The Global Cross-Hair Enigma that looks like Hair Dryer Burns

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
@Mick West i forget where that database you were looking at is in this thread. are these mark receivers generally women?
It's essentially this thread:
https://touraine-insolite.clicforum.fr/t987-tranges-traces-circulaires-cutan-es.htm

There's also some pdf files with more details - but because they contain some limited personal information, I can't share them. You'd have to request access.
https://drive.google.com/drive/fold...kVUJPME0?resourcekey=0-Sk3VDEHdAyK9Ud9YJtKhRQ

Mostly women, yes. Although I think that's more to do with hairdryer usage than pain tolerance.
Article:
About 92 percent of British women regularly use a hair dryer (according to the consultancy Mintel), while 75.5 percent of all women and 24.5 percent of men in the United States and 97 percent of women and 30 percent of men in Japan use one (according to Dyson), and most spend an average of 20 minutes on each session.


Not sure about France, probably similar to the UK, but no ratio there.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Day 2, small mark nearly invisible, just slightly raised skin. Large mark faded somewhat.
2022-08-07_08-16-35.jpg
I think the faintness is a little deceptive, as I've said before, if this were a geometric pattern, then it would be very apparent, even when faded.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
Mostly women, yes. Although I think that's more to do with hairdryer usage
i agree. but if they are mostly women then you've got a group that is maybe more dismissive of pain in this particular setting. ie. prettying up.

men/professional welders (for ex) get burned with welding molten stuff, and probably dont "notice" it as much after they burn themselves several times.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
if this were a geometric pattern, then it would be very apparent,
food coloring might work if you want to show this. youd have to be careful not to wash the straight line vs the circle design you draw. i would do it but i dont have food coloring on hand. i cant think of anything nontoxic that stains skin...hhhmmm.

if i use v8 juice on cloth...just so people see that a design shows more than a line. i'm gonna try that later.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
*waxing the upper lip is way more painful then a curling iron burn. esp the tinyist hairs right up against your nostrils. you guys wnt to experience "ouch", try that one.
Those of us with mustaches may have had something like that experience from time to time. You're right it hurts like a %^$#^&.

But while agreeing that the women I know tend to be more pain tolerant than I am, I will note that the only one here pressing hot blow driers aganist his arm in the name of skepticism is a guy. :D
 

LilWabbit

Senior Member
Those of us with mustaches may have had something like that experience from time to time. You're right it hurts like a %^$#^&.

But while agreeing that the women I know tend to be more pain tolerant than I am, I will note that the only one here pressing hot blow driers aganist his arm in the name of skepticism is a guy. :D

Technically not even our Sage of Skepticism has. He used a thermocouple.

Any MB member dare to be the first one to do a 'proper' hairdryer burn? (Didn't even know it's thing)
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
i used paint and put a cloth over my shoulder. unfortunately the only whitish clean cloth i have right now is thin linen so there's a pretty big bleed factor. and i dint really try to get the paint super even on my grill...but was only curious about different angles on my shoulder.
1659887930626.png 20220807_115258.jpg

v8 on linen bleeds a bit too much
1659888397778.png
 
Last edited:

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Any MB member dare to be the first one to do a 'proper' hairdryer burn? (Didn't even know it's thing)
If anyone does, I suggest using a meat thermometer placed right at the grill, and don't do it if over 80°C, 175°F unless you actually want to damage your skin. Even then be aware you are taking a risk. I did <0.5 seconds with a thermocouple, and got a mark that is lasting a few days.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Example of a faint mark that's noticeable because it's geometric.
2022-08-07_08-59-16.jpg

About half an hour ago I pressed the scalloped end of a flashlight into my arm firmly for about ten seconds. It left this typical indentation, like a sleep mark, of simply from resting against something. Individual segments of it would probably not be noticed, but since it's a circle it kind of leaps out.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
The outer ring probably would not be so hot as to contribute though.
definitely. but the last ring (at the base of the dome) didnt show on any of them even though i did try to press straight on. i'm pretty boney though...still even if i was plumper up there i think the result would be about the same, i just touched, didnt really press much. tried to mimic (super quickly) how i would move a hairdryer in real life.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member


