debunked.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
and actually don't think that 'debunking' per se is an appropriate response to the TTS announcement. Unlike with other examples, there is no false claim being made which needs to be held up to reason and exposed as a sham.
it's the 'meta exemption'.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
But an announcement and funding pitch is not a claim of evidence, and so jumping on it seems to reflect discomfort borne of once believing, then doubting, then fearing having one's hopes raised again only to be disappointed again. Maybe that is not representative of your views, but it is a plausible sequence of feelings.
one of the goals of MB and fact checking/debunking in general is to help prevent people from getting ripped off by scams.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
And in the interest of general interest, if you're wondering what makes me so open-minded, here are a few example of sightings which suggest that someone is buzzing us with advanced technology:

  • WW2 foo fighters. Witnessed by Allied, German and Japanese bomber crews. They followed and circled aircrews. No flying saucer craze back then. What could they have been?
  • 1977 Colares incident, Brazil. Flying objects appeared on and off for weeks, seen by many, recorded by a doctor, said to have shone light beams that caused burns. Government team sent to investigate. Did everyone make it up?
  • 1989 black triangles over France and Belgium. Seen by dozens, fleetingly on radar, Belgian Air Force scrambled F-16s, couldn't keep up with sudden vertical acceleration.
Let's not assert 50,000 alleged possible alien ufo sightings in this thread. If you wish to start a thread (check first to see if a thread already exists) about any "evidence" you may have, then do so following Posting Guidelines.
https://www.metabunk.org/posting-guidelines.t2064/
 

John85

Member
Let's not assert 50,000 alleged possible alien ufo sightings in this thread. If you wish to start a thread (check first to see if a thread already exists) about any "evidence" you may have, then do so following Posting Guidelines.
https://www.metabunk.org/posting-guidelines.t2064/

No, I know responses to that post could get out of hand - I don't wish to plunge this thread into general chat. Thanks for quoting it though, so it lives on. All I was doing was addressing this claim:

But there's a sad reality here. There's no good evidence that any UFO are aliens or any kind of advanced technology (except some fairly ordinary advances in plane, missile, and drone technology that get misidentified while classified, like the U2). And DeLonge is clearly laboring under a highly unrealistic set of expectations

It makes sense to try to 'debunk' the TTS venture if that is your view, and it makes sense to say hold on, there might be something to this, if that is not your view. But we can't just have two competing assertions without presenting evidence in either direction. That's why I felt it necessary to indicate the evidence behind my view. If the post follows the meta exemption, then surely a response that engages with the thrust of the debunking could also be meta. Otherwise, we're just presenting opinions - and as some might say, let's go with mine!
 

txt29

Senior Member.
But we can't just have two competing assertions without presenting evidence in either direction.
I do not think so. A rationally thinking person takes UFO sightings for exactly what they are - unidentified flying objects. And unless someone presents evidence that they are something else, the UFOs remain unidentified flying objects. There is no evidence needed for that, because they are unidentified by definition. The evidence burden is on those who claim the UFOs are something specific. If it could be ETs, why it could not be the Seven Dwarfs, ghosts, witches, dinosaurs, Vikings, Russians, Mossad, CIA, Spaghetti Flying Monster, James Bond, Elvis Presley, or whatever else? Why exactly extraterrestrials?
 
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John85

Member
I do not think so. A rationally thinking person takes UFO sightings for exactly what they are - unidentified flying objects. And unless someone presents evidence that they are something else, the UFOs remain unidentified flying objects. There is no evidence needed for that, because they are unidentified by definition. The evidence burden is on those who claim the UFOs are something specific. If it could be ETs, why it could not be the Seven Dwarfs, ghosts, witches, dinosaurs, Vikings, Russians, Mossad, CIA, Spaghetti Flying Monster, James Bond, Elvis Presley, or whatever else? Why exactly extraterrestrials?

Not interested in whether it's ET, but whether it's advanced technology that could be studied and replicated, as per the aims of TTS
 

txt29

Senior Member.
Not interested in whether it's ET, but whether it's advanced technology that could be studied and replicated, as per the aims of TTS
So the first step should be presenting the evidence there is some advanced technology to be studied at all.
 

txt29

Senior Member.
What prevents you from presenting the evidence in a separate thread? However, please be advised that presenting unexplained fenomena cannot be considered an evidence for advanced technology (ET or not) just because the cause was not determined. Using the same argumentation I could equally claim it was the Spaghetti Flying Monster.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
No, I know responses to that post could get out of hand - I don't wish to plunge this thread into general chat. Thanks for quoting it though, so it lives on. All I was doing was addressing this claim:



It makes sense to try to 'debunk' the TTS venture if that is your view, and it makes sense to say hold on, there might be something to this, if that is not your view. But we can't just have two competing assertions without presenting evidence in either direction. That's why I felt it necessary to indicate the evidence behind my view. If the post follows the meta exemption, then surely a response that engages with the thrust of the debunking could also be meta. Otherwise, we're just presenting opinions - and as some might say, let's go with mine!
All I was doing was addressing this claim:
I know, that's why I did quote you in my response this time, but.. from now on be more general like "I believe there is evidence for aliens, for ex. these cases" (then link to the threads).

