The Voyages of Captain Cook

Abishua

Member
Coriolis is magic on a flat earth. How does INS work on the flat earth, equations are required. But the answer is always a Gish Gallop of fantasy.

How many hours does it take to fly around the fantasy flat earth antarctica, distance and time please.

captain Cooks ship logs suposedly indicate that he traveled arround 60 000 miles to circumnavigate antarctica.. don't know how much time a plane would need to cover that distance.. but time it took him to do it and miles crossed indicate he was not going arround a small iceberg..
 

Rory

Senior Member.
Captain Cook's ship logs supposedly indicate that he traveled around 60,000 miles to circumnavigate Antarctica. The time it took him to do it and miles crossed indicate he was not going around a small iceberg.
Oh dear - I surely thought this embarrassing old chestnut had long since been thrown by the wayside.

If you research his voyage properly you'll find that the 60,000-mile figure also includes his sailing to and from England, and a huge amount of diversion and exploration in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.
 

Inti

Senior Member.
captain Cooks ship logs suposedly indicate that he traveled arround 60 000 miles to circumnavigate antarctica.. don't know how much time a plane would need to cover that distance.. but time it took him to do it and miles crossed indicate he was not going arround a small iceberg..

Please stick to the subject and don't throw in ancient fallacies that date back to the 19th Century. You can see that route of Captain Cook here:



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cook

As you see, it was not a circle around the edge of Antarctica!

Now, back to the topic under discussion...
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
Oh dear - I surely thought this embarrassing old chestnut had long since been thrown by the wayside.

If you research his voyage properly you'll find that the 60,000-mile figure also includes his sailing to and from England, and a huge amount of diversion and exploration in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.
To expand on that point, here's a chart of Cooks voyages

Note the second voyage goes round the South Pacific twice, the third deviates North into the Arctic Ocean, and even the first isn't exactly a straight line as it zig zags across the Pacific.
 

Rory

Senior Member.
The claim flat earthers usually present - the 60,000-mile figure - is based on his three year-long second voyage, in which he did "go all the way around Antarctica".

But, yes, they neglect to include the first and final legs of the journey from and to the UK, as well as all the detouring.

When factored properly, there's nothing unusual about the mileage. Unless @Abishua can present evidence showing otherwise?
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
To expand on that point, here's a chart of Cooks voyages

Note the second voyage goes round the South Pacific twice, the third deviates North into the Arctic Ocean, and even the first isn't exactly a straight line as it zig zags across the Pacific.

Wow, all those islands out there and Capt Cook manages to end up on the Cook Islands. What are the odds? :D
 

Inti

Senior Member.
The claim flat earthers usually present - the 60,000-mile figure - is based on his three year-long second voyage, in which he did "go all the way around Antarctica".

But, yes, they neglect to include the first and final legs of the journey from and to the UK, as well as all the detouring.

When factored properly, there's nothing unusual about the mileage. Unless @Abishua can present evidence showing otherwise?
@Abishua, like many flat earth believers, has a huge problem with maps. In a private converstaion, I asked him:

@Abishua replied:

As I asked him,

Notice the wildly different standards of evidence that @Abishua applies to claims that he likes and those that he doesn't.
 

huwp

Member
captain Cooks ship logs suposedly indicate that he traveled arround 60 000 miles to circumnavigate antarctica.. don't know how much time a plane would need to cover that distance.. but time it took him to do it and miles crossed indicate he was not going arround a small iceberg..

Antarctica is nearly 14 million square kilometers of land surface area. That is roughly a quarter again larger than Europe, and about three-quarters the size of South America. Not a small iceberg.
 
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