Senate Resolution 221. Naturopathic Medicine Week. Bunk gets unanimous Senate vote.

solrey

Senior Member.
That Slate article itself is bunk. Chinese medicine is NOT a key component of naturopathic education. The article is attempting to demonize naturopathic medicine by equating it with Mao's totalitarian China, which is just total rubbish. It's good to have choices and personally I prefer changes in lifestyle and diet and scientifically proven herbal remedies over some automaton hack pushing pills with a hundred side effects.
 

scombrid

Senior Member.
I agree that the slate article is too hyperbolic. The Senate isn't up to some nefarious plot like MAO. It is just snowed. Perhaps I should remove the link to the Slate article since you are correct that TCM is not central to Naturopathy.

I will however maintain that Naturopathy is bunk because it contains much bunk including elements of TCM.

I prefer changes in lifestyle and diet and scientifically proven herbal remedies over some automaton hack pushing pills with a hundred side effects.
So do I. If only that is all that naturopathy was about.

I've yet to run across a naturopath that just advocated good diet and avoidance of stress. Naturopathy is rife with TCM, Homeopathy, untested herbal supplements, etc...

Does Wikipedia need correcting?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naturopathy

Methods
The particular modalities used by an individual naturopath varies with training and scope of practice. The demonstrated efficacy and scientific rationale also varies. These include: Acupuncture, applied kinesiology,[32] botanical medicine, brainwave entrainment, chelation therapy for atherosclerosis,[33] colonic enemas,[15] color therapy,[32] cranial osteopathy,[30] hair analysis,[30] homeopathy,[34] iridology,[32] live blood analysis, nature cures—i.e. a range of therapies based upon exposure to natural elements such as sunshine, fresh air, heat, or cold, nutrition (examples include vegetarian and wholefood diet, fasting, and abstention from alcohol and sugar,[35] ozone therapy,[2] physical medicine (e.g., naturopathic, osseous, and soft tissue manipulative therapy, sports medicine, exercise, and hydrotherapy), Psychological counseling (e.g., meditation, relaxation, and other methods of stress management[35]), public health measures and hygiene,[24] reflexology,[32] rolfing,[18] and traditional Chinese medicine.

A 2004 survey determined the most commonly prescribed naturopathic therapeutics in Washington State and Connecticut were botanical medicines, vitamins, minerals, homeopathy, and allergy treatments.[34]

Vaccination
See also: Vaccination and Vaccine controversies
Many forms of alternative medicine, including naturopathy, homeopathy, and chiropractic are based on beliefs opposed to vaccination and have practitioners who voice their opposition. This includes non-medically trained naturopaths. The reasons for this negative vaccination view are complicated and rest, at least in part, on the early views which shape the foundation of these professions.[36] A survey of a cross section of students of a major complementary and alternative medicine college in Canada reported that students in the later years of the program opposed vaccination more strongly than newer students.[37]

A University of Washington study investigated insurance claim histories for alternative medicine use in relation to the receipt of vaccinations against preventable illnesses, grouped into children aged 1–2 years and 1–17 years. Both groups were significantly less likely to receive a number of their vaccinations if they visited a naturopath. The study found a significant association between visits to naturopaths with a reduced receipt of pediatric vaccinations and with increased infection by vaccine-preventable diseases.[29]
Naturopathy is apparently quite broad and includes a lot of bunk. As such, it should not be broadly promoted unless useful prectices are specified and bunk such as homeopathy and such specifically rejected. Otherwise the bunk parts recieve an undue endorsement.
 
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ShanBurford

New Member
That Slate article itself is bunk. Chinese medicine is NOT a key component of naturopathic education. The article is attempting to demonize naturopathic medicine by equating it with Mao's totalitarian China, which is just total rubbish. It's good to have choices and personally I prefer changes in lifestyle and diet and scientifically proven herbal remedies over some automaton hack pushing pills with a hundred side effects.
Thanks for the information !
 
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