Dark irregular shaped object drifting in the sky [Castle Mylar Party Balloon]

deirdre

Senior Member.
Ask him if he ever watches the cricket when the camera is behind the umpire. Does he think the bowler and batsman are 1 metre apart?
I'm not understanding your comparison here. Many experienced pilots have trouble deciphering the size of objects against the sky. Even Dreyfuss, in Jaws, made Brody walk to the end of the plank for 'scale' in his shot with an ocean background.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
Certain low angles in sports make it look like things are much closer to each other than they really are.
:) I realize that. I am saying that I don't understand how this camera phenomenon equates to seeing something in the sky with your own eyes. The OP also took photos without a zoom.

And even if he only had a zoom, the sky is different than a baseball shot because there are no visual clues in the sky to tell you WHERE the object is relative to anything else.

I thought this was a model rocket or a remote-control toy. Turns out it is a big ol military jet. But the truth is it could be a model toy.. there is nothing in the picture to give us any indication of Where/distance the object is in the sky, so it's size cannot be determined unless you're someone who happens to know it is a military jet.
40665925_235413990657944_2253748427462541312_n.jpg
from: https://www.metabunk.org/castle-in-the-sky-huawei-phone-digital-glitch-海市蜃楼-华为.t9959/
 

Gary McH-P

Member
A remarkable coincidence. This time it's a flying car in the skies above South Yorkshire.

They really ought to attach stronger string to those balloons!
 
I'm not understanding your comparison here. Many experienced pilots have trouble deciphering the size of objects against the sky. Even Dreyfuss, in Jaws, made Brody walk to the end of the plank for 'scale' in his shot with an ocean background.

My point was how can he determine that what he's looking at is bigger than the Balloon from where he is standing.

Thinking about it now, you are right. My analogy was wrong as you have the umpire and the batsman as reference points for when you move from behind to the side. But here we're comapring size not distance. So I detract my analogy.

But I still ask, how can he determine the size of 'his object' being bigger than the balloons size?
 
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