Invisibility cloaked jet?

Its not using any height data from lidar or whatever, its just 'guessing' a height mesh from 2d images.
Thus it could of seen these stains and its algorithm thought Oh that looks like a plane thus lets create a plane heightmesh here
Where in your video does it say that?

Your video explains that Google uses photogrammetry, which uses several images of the same object to determine its location in space.
Screenshot_20240211-204943_Samsung Internet.jpg

A special case, called stereophotogrammetry, involves estimating the three-dimensional coordinates of points on an object employing measurements made in two or more photographic images taken from different positions (see stereoscopy). Common points are identified on each image. A line of sight (or ray) can be constructed from the camera location to the point on the object. It is the intersection of these rays (triangulation) that determines the three-dimensional location of the point.

For more details, see Wikipedia.
 
You're right its using stereophotogrammetry, by measuring the distances of what it thinks are the same objects it can 'guess' the approx height with some trig, Its not going to be accurate (mainly limited by the resolution of the image), as you can easily see by looking at google earth in 3D.
If that used LIDAR or something similar where they actually measure the distances/heights then the 'ghost' aircraft wouldn't of happened.
I'm guessing the plane smudge is just confusing its reference points used by the algorithm.
Actually I don't think its using AI now, after looking a 3D google earth of where I live I spot lots of errors, as I would expect AI to a much better job, eg not have various things floating up in the air
 
If that used LIDAR or something similar where they actually measure the distances/heights then the 'ghost' aircraft wouldn't of happened.
Yes, it would. The 3D data and the texture photo are out of sync, that would happen no matter how the 3D was originally generated.

I'm guessing the plane smudge is just confusing its reference points used by the algorithm.
There's no reason to assume it would. Trigonometry doesn't card what a shape looks like.
 
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