You can link to and/or start any other thread on MB if you feel it presents evidence. Otherwise please don't mention specific 'UFO' cases here and assert that they do present evidence, because other people will feel obligated to respond/debunk those specific cases on this thread, and then 'update information' on TTS progress will be lost to readers in a 500 page thread about every ufo claim under the sun.

If the "TTS" project mentions a specific case, then of course you can share that information here since the thread is about the TTS project.
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
...advanced technology that could be studied and replicated, as per the aims of TTS
That you accept that these are their true aims, just because they said that, is interesting to me.

Nothing about this start-up suggests to me any serious technology intent: I take them at their word
that they want to make money, selling entertainment (they really have no incentive to lie, there).

I see no reason, however, to take the more scientific claims (of 'aims') as anything more than an attempt to get
people interested in the entertainment they hope to sell. Just claiming you're planning to replicate advanced technology, will, I guess, impress some folks, but if they wanted to impress anyone even half way skeptical, they already dropped the ball with such a lame reveal on 10/11/17.

If this venture exists at all, in 2025, which I wouldn't bet on...I'd wager it's nothing but the same old entertainment.
 
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Whitebeard

Senior Member.
Another possibility to consider is that this whole thing is a rock n' roll publicity stunt. After all Mr DeLonge has just issued a new solo ep, and his band Angels & Airwaves are currently putting together a new studio album that will form the sound track to a new feature film project he has in pre-production called 'Strange Times'. (source)

And given that he has stated they 'want to sell entertainment' it does me make think this another case of a rocker cranking up the ol' hype machine.
 

Balance

Senior Member.
DeLonge was on Joe Rogan. Haven't had a chance to listen. The YT comments section is heavily negative, though.

I was cooking so had time to listen. I may have this wrong but it appears Tom (the man with flying saucer tattoos) is convinced we (earthlings) have possesion of an alien 3d-printed composite metal, which he claims has been tested to show it has the ability to create zero-point energy and anti-gravity (by blasting it with "terrahertz") to bend the space-time field. He hopes that, given enough investment and co-operation, they should be able to develop and demonstrate a proof of concept within 18months eventually allowing them to complete this technology and make a working vessel, advancing humanity.

Unfortunately, there was a lot of "I can see patterns", "can't tell you" (because he's been warned off), "read my book" or "do your research" to most of Joe's pressing enquiries.

Meanwhile he intends to encourage interest and investment via a media company producing thought-provoking sci-fi films and merchandise.
To whet appetites, he's also promised to release recently unclassified data from a FLIR satellite monitoring network that is programmed to filter out man-made flying craft.

Talk about ambitious.
 
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Gam3podia

New Member
DeLonge was on Joe Rogan. Haven't had a chance to listen. The YT comments section is heavily negative, though.
I was quite infuriated at this podcast.The insulting of intelligence is what really angers me..it was painful to watch the whole thing but I did...twice.i'm a people watcher, he did plenty of interesting "body gestures" including the sniffing, also it was clear to me(not so much in the comments of said podcast), that he was clearly baiting for money and planning on Rogan's "general public ignorance" to pay off for them.the site is a money grab.he stated that the main goal of what they are doing is too gently release the real truth of what's going on with ufo's...it's 2017 we have a cartoon character for president, people who think "non-binary" is real, we can handle the "truth".........but apparently we can't get that info unless we pay for it?....I will do everything I possibly can to stop these types of things.it disgusts me that any human would try to deceive so many people for the failing u.s. dollar.*cooincidentally I found your site from the podcast you did on mr.rogan's show.glad i did*
 

Graham2001

Active Member
Looking at the latest post about DeLonge on the BadUFOs blog and he seems to be getting into the bad habit of posting wild claims and then deleting them when people point out they are hoaxes.

http://badufos.blogspot.com.au/2017/11/tom-delonge-serial-deleter.html
 

tadaaa

Senior Member
Basically DeLonge is a UFO enthusiast, and probably a big reader of science fiction. He believes the government is hiding alien technology and has fallen for the allure of impending "disclosure". Given that he's moderately rich and famous he figures he can spend some of his money and use his celebrity status to push this along. .

and interesting parallel story to this, given the nature of DeLonge's past (Wealthy Musician with a lot of spare time) is that of Reg Presley (formerly of The Troggs)

Reg, became unexpectedly quite wealthy after the Wet Wet Wet hit "Love is all around" stormed the charts in the 90's

with time and money Reg became obsessed with "Crop Circles" and used his windfall to investigate them

He even wrote a book, Wild Things They Don’t Tell Us, which explored alien abductions, crop circles, and what he saw as the close relationship between UFOs and ancient monuments.

