Aircraft weight and balance in the real world

MikeC

Closed Account
I read in a post on here recently that some "whistleblower" had said that loading "chemtrail chemicals" was kept from pilots, etc.

Completely serendipitously the Australian Transportation Safety Board (their equivalent of the NTSB in the USA) is investigating 2 events where A320 aircraft were misloaded....

One of them the aircraft was nose-heavy - the pilots had to use more effort than usual to lift the nose for takeoff. Upon flying they asked the cabin crew to check the numbers and seating of the passengers - when they fed these numbers into their flight computer het center of gravity was found outside acceptable limits......meaning the controls had barely enough force to maneuver the aircraft!

In the 2nd the pilots were not advised of the correct number of passengers on board - their calculations were made with 16 less than the actual - a difference of 1300 or so kg.

Just how it is that someone is supposed to "sneak" chemtrail chemicals and apparatus onto an aircraft without the pilot noticing is beyond comprehension to any and all who actually work in the industry......but of course not to the CT's to whom imagination is more important than reality.
 

Chew

Senior Member
Iirc there was a crash in the US a few years ago and one of the contributing factors was the weight of the passengers. The standard weight was 150 lbs per passenger but due to the obesity epidemic in the US the FAA bumped it up to 180 lbs/passenger.

So if the chemtrail urban legend is true, how much chemtrail juice could be added to jet fuel without the pilots noticing a degradation in performance, range, weight and balance and still generate hundreds of cubic kilometers of chemtrails?
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member
I remember reading accounts of bomber pilots of all sides in ww2 being trained to expect an upwards 'kick' once the payload was released, as a plane became a lot lighter and rose as a consequence, in the case of a Lancaster with a full bomb load the altitude gain could be up to 1,000ft.

IF you consider the amount of material needed for even short 'chemtrail' then surely as the 'chemtrail' is laid the pilot would notice the aircraft becoming lighter, and climbing slightly as the payload was sprayed? Surely this would be dead give away that something odd was happening.
 

Clunk

New Member
That crash was a Beech 1900D, Air Midwest 5481. Even though it was a small turboprop it was just the wrong average weight used for the passengers that (partially) caused it. Emirates have had two very close calls, at Johannesburg and Melbourne, where the wrong weights were used for the takeoff speed calculations. The dangers of using incorrect weights for takeoff and landing are massive and the performance of the aircraft depends so much on its weight that you can't hide any 'phantom' load.
 

Retired

New Member
Here is a quick and dirty explanation of how W&B is calculated. When the aircraft is manufactured, the a/c manufacturer weighs each aircraft and determine its BOW or Basic Operating Weight and CG or Center of Gravity. This follows the aircraft throughout its life and anytime an apparatus is installed, it is entered into the a/c logs and the weight and arm is added to the BOW and CG.

Payload (cargo and passengers) is determined by the difference between the BOW and the MAX ZFW or Maximum Zero Fuel Weight. Anything above the Max ZFW must be fuel. Airlines want to maximize the payload as this is how they make money (or lose less), so anything that deminishes the payload will not be put on the a/c unless for satety reasons or it makes money.

The passenger section is broken down into zones that have its own arm (for CG purposes) and the passengers are accounted for by a average weight. The FAA also allows "child" weight if enough children are in that section. The cargo is also broken down to forward and aft cargo sections with their own arm as well. The palates of cargo are weighed and this is all put into a computor and out comes the GW or Gross Weight, CWGC or Gross Weight CG, the MZFW and the MZFW CG. These figures are entered into the FMC or Flight Management Computor telling the computers onboard what to expect inflight.

I can't see where all the dispersement apparatus and chemtrail chems could "hide" in this procedure.
 

Gridlock

Active Member
The series "Mayday" aka "Air Crash Investigation" is interesting viewing, a couple of accidents were caused by payload errors. One flight was a charter, returning soldiers home, so instead of a mix of people of varying weights you had 200 great big guys all carrying a bunch of equipment. Using the standard weight-per-passenger assumption caused the crash.

Aircraft aren't vans. You can make an entire career out of putting stuff in the back of them: https://www.airforce.com/careers/detail/aircraft-loadmaster/
 
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