The American Nightmare. Slavery by the Back Door

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
Land of the Free... Appears not! Would any brave person care to debunk or justify this ... or at least comment!

So what is it about American culture that Americans appear to find it acceptable that 2.5 Million Americans should be incarcerated and used as slave labour by private companies?



Why does America incarcerate massively more of it's citizens than any other Nation on Earth? Are Americans more violent and prone to crime than any other culture? Or is the U.S government tyrannically and deliberately providing slave fodder for private companies?

And why has such a steep increase happened since 1980 to date... 500,000 to 2.5 Million in the space of 30 years?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:US_incarceration_timeline-clean-fixed-timescale.svg

 
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Grieves

Senior Member
There are apparently more African Americans participating in prison-labor programs today than were ever enslaved in the history of the United States. It's a highly unfortunate but relatively deliberate state of affairs, largely sourced in exaggerated punishments around petty drug crimes and brutal 'three strike' state laws that see you locked away for years if three crimes are committed, no matter how minor. It's a statistical fact that those who are imprisoned on petty crimes are likely to commit far more serious offenses on their release, the private prison system, rather than rehabilitating, actually often makes more hardened criminals of the people who pass through it. It's 'class warfare' at its finest, really. The wealthy like to whine about those parasitic poor trying to leech away their hard-earned millions as a form of 'class warfare', while encouraging an economic climate where the poor get poorer, crime rates rise, and cheap American prison-labor abounds as a result.

Still, so far as I know they don't have workers on prison-lines going back to their cells after a shift only to be expected to grind gold on World of Warcraft for eight hours straight, so I suppose the American prison system isn't quite as bad as that of China yet.
 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
There are apparently more African Americans participating in prison-labor programs today than were ever enslaved in the history of the United States. It's a highly unfortunate but relatively deliberate state of affairs, largely sourced in exaggerated punishments around petty drug crimes and brutal 'three strike' state laws that see you locked away for years if three crimes are committed, no matter how minor. It's a statistical fact that those who are imprisoned on petty crimes are likely to commit far more serious offenses on their release, the private prison system, rather than rehabilitating, actually often makes more hardened criminals of the people who pass through it. It's 'class warfare' at its finest, really. The wealthy like to whine about those parasitic poor trying to leech away their hard-earned millions as a form of 'class warfare', while encouraging an economic climate where the poor get poorer, crime rates rise, and cheap American prison-labor abounds as a result.

Still, so far as I know they don't have workers on prison-lines going back to their cells after a shift only to be expected to grind gold on World of Warcraft for eight hours straight, so I suppose the American prison system isn't quite as bad as that of China yet.

Here are the Incarceration rates per 100,000, by Country. Seems an inordinate difference between the lowest at 59 per 100,000 and the highest, 743 per 100,000.

Also seems very suspect that it should climb so steeply from 1980 onwards. Wondered what people felt about it. Seems like government sponsored slavery to me.

http://corrections.oregonafscme.com/private/prison_privatization.htm

 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
It's a combination of factors, the war on drugs, the privatization of prisons for profit leading to lobbying for higher sentencing, and the the "tough on crime" trap that politicians fell into in the 1980's leading to ludicrous sentencing laws like "three strikes".

It disproportionately affects minorities because they are poor.

You could hardly say it's some kind of back-door slavery conspiracy, given that it would be much cheaper to actually hire people to do the work than to keep them in prison.

It is terrible, a stain upon America. I think it's one of the REAL problems in America, and it would be great if people could attack it with the same vigor they attack imaginary problems like chemtrails.
 

SR1419

Senior Member.
The wealthy like to whine about those parasitic poor trying to leech away their hard-earned millions as a form of 'class warfare', while encouraging an economic climate where the poor get poorer, crime rates rise, and cheap American prison-labor abounds as a result. .

Actually- the US crime rate has been declining:

http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Justic...st-point-in-decades.-Why-America-is-safer-now

And prisoners who do participate in labor programs are less likely to go back to prison after release and more likely to find jobs after release.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/15/b...ral-prisons-for-contracts.html?pagewanted=all
 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
It's a combination of factors, the war on drugs, the privatization of prisons for profit leading to lobbying for higher sentencing, and the the "tough on crime" trap that politicians fell into in the 1980's leading to ludicrous sentencing laws like "three strikes".

It disproportionately affects minorities because they are poor.

It is terrible, a stain upon America. I think it's one of the REAL problems in America, and it would be great if people could attack it with the same vigor they attack imaginary problems like chemtrails.

Yes, very little seems to be heard about it. I don't understand why it isn't a much bigger issue. Do you know of any campaigns with traction on this subject. I would have thought people would be much more vocal on the issue.

You could hardly say it's some kind of back-door slavery conspiracy, given that it would be much cheaper to actually hire people to do the work than to keep them in prison.

I don't understand the rationale of this comment though as, if the penal system is run for profit by private companies, it cannot cost money to keep people in prison... no more than it cost landowners to keep slaves.
 

SR1419

Senior Member.
I don't understand the rationale of this comment though as, if the penal system is run for profit by private companies, it cannot cost money to keep people in prison... no more than it cost landowners to keep slaves.

What? of course, it costs money to keep people in prison....

Moreover, "the penal system" is not run for profit by private companies- the vast majority of prisons are still public institutions and the vast majority of prisoners are held in these public institutions- although the rate is changing:

http://www.propublica.org/article/by-the-numbers-the-u.s.s-growing-for-profit-detention-industry
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I don't understand the rationale of this comment though as, if the penal system is run for profit by private companies, it cannot cost money to keep people in prison... no more than it cost landowners to keep slaves.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-3445_162-57418495/the-cost-of-a-nation-of-incarceration/

The profit comes from the government giving them money to store prisoners. Prison labor schemes are just icing.