This video shows two things. Firstly that the outer ring (that's part of the shell of the hairdryer) gets hot, but not hot enough to burn (temperature in F here).
2022-08-07_09-28-30.jpg
Secondly, I switch it off a few seconds in, and it remains at dangerous temperatures for well over a minute. 2022-08-07_09-27-40.jpg
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
yea but how long would tht take to fade naturally?

heres linen v8 juice after a quick rinse.the straight line (on right) is barely noticeable. i was very careful to actually do more rinse on the design side.
20220807_122513.jpg

add: switched direction of cloth in case sunlight was messing with color
1659890017859.png
 
Last edited:

deirdre

Senior Member.
just kidding.. but as i painted my grill pink look what i noticed
20220807_130034_HDR.jpg 1659891952879.png

only difference is i have the tiny circle in the very middle.
 

Ravi

Senior Member.
Technically not even our Sage of Skepticism has. He used a thermocouple.

Any MB member dare to be the first one to do a 'proper' hairdryer burn? (Didn't even know it's thing)

I could, but I don't have a hairdryer. :cool:

Anyway, I have a background in lampworking/glassblowing (now a hobby), and have had countless of finger burns, or burns on the arm. Either by hot glass, or a hot metal torch. It is in the end part of the job and you get used to it. Indeed the aftermath differs, depending on the temp of the burn. The burns are usually not that big of a deal.
torch.png
 

jarlrmai

Senior Member
People having burns and getting so many they don't recall them or getting so used to them they barely notice, is different to a regular person getting a rare burn from a hairdryer that is so light and unpainful at the time that it skips your mind a few days later when you later notice an odd mark.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
People having burns and getting so many they don't recall them or getting so used to them they barely notice, is different to a regular person getting a rare burn from a hairdryer that is so light and unpainful at the time that it skips your mind a few days later when you later notice an odd mark.

there are still a lot of doctors who think everything a woman tells him is "hysteria" or we're just making it up for attention.

Granted this is sometimes true, but luckily the medical world is starting to wake up to the fact that sometimes we're telling the truth.
 

jarlrmai

Senior Member
there are still a lot of doctors who think everything a woman tells him is "hysteria" or we're just making it up for attention.

Granted this is sometimes true, but luckily the medical world is starting to wake up to the fact that sometimes we're telling the truth.
Non sequitur?
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
Granted this is sometimes true, but luckily the medical world is starting to wake up to the fact that sometimes we're telling the truth.
so you're advocating that we believe these women when they say the marks were left by aliens?
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
so you're advocating that we believe these women when they say the marks were left by aliens?
no i'm advocating we believe the vast majority of them when they say they didn't burn themselves on purpose. and they don't remember burning themselves.
 

LilWabbit

Senior Member
no i'm advocating we believe the vast majority of them when they say they didn't burn themselves on purpose. and they don't remember burning themselves.

You're making this unnecessarily a gender issue. I wouldn't give a blind "majority" pass of truth-telling to men nor women who think aliens left Atlantean marks on their skins. Each claim should be studied separately to understand the psychology behind. But "telling the truth" doesn't cut it.
 

LilWabbit

Senior Member
actually, until we have evidence to the contrary i believe the young man who doesn't remember burning his stomach either.

But thanks for [ex.]plaining my wrong think to me.

There are shades of grey, there are multiple explanations. There's a difference between a gullible person thinking something imaginary happened to him/her and being a calculating liar. Both cases are forms of not telling the truth.

There's also a difference between burning oneself without remembering in retrospect how it happened, and it being just "an accident".

There are also pathological liars who suffer from major psychological issues but are not bad or sinister people.

