"Pyramid" UFO's in Night Vision Footage - Maybe Bokeh?

MclachlanM

Active Member
I think they would've seen aircraft lights and stars with their eyes. I wouldn't expect NVG to see through clouds.

NVG do have limitations. SRT’s Gadbois explained that pilots need to learn how to avoid flying into IMC while wearing goggles. “If you haven’t been trained properly on what to look for,” he said, “you can get into weather you probably wouldn’t have got into [without NVG].” The problem is that with NVG, it is possible to see through some forms of clouds, so the pilot might not notice that conditions have deteriorated. “If you see wisps, you’re probably in the clouds,” he said. “If you’re new to goggles, you don’t catch that right away.”
https://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/2013-03-04/nvg-essential-tool-helo-pilots
 

MetaMe

New Member
Why do they need night vision to see blinking airplanes and stars? They didn't try looking without night vision?
Do we have comments from whoever took this video?
I would imagine the person who took the video didn't think anything of it, and it's probably been picked up by someone else who wasn't there sifting through random recorded videos.

Corbell is the one who released it with the alien connotation.
 

metabuster

New Member
I think they would've seen aircraft lights and stars with their eyes. I wouldn't expect NVG to see through clouds.
It isn't about seeing through clouds though. The night is dark because there are few photons reaching our eyes after being emitted/reflected by our surroundings. Clouds will diffuse photons which cause fewer to reach the sensor, but working with fewer photons (amplifying that signal) is exactly what nvg