Who Owns Dominion Voting Systems Corp? Not Avid Technologies. Not Richard Blum.

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Someone shared a link to this Drudge-Report themed site that's pumping a lot of election-related disinformation. They make this claim:
Article:

Sen. Feinstein’s Husband Owns 60% Of Software Co Used To Steal Trump Votes In Swing States​


A so-called computer ‘glitch’ in one of Michigan’s counties that caused 6,000 votes for Trump to be counted for Biden, which, when fixed, switched the county from a Biden win to a Trump win, is now looking even more corrupt. The Dominion software responsible for this incredible error was not only used exclusively in other swing states, but has a curious investor who holds a majority ownership in the company. California Democrat Senator Diane Feinstein’s husband happens to own 60% of Avid Technologies, Inc, the business that owns the software. According to public records of ownership, Feinstein’s husband, Richard C. Blum, is the chairman and president of Blum Capital, the company that owns the ‘Dominion’ software that’s allegedly “glitching” votes in favor of Joe Biden.​



Dominion Voting Systems is a Canadian company with a US office in Denver, Colorado
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominion_Voting_Systems
They make this type of thing, voting machines and associated software.
2020-11-09_11-48-27.jpg

Avid Technology, Inc, is mostly a video editing software company, based in Burlington, Massachusets
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avid_Technology
They make this type of thing, industry-standard video editors used for editing major motion pictures and TV.
2020-11-09_11-46-36.jpg

Dominion is owned by its management team (mostly founder John Poulos) and Staple Street Capital
https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rel...team-and-staple-street-capital-300681752.html

So, other than disinfo sites, there seems to be no connection between Avid and Dominion.

Not only that, Richard Blum does not own 60% of Avid (the company that does NOT own Dominion). He has a maybe 15% stake in Blum Capital, and Blum Capital owns about 15% of Avid, (which again, does not make or own any voting software). So he owns about 2% of an irrelevant company.

2020-11-08_11-52-23.jpg
 
Last edited:

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Claims of links of Avid to Dominion continue. It's a claim seemingly pulled out of thin air, reminiscent of some QAnon claims.

They are a media editing company. Mostly video editing and music editing. Here is a list of all their products.

https://www.avid.com/products

There is zero connection to Dominion, or any other voting software company.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
From last year:
Article:
Mitch McConnell Received Donations from Voting Machine Lobbyists Before Blocking Election Security Bills
[..]
The plans would likely burden the two largest electronic voting machine vendors in the United States, Election Systems & Software and Dominion Voting Systems, with new regulations and financial burdens. Together, the companies make up about 80 percent of all voting machines used in the country and both have far-reaching lobbying arms in Washington D.C. Many of those lobbyists have contributed to the McConnell campaign, reported Sludge last month, an investigative outlet that focuses on money in politics.

Sludge found that Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck lobbyist David Cohen, who has worked on behalf of Dominion Voting Systems this year, donated $2,000 to McConnell during this time. Brian Wild, who works with Cohen and has also lobbied Dominion, gave McConnell $1,000.

Around the same time, on February 19 and March 4 Emily Kirlin and Jen Olson, who have lobbied on behalf of Election Systems & Software over the last year donated $1,000 to McConnell each.

Thursday's first bill, presented by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer would authorize $775 million to bolster election security and require states to keep paper trails of all votes cast.

I don't know whether any bills were passed subsequently.
I don't think there's a conspiracy, just Republicans doing their thing opposing regulation.

Edit: Later that year, some money was allocated, but no new regulations:
Article:
Senators thawed a long-frozen dispute over election security this week with an agreement to provide more funding ahead of Election Day next year — but not as much as some Democrats and outside activists say is necessary.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., agreed to add $250 million for election security after having held up earlier legislation.

The money will be used by the federal government and the states, he said, and in a way that McConnell argues is appropriate for the federal system and without unreasonable new mandates from Congress.
 
Last edited:

deirdre

Senior Member.
Later that year, some money was allocated,
dec 2019
https://www.npr.org/2019/12/16/7884...lion-for-election-security-in-new-legislation
 

Amber Robot

Active Member
Let me put my tinfoil hat on before addressing this:

--The fact that no connection can be found is proof of how good a cover it is. --
 

jdawg

New Member
No, but they do have ownership in AVID Technologies, which has had Election Suite software such as LeaderPlus.
These softwares are used to establish/integrate live feeds between votes & mainstream media TV/Web interfaces, and I'd certainly think that would've had some conflict of interest at some point.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
No, but they do have ownership in AVID Technologies, which has had Election Suite software such as LeaderPlus.
These softwares are used to establish/integrate live feeds between votes & mainstream media TV/Web interfaces, and I'd certainly think that would've had some conflict of interest at some point.
False.

LeaderPlus is an old product that Avid retired in 2012, stopping support in 2015.
https://avid.secure.force.com/pkb/articles/en_US/FAQ/End-of-support-dates

2020-11-09_22-23-56.jpg

They have had no other election-specific software.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
These softwares are used to establish/integrate live feeds between votes & mainstream media TV/Web interfaces, and I'd certainly think that would've had some conflict of interest at some point.
How?
Avid was selling software to TV stations. Source from 2006:
Article:
Some 140 stations used specialized software from editing and graphics supplier Avid Technology to automate their election coverage last week. The system, called LeaderPlus, helps stations cover voting results by ingesting multiple wire feeds and Web polling data, then linking to graphics systems to automatically create on-air updates of voting action.

How does that create a conflict of interest with government?
 
Top