And as noted, the entire system is not private prisons, only a proportion. However the introduction of for-profit prisons has led to lobbying to maintain tough sentences to maintain the prison population.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member

SR1419

Senior Member.
California's 3 strikes law was revised this past election cycle:

http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.p...36,_Changes_in_the_"Three_Strikes"_Law_(2012)

 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
California's 3 strikes law was revised this past election cycle:

http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.p...36,_Changes_in_the_"Three_Strikes"_Law_(2012)


I do not understand the mindset of the people who voted against proposition 66, back in 2004, any ideas? Or how the 3 strikes sentencing originated in the first place. IMO each crime should be judged on it's own merit, (unmerit).

http://ballotpedia.org/wiki/index.p...66,_Changes_in_the_"Three_Strikes"_Law_(2004)
 

SR1419

Senior Member.
I do not understand the mindset of the people who voted against proposition 66, back in 2004, any ideas?

Not sure...you would have to ask someone who voted against it. but if you look at the yes/no map- I think it closely parallels how CA divides out on the "red/blue" party lines...

Prop_66_2004.png
 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
There does appear to be some similarity in the California voting demographic



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_strikes_law
Application

The exact application of the three strikes laws varies considerably from state to state.
Some states require one or more of the three felony convictions to be for violent crimes in order for the mandatory sentence to be pronounced. California mandates the enhanced sentence for any third felony conviction so long as the first two felonies were deemed to be either "violent" or "serious," or both. Texas does not require any of the felony convictions to be violent.

http://www.alternet.org/story/155199/private_prison_corporations_are_modern_day_slave_traders

Private Prison Corporations Are Modern Day Slave Traders


Another link to population rise and private corporation lobbying

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentis...s-lobbyists-keep-lock-private-prison-business

Guess 180 year prison sentences don't really help... But good for corporations!
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
The "Law and Order" movement was predominantly (but not exclusively) Republican, and is at the root of these extreme sentencing laws.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_and_order_(politics)

 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
Tip of the iceberg?

No mention of any action against the prison owners?

http://blog.blacknews.com/2013/05/j...lling-kids-prison-system101.html#.UYQjM8oROe8

 

Grieves

Senior Member
What a total scumbag. Slavery alive and well again in America.
http://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/feds-studying-private-prisons-as-way-to-save-money-1.967126
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2011/01/10/tories-prison-infrastructure.html
and not long off here... mega-prisons, privatization, and all in spite of this.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2012/07/24/crime-stats-canada.html
Statistics compiled by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) and released Tuesday by Statistics Canada showed that the crime rate in 2011 was at its lowest level in 39 years.
 

Grieves

Senior Member
http://www.timesleader.com/apps/pbc...0110127&category=news&lopenr=301279998&Ref=AR

The changes, which must be approved by a judge, increase the sentencing guideline range from four to 10 months in prison, to 12 to 18 months.
http://citizensvoice.com/18-month-s...for-cash-financier-and-star-witness-1.1227829
Powell, the federal judge said, must serve 18 months in federal prison and pay $60,200 in fines. He must report to prison by Nov. 30.
Uggggggggh. Time for some fresh air.
 

lotek

Active Member


QFT!
 

Grieves

Senior Member
The thing that really sickens me about those sentences is that the only excuse I can see for not laying down the harshest possible punishment on these guys in a court of law is the precedent it would set in regard to how the rest of the industry is penalized for such crimes. It can only be about protecting larger examples. Law is very much about precedent, and setting the bar so laughably low facilitates future punishments for larger-scale instances of this sort of behavior being only slightly, incrementally more harsh. Atrocious stuff.
 

OddFuture

New Member


Florida inmates convicted of non-violent drug crimes spent 194 percent more time behind bars in 2009 than they did in 1990, costing the state billions of dollars but providing little public safety benefit, a new study found. The study, by the Pew Center on the States, examined trends in 35 states that provided data on incarceration for inmates convicted of violent crimes, property crimes and drug offenses. It found that nationally, state inmates across all categories of offenses served an average of nine additional months in custody, a rise of 36 percent since 1990. Florida led all states with an increase of 166 percent in time served for all prisoners. The rise in time served costs states an estimated $10 billion per year, the study found



"A private company that operates Idaho's largest prison acknowledged Thursday that its employees falsified nearly 4,800 hours of staffing records over seven months last year in violation of its contract with the state.

The admission by Nashville, Tenn.-based Corrections Corporation of America is the latest in a string of staffing problems alleged or being investigated at the Idaho Correctional Center south of Boise."*

For-profit, private prisons are marketed as a way for states to save money, but what about when they often go out of their way to support unnecessary imprisonment? What about when they're [often] proven to be corrupt? Now, Corrections Corporation of America has admitted to falsifying employee records to get more taxpayer money from states.
 

Oxymoron

Banned
Banned
People thrown into poverty by banksters actions are now fodder for making huge profits for private prisons by repeatedly being thrown into prison because they cannot afford to pay small fines.

I have to ask, what kind of system do you call that... what justice is there... what humanity is there?

If someone cannot afford to pay a fine... make them do community service instead or if they are put in prison, that should be the punishment in lieu of the fine.

It is ridiculous to fine someone who has not the means to pay. To incarcerate them and still expect them to pay on release is beyond comprehension. To add costs etc and increase the fine which they cannot pay due to poverty is simply perpetuating a vicious circle.

Who benefits... Well we all know that do we not.

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/04/05/1829601/ohio-debtors-prison/?mobile=nc
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/05/ohio-jailing-poor_n_3019636.html

 
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