Rotten eggs smell not from Chemtrails, claim scientists

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I'd seen a few posts on Facebook concerned this was from Chemtrails. But will the official story hold water?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48992509#.UFH49Wt5mSM

 

scombrid

Senior Member.
The lake stratifies in the heat and calm of summer. Hydrogen sulfide builds up in the hypoxic to anoxic bottom water. Shortening days and change in weather in September initiate fall "turnover" when the water column mixes.


https://springerlink3.metapress.com...12qz4sdp20zobmwwmnjoi&sh=www.springerlink.com


[h=1]Thermal, mixing, and oxygen regimes of the Salton Sea, California, 1997–1999 [/h]James M. Watts, Brandon K. Swan, MaryAnn Tiffany and Stuart H. Hurlbert


[h=2]Abstract[/h]The Salton Sea is a shallow (mean depth = 8 m; maximum depth = 15 m), saline (41–45 g l–1), intermittently mixing, 57 km long, 980 km2 lake located in the arid southwestern United States. The Sea is a wind driven system, with predominant winds paralleling the long axis of the lake, being strongest in spring and weakest in summer and fall. The Sea mixed daily or nearly daily between September and January. During this cooling period, moderate to high levels of dissolved oxygen (3–11 mg l–1) were found throughout the water column. Mean water column temperature ranged from a minimum of 13–14 °C in early January to a maximum of 30–34 °C in July–September. During most of this warming period, the Sea was thermally stratified but subject to periodic wind driven mixing events. Winds were stronger in spring 1998 than in 1997 or 1999, causing more rapid heating of the lake that year and also delaying onset of anoxic conditions in bottom waters. During summer months, mid-lake surface waters were sometimes supersatured with oxygen, and bottom waters were hypoxic or anoxic with sulfide concentrations > 5 mg l–1. Oxic conditions (> 1 mg O2 l–1) often extended a few meters deeper nearshore than they did well offshore as a consequence of greater mixing nearshore. Mixing events in late summer deoxygenated the entire water column for a period of days. Consumption of oxygen by sulfide oxidation likely was the principal mechanism for these deoxygenation events. Sulfide concentrations in surface waters were 0.5–1 mg l–1 approximately 3 days after one mixing event in mid-August 1999. These mixing events were associated with population crashes of phytoplankters and zooplankters and with large fish kills. In the southern basin, freshwater inflows tended to move out over the surface of the Sea mixing with saline lake water as a function of wind conditions. Salinity gradients often contributed more to water column stability than did thermal gradients in the southeasternmost portion of the lake.
 
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scombrid

Senior Member.
Hydrogen sulfide burping out of the muck in the Elizabeth River in southeast Virginia got trapped under a nocturnal thermal inversion. Even though it happens all the time, the goldfish memoried people in nearby neighborhoods decide that it is something nefarious and call the news. The news people are idiot communications majors that didn't pay attention in science class so they share in the publics wonderment. The news people are also looking for sensation so they'll hype up any crackpot idea before they seek a rational answer if they seek a rational answer at all. So the Virginia sulfur smell has been added to the "sulfur smell outbreak" in the world of internet conspiracy theories.


Meanwhile, the smell isn't new. I grew up with that smell in southeast Virginia. Always happened after low tide when the incoming tide pushed the gas up out of the marsh and then the smell would build up on calm cool nights when there is little atmospheric mixing. The rotten egg smell was just a part of growing up near a salty or brackish marsh. It was very common in the late summer when water temperatures were still high and microbial activity still high and producing lots of gas but on the cool clear nights after cold fronts passed when radiational cooling was good you'd get a strong shallow inversion with smells trapped at the surface where you notice them.
 

scombrid

Senior Member.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zutUFr0Hxiw&feature=watch_response_rev

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9Qq4IrL4fU&list=UUHE92x768p8h-fMrqhsnE1Q&index=2&feature=plcp

Seems to be similar to last year when the "mass animal die offs" were becoming a "plague" of sorts. It wasn't because the kills were actually unusually large or unusually frequent it just happened that people became hyper-vigilant and gave huge weight and significance to unrelated events. You get something odd like the black birds dieing on New Years Eve and suddenly people start paying attention and hyping up any and all mortality events and pretending that they are related when there isn't good reason to suspect such.
 

Jay Reynolds

Senior Member.
I smelled a rotten smell early this week as I headed south across the marsh north of New Orleans. Probably some of the smell was due to dead stuff rotting after hurricane Isaac the week before, but I often can tell when I get down to the marshes, just by the smell.
 
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