But in all of the above, a claim of alien markings is not telling the truth and therefore we shouldn't just blindly believe "the majority" of claimants.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
But in all of the above, a claim of alien markings is not telling the truth and therefore we shouldn't just blindly believe "the majority" of claimants.
You're raising a strawman. The claim generally isn't that aliens made the marks — in fact, I don't remember any of the marked people explicitly making that claim. The most common claim by far is that they don't remember how the marks got there. By extension, they don't remember burning themselves on purpose, although we are getting into semantic quibbling if we want to argue if that means they claim they didn't burn themselves.

But believing someone went, they say they don't remember burning themselves is not the same as believing a claim of alien markings.

I found that believing a person thinks they are telling the truth is a useful default position, regardless of the claim. I don't think it's at all out of the question that the majority (i.e., more than half) of the people in these cases didn't remember burning themselves where they made the report. I don't think they are all 100% truthful, but I also can't currently identify a single case where you could definitively say the person is lying about not remembering getting burnt.
 

LilWabbit

Senior Member
But believing someone went, they say they don't remember burning themselves is not the same as believing a claim of alien markings.

Sure, but if the same person also (1) seeks some kind of emotional payoff from people thinking it is possibly an alien marking or, alternatively, (2) delusionally believes it's one, then the likelihood goes up that the person's claim of not remembering the burn is also suspect or delusional. The latter could be a case of sincerely not remembering, but how likely does such a double delusion account for the majority of cases?

In the case of (3) an accidental burn that's just been forgotten (not falling under 1 or 2), why would it end up on a UFO website/database? I dare answer as follows: Either it's, in fact, case 1 or 2, or then Jacques Vallee or his henchmen are using the photos/reports of unsuspecting people to advance their own alien narrative.

I found that believing a person thinks they are telling the truth is a useful default position, regardless of the claim.

If the psychological hypothesis of 'wanting to be noticed as special with an abduction narrative' is to be explored as a distinct possibility to explain at least some of the burn marks, we cannot assume 'majority thinks they're telling the truth' as the default position. It's precisely the prevalence of various psychological profiles that we would seek to find out by such an exploration, rather than starting off with entirely non-expert guesses.

I don't think it's at all out of the question that the majority (i.e., more than half) of the people in these cases didn't remember burning themselves where they made the report. I don't think they are all 100% truthful, but I also can't currently identify a single case where you could definitively say the person is lying about not remembering getting burnt.

You may be right, but you may also be wrong. It's hard to tell as amateur psychologists by just looking at the photos and the seemingly sincere way they report them whether or not lies are involved, because there are also so many different ways and types of lying.

Maybe the majority are well-meaning, but that doesn't mean we can safely make the default assumption that they're telling the truth about not remembering the burns.
 
Last edited:

Mendel

Senior Member.
You're raising a strawman. The claim generally isn't that aliens made the marks — in fact, I don't remember any of the marked people explicitly making that claim. The most common claim by far is that they don't remember how the marks got there.
So, which claims are we debunking in this thread, then?
a) 'I burned myself with hair dryer and forgot about it until I found the mark'
b) 'I found a weird mark that I can't explain, it must be aliens/supernatural'
with b) being partially implicit because of where it is being reported
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
So, which claims are we debunking in this thread, then?
a) 'I burned myself with hair dryer and forgot about it until I found the mark'
b) 'I found a weird mark that I can't explain, it must be aliens/supernatural'
with b) being partially implicit because of where it is being reported
Really I just set out to investigate this slide, and associated commentary:


The implication is that A) it's something other than a hairdryer burn, and B) it's related to a UFO sighting 9 months later. The claim is Vallee's. We don't know what the witness here claims about the link. She did not think she burnt herself and suspected the mark was related to meditation.

I think the investigation in this thread is sufficient to show this is a hairdryer burn and probably an accidental one she does not remember.
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
There's a difference between a gullible person thinking something imaginary happened [to him/her] and being a calculating liar. Both cases are forms of not telling the truth.
You do realize i am female, and until the end of time i am going to use this statement against you to claim you are not telling the truth. ;) silly rabbit.
 

