Explained: Jupiter Photos look the same [Composite photo]

Jonathan Evans

New Member
These two images of Jupiter look Identical, apart from the newest one has Auroras at the Pole, will anyone be able to help me in explaining the reasoning behind the fact that two photos are practically identical ?
The one without Auroras was taken in 2014 and the one with apparently in 2016 can anyone help me out, The [] you-tuber Russianvids did a video of this and i would be happy if you could help me with explanations.
Was the Auroras a separate images that has just been superposed onto an image of Jupiter ?

Thnx again;)

HubbleJGRS_900.jpg hs-2016-24-a-print-new.jpg
 
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Jonathan Evans

New Member
ok after a bit of poking around on NASA website I think i found it myself.

Here is the statement "The full-color disk of Jupiter in this image was separately photographed at a different time by Hubble's Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, a long-term Hubble project that annually captures global maps of the outer planets" http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/24

ah so it turns out the Auroras where indeed superimposed onto to an older photo :).

you see Flat Earthers can learn a lot from a little bit of research :p
I'm actually really happy i found it my self, but I will leave this thread here so people can see it XD
 
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Spectrar Ghost

Senior Member.
It looks like the newer image is a 2016 image of the aurora superimposed over the 2014 image. The aurora is from the video here (can't seem to copy it to embed from my phone):

http://www.sci-news.com/astronomy/hubble-auroras-jupiter-03989.html

upload_2016-7-14_22-38-27.png


The combined image also seems to originate at that link. Since the auroral images are in UV, the planet's details aren't visible. Taking a file photo and superimposing the aurora makes it more recognizable.

Edit: Obviously I took too long composing this. Good find.
 
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DJC

Member
ok after a bit of poking around on NASA website I think i found it myself.

Here is the statement "The full-color disk of Jupiter in this image was separately photographed at a different time by Hubble's Outer Planet Atmospheres Legacy (OPAL) program, a long-term Hubble project that annually captures global maps of the outer planets" http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2016/24

ah so it turns out the Auroras where indeed superimposed onto to an older photo :).

you see Flat Earthers can learn a lot from a little bit of research :p
I'm actually really happy i found it my self, but I will leave this thread here so people can see it XD
in other words its a completely fake photo ....?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Off topic post removed.

The topic is why this photo looked like the photo without the aurora. The answer is that it's a composite photo.

If you want to discuss the provenance of the individual photos, then that needs too be in a different thread.
 
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