Foamy "clouds" on the ground in Doukkala, Morocco

cmnit

Member
A Moroccan YT user (probably contributing to yousspress.com network) few days ago posted a video showing strange fluffy, foamy "clouds" on the ground, or rolling with the wind, in the Doukkala region, Morocco:


Some online news sites reported the story as week, like this Moroccan one:
https://www.moroccoworldnews.com/20...rom-the-sky-spark-discussion-on-social-media/

Needless to say, clickbait sites went wild over this, and chemtrailists reposted the video around the usual, boring explanation of geoengineering activities.

After a quick and superficial search, looking for a rational explanation, I have found the horrible story of the Bangalore lake:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/gallery/2015/oct/01/lake-toxic-foam-bangalore-india-in-pictures
but of course it is difficult to judge the nature of such phenomenon only looking casually to visual evidence.

Ideas, anyone?
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
It looks like ordinary sea foam to me. That region is on the Atlantic coast and there have been a lot of vigorous storms in the North Atlantic recently. It's not clear from the video whether it was shot right on the coast - the camera operator seems to make a point of not showing the surroundings clearly, and keeps whipping the camera around, but it looks as if you can see the sea in the background at times.

Other examples:



 

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
It does look like sea foam, you can hear the sea in the vid.. And large amounts being washed ashore isn't that unusual. This is from Australia in 2013
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_foam
Sea foam, ocean foam, beach foam, or spume is a type of foam created by the agitation of seawater, particularly when it contains higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter (including proteins, lignins, and lipids)[1] derived from sources such as the offshore breakdown of algal blooms. These compounds can act as surfactants or foaming agents. As the seawater is churned by breaking waves in the surf zone adjacent to the shore, the presence of these surfactants under these turbulent conditions traps air, forming persistent bubbles that stick to each other through surface tension. Due to its low density and persistence, foam can be blown by strong on-shore winds from the beachface inland.
Content from External Source
Whats more sea foam is often whipped by heavy weather out at sea and the Eastern Atlantic coasts have been hit by a series of large storms over the past few weeks.
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
I'm trying to track down the location. All the reports just say "Doukkala", which is just a region of Morocco.

upload_2016-2-9_15-35-45.png


Comments on some of the videos suggest it may be Jorf Lasfar, which is an industrial area with a large phosphate plant. Phosphates are found in detergents and can be associated with foaming - either directly or by providing nutrients for foam-forming algae.

upload_2016-2-9_15-40-24.png

upload_2016-2-9_15-44-44.png
 

Lisa P

Active Member
I used to play in the sea foam 40+ years ago when I was a kid, actually tell the truth as an adult too! It happens nearly every year when we get cyclones and the sea is whipped into a frenzy (North-east coast of Australia). The sea foam I have seen breaks up this looks more like the foam in India caused by a polluted waterway. Sea foam is very brown whereas the foam from industry is whiter and slightly more solid. The one in India had something to do with sewerage.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...wage-pumped-creates-toxic-clouds-bubbles.html
 
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