LilWabbit

Senior Member
You do realize i am female, and until the end of time i am going to use this statement against you to claim you are not telling the truth. ;) silly rabbit.

Do you realize that under your definition of a female all lawyers are ladies. :cool:
 

Ann K

Senior Member.
You do realize i am female, and until the end of time i am going to use this statement against you to claim you are not telling the truth. ;) silly rabbit.
No, Dierdre, I think it really isn't helpful to try to pit men against women. This thread is about a phenomenon that affects largely women, simply because hairdryers are overwhelmingly used by women.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
The claim generally isn't that aliens made the marks — in fact, I don't remember any of the marked people explicitly making that claim.
I went back and looked again, and there are some references to aliens, often joking.

These are what I found when searching for "alien" on the translated PDFs.

  • It was suggested that it was was a stretch mark, and another joked that I was probably taken by aliens.
  • I show it to 2, 3 colleagues, they laugh at me say you were kidnapped by aliens.
  • I may have fallen asleep on top of a object of this shape (maybe help me find which one) the circle is just under 3 cm in diameter, and the inside maybe 2.5 cm) tell me if I am a victim of an alien abduction or a people from a lunar satellite. Thank you ;) It's not a problem
  • He doesn't use a hair dryer. The mark looked so gentle. We had joked the aliens gave him something to be smarter. He was seeming smarter but he already is. [about 9 year-old son]
  • I agree with you the hair dryer would be the logical answer but my daughter aged 28 months at the time told me about being abducted by aliens and traveling to other galaxies, an amazing testimony full of common sense for a child of this age
  • Hello, my friend had a “dream” 2 nights ago (23/3/20) about being abducted by aliens she said. She said they started doing something to her leg and she was in pain and was screaming. When she woke, she completely forgot about the dream until she was getting changed and noticed this marking on her thigh on her left leg.
  • Hello guys.....it’s been 1 year I’m trying to research about this mark...I got it one year ago, and there is no explaination for it . I hope we all together can find out if this is alien, or the government... these are the only two options that make sense to me. Because there is no other way that I could have got this strange mark like that... I would so prefer that is aliens who touched me and not humans...
Content from External Source
One that seems serious, quoted from their blog in 2012
Article:
Yes, I have been abducted by aliens. That's the true reason for my absence from the blogosphere of late. I had been lamenting my lack of inspiration for blog posts. Lapses of memory had me dazed and confused. Melancholy had set in and I was becoming careless in my daily ablutions. A sudden burning sensation brought me back to reality.

When all was said and done, it finally hit me... those lapses of memory were a result of an alien abduction. Who knows where I was taken or what experiments were imposed upon my person. Perhaps a study of the effects of too much Dr Pepper on humanoids. Or maybe it was a study in why a CatLady would have such an aversion to cats. We'll probably never know.

All I know for sure is that when it was over, I was left with a peculiar mark on my shoulder. An alien brand, if you will...2022-08-08_13-33-05.jpg
Scientists will probably spend years analyzing the scar and wondering what it might mean. Is it an alien compass or a calendar of some sort? Could it be a form of alien writing? Is it a diagram of a crop circle? Or, could they have implanted something in my shoulder? Perhaps a tracking device, or worse... a mind control device?


I wonder though if that's a language issue, as to me the post reads like she is joking.
 

FatPhil

Senior Member.
You do realize i am female, and until the end of time i am going to use this statement against you to claim you are not telling the truth. ;) silly rabbit.

"are not telling the truth" - a continuing action still taking place; or
"once did not tell the truth" - a completed action in the past
?
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
"are not telling the truth" - a continuing action still taking place; or
"once did not tell the truth" - a completed action in the past
?
huh? he hasnt thought the imaginary thing happened yet, so when i hold it against him it will be in the present tense.

i guess i can continue to hold that future thought against him repeatedly, in which case it will be a "did not tell the truth", after the initial "you are not telling the truth" but that sounds like too much work for a joke.
 

Latest posts

Top