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...y-out-there-is-trying-to-tell-us-1422340.html

"In a field near Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, a new formation of crop circles recently appeared. Small groups of walkers tramp past in the driving rain, barely acknowledging the odd patterns in the corn. A few years ago, says Reg Presley, a veteran rock star turned crop-watcher, these hedgerows would have been lined with tourists, the press and television crews.

'Yeah, it's been discredited by all the hoaxing,' he admits sadly. 'But there's still something going on. Seventy-five per cent of the circles are probably hoaxes. I want to know who's doing the other 25 per cent.'


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbi...es-little-green-men-Trogg-thought-future.html

With a fellow scholar of the unexplained, retired Andover driving instructor Busty Taylor, Reg spent the next few years hastening to each new circle as it appeared, and offering his interpretation of the symbol’s hidden meaning.

‘We met first on July 17, 1990, at the giant crop circle at Alton Barnes near Devizes, and we became firm friends,’ Busty recalls. ‘We explored many circles together. He was of the older generation who would not hesitate to help people and talk through their possible meaning.’

Reg ascribed great significance to the fact that many circles appeared in a triangle between Warminster, Wantage and Winchester.

‘Look at the first few letters of each place,’ he told an interviewer in 1994. ‘War, Want, Win. Is that a message, or what?’

Such was worldwide enthusiasm for the crop circles that Reg and Busty were soon giving talks around the country, and going on lecture tours in the U.S. and Germany. Often, the talks would be accompanied by a Troggs gig.

When the huge success of the film Four Weddings And A Funeral brought Reg an unexpected windfall - Wet Wet Wet’s cover of Love Is All Around was used in the 1994 movie and topped the charts for 15 weeks - he used the money to fund his interest.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
Looking at the latest post about DeLonge on the BadUFOs blog and he seems to be getting into the bad habit of posting wild claims and then deleting them when people point out they are hoaxes.
not sure 2 examples over a year-plus equals 'bad habit'. and is it better if he does not delete bunk once he realizes he is posting bunk?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
and is it better if he does not delete bunk once he realizes he is posting bunk?

Deleting bunk is great, I wish Dane Wigington would delete some of the scores of things that are wrong on his site. But deleting without comment, and then continuing to post similar stuff over and over again, is possibly worse.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I think the new NYT story reveals some more misleadingness from the DeLonge thing. DeLong made it seem like Elizondo has just resigned from an active program, but the program funding was shut down in 2012.

http://archive.is/bFdkR
So basically he was running an unofficial program in his spare time. The DoD had shut it down in 2012 because it was not getting any results (and presumably because there was no real evidence the program was needed). Personally I think he resigned because they told him to stop wasting his time with this, and do his real job.

And the $22 Million does not seem to be a serious thing that the DoD wanted, instead it looks increasingly like it was just some pork for Harry Reid.

 

Z.W. Wolf

Senior Member.
This Robert Bigelow

The National Institute for Discovery Science
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Institute_for_Discovery_Science



Your tax dollars at work... Oh, my aching back.
 

Z.W. Wolf

Senior Member.
The above Wiki article identifies Colm Kelleher as the Deputy Administrator of Bigelow's now defunct UFO research program NIDS. Colm Kelleher is part of DeLonge's group.

https://dpo.tothestarsacademy.com/#the-team


Harold Puthoff is mentioned in the NYT article cited above.


Puthoff is also in Delonge's group.


Skeptical articles that mention Puthoff:

http://skepdic.com/remotevw.html


Another exciting UFO breakthrough (1998) that went nowhere:

https://www.csicop.org/si/show/massive_uncritical_publicity
 
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John85

Member
What's the problem with studying UFOs? The DeLonge group has ex-Defense officials/contractors involved, not just the scientists mentioned above. Government studies of UFOs have taken place all over the world, and conclusions are not settled.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
What's the problem with studying UFOs? The DeLonge group has ex-Defense officials/contractors involved, not just the scientists mentioned above. Government studies of UFOs have taken place all over the world, and conclusions are not settled.

There's no problem. We do it all the time here, in fact there's a dedicated sub-forum for it:
https://www.metabunk.org/forums/Skydentify/

It would also be a good idea for the military to try to identify UFOs in case they are significant, and to help understand why pilots (and their equipment) sometimes make mistakes.
 
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