Corellation between Perigee moons and earthquakes?

FuzzyUK

Active Member
This weekend heralds a full moon known as a supermoon. Due to the moon's elliptical orbit and it's present perigee position when it is at closest to earth it will appear 14% bigger than at any other time of the year.
http://spaceweather.com/archive.php?view=1&day=23&month=06&year=2013

Astrologer Theodore White, a self proclaimed Astrometeorologist, in his 2013 Summer blogspot claims that earthquakes are stronger during perigee moons:

The Perigee Moons Of May, June & July 2013:Earthquakes, Storms & Geophysical Instability

As the perigee moon of June and July near, we can expect to hear of a wide range of geophysical disturbances, including earthquakes, some large magnitude, worldwide.

Although there are always some kind of seismic activity; when there are astrological configurations strong enough relative to the Earth, we experience stronger seismic activity. So it will be during the months of lunar perigees.
http://globalastrologyblog.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/the-cardinal-crisis-perigee-supermoons.html

Further more:
The closest perigee moon will take place on June 23, 2013. This means that between June 20 through 27 overall, there should a variety of geophysical events that make headline news.

In the annals of Astrometeorology, it is well known that when 'super-moons' occur, they spark geophysical events ranging from large magnitude earthquakes, to strong storms with gusty winds and powerful tornadoes.

There are storms of torrential rains that causes flooding that can strike farmlands and multiple urban areas.

Putting aside the fact that it's a windy day in the UK, where is the evidence that increased earthquakes activity and strong quakes occur during perigee moons?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
See:
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/b...t-cause-the-japanese-earthquake/#.Uccpyz6wzow
http://www.popsci.com/science/artic...st-certainly-wont-cause-huge-natural-disaster

and in particular:
http://www.livescience.com/33106-will-supermoon-cause-earthquake-storm-natural-disasters.html
According to John Vidale, a seismologist at the University of Washington in Seattle and director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, particularly dramatic land and ocean tides do trigger earthquakes. "Both the moon and sun do stress the Earth a tiny bit, and when we look hard we can see a very small increase in tectonic activity when they're aligned," Vidale told Life's Little Mysteries.
At times of full and new moons, "you see a less-than-1-percent increase in earthquake activity, and a slightly higher response in volcanoes ."


The effect of tides on seismic activity is greatest in subduction zones such as the Pacific Northwest, where one tectonic plate is sliding under another. William Wilcock, another seismologist at the University of Washington, explained: "When you have a low tide, there's less water, so the pressure on the seafloor is smaller. That pressure is clamping the fault together, so when it's not there, it makes it easier for the fault to slip."


According to Wilcock, earthquake activity in subduction zones at low tides is 10 percent higher than at other times of the day, but he hasn't observed any correlations between earthquake activity and especially low tides at new and full moons. Vidale has observed only a very small correlation.


What about during a lunar perigee? Can we expect more earthquakes and volcanic eruptions on March 19, when the full moon will be so close?


The moon's gravitational pull at lunar perigee, the scientists say, is not different enough from its pull at other times to significantly change the height of the tides and thus the likelihood of natural disasters. "A lot of studies have been done on this kind of thing by USGS scientists and others," John Bellini, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey, told Life's Little Mysteries. "They haven't found anything significant at all."


Vidale concurred. "Practically speaking, you'll never see any effect of lunar perigee," he said. "It's somewhere between 'It has no effect' and 'It's so small you don't see any effect.'"

The bottom line is, the upcoming supermoon won't cause
a preponderance of earthquakes , although the idea isn't a crazy one. "Earthquakes don't respond as much to the tides as you'd think they would. There should actually be more of an effect," said Vidale.
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Soulfly

Banned
Banned
I have far too many friends that buy into the super moon hype. I can live with people not knowing what it means or how often they really happen. What bothers me is when they say shit like. "Supermoon is about to make my day awesome. Sooooo feeding off of this energy." And when I ask how this energy works I get called negative and a troll. :mad: I asked what forces are at work and I got the reply of gravity.
http://earthsky.org/space/does-the-supermoon-have-a-super-effect-on-us
When the moon is closest to the Earth, its gravitational pull is at its peak.
So the question becomes, how much does the moon’s gravitational influence on Earth vary from minimum (apogee, or farthest point from the planet) to maximum (perigee)?
I will not bore you (or scare you!) with the math, but the variation from minimum lunar pull to maximum pull is roughly 23 percent. That sounds like a lot. However, it amounts to less than 2 ten-thousandths of the mass (or less precisely, the “weight”) of the moon.
More importantly from an astrological perspective (I presume, since I decidedly am not an astrologer) would be the effect on a human being. Consider an 80-kilogram (176-pound) human being. The maximum difference between apogean and perigean moons is about 73 milligrams, or about 1/14th the mass of an ordinary paper clip. If you factor in the solar gravity effect for a supermoon, or full moon closest to Earth, this effect may rise to about 110 milligrams, roughly equivalent to about 1/9th the mass of a paperclip.
In either case, the effects are imperceptible, and far smaller than those encountered in other everyday situations, such as being near a mountain or even a large building.
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Pete Tar

Senior Member.
....The maximum difference between apogean and perigean moons is about 73 milligrams, or about 1/14th the mass of an ordinary paper clip. If you factor in the solar gravity effect for a supermoon, or full moon closest to Earth, this effect may rise to about 110 milligrams, roughly equivalent to about 1/9th the mass of a paperclip.
In either case, the effects are imperceptible, and far smaller than those encountered in other everyday situations, such as being near a mountain or even a large building.
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For people who believe that diluting a substance in water one part in one trillion will still effect them, believing they are affected by this energy this shouldn't be a problem.
 
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