ventilator vs CPAP vs oxygen discussion (split from othr thread)

Mendel

Senior Member.
If he wasn't on a ventilator, I doubt he was at death's door,
If they put you on a ventilator, your oxygen levels in your blood are below 94% or so. They do this because if organs don't get enough oxygen for a prolongued period of time, they fail.
 

Agent K

Active Member
If they put you on a ventilator, your oxygen levels in your blood are below 94% or so. They do this because if organs don't get enough oxygen for a prolongued period of time, they fail.

If they put you on a ventilator, it's a bad sign. This report from the U.K. says that 66.3% of patients receiving advanced respiratory support (e.g. ventilators) for COVID-19 died, versus 19.4% of patients receiving basic only respiratory support (e.g. oxygen) and 35.1% of patients receiving advanced support for non-COVID-19 viral pneumonia in the last couple of years.
https://www.icnarc.org/DataServices/Attachments/Download/c31dd38d-d77b-ea11-9124-00505601089b
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DavidB66

Active Member
If they put you on a ventilator, it's a bad sign. This report from the U.K. says that 66.3% of patients receiving advanced respiratory support (e.g. ventilators) for COVID-19 died, versus 19.4% of patients receiving basic only respiratory support (e.g. oxygen) and 35.1% of patients receiving advanced support for non-COVID-19 viral pneumonia in the last couple of years.

A press report today (UK Times, 14 April) says that Covid-19 patients on ventilators require fluid to be drained from the lungs much more often than for other respiratory illnesses. The designs of new ventilators are being adapted to allow for this.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
If they put you on a ventilator, it's a bad sign. This report from the U.K. says that 66.3% of patients receiving advanced respiratory support (e.g. ventilators) for COVID-19 died, versus 19.4% of patients receiving basic only respiratory support (e.g. oxygen)
I have learned that the terms are "invasive ventilation" (tube down your throat) and "noninvasive ventilation" (oxygen mask, cannula, helmet).
https://www.statnews.com/2020/04/08/doctors-say-ventilators-overused-for-covid-19/
The article has more background and also references a study.
 

Agent K

Active Member
I have learned that the terms are "invasive ventilation" (tube down your throat) and "noninvasive ventilation" (oxygen mask, cannula, helmet).
https://www.statnews.com/2020/04/08/doctors-say-ventilators-overused-for-covid-19/
The article has more background and also references a study.

Right, but when the article talks about "putting people on ventilators," it's referring to intubation, as opposed to "noninvasive devices."
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
Right, but when the article talks about "putting people on ventilators," it's referring to intubation, as opposed to "noninvasive devices."
Sure, but post #9, I was using the word in the general sense.

I was also equating your "basic only respiratory support (e.g. oxygen)" with "noninvasive ventilation", if that's what you meant?

I mean, it would be easy if we could just call these devices respirators, except that word is nw used for FFPs which actually impede respiration, so... ;-)
 

Agent K

Active Member
I was also equating your "basic only respiratory support (e.g. oxygen)" with "noninvasive ventilation", if that's what you meant?

Yes.

Sure, but post #9, I was using the word in the general sense.

But you were replying to post #8 that was probably using it in the invasive ventilation sense, which is what's typically meant by "on a ventilator" as opposed to "on oxygen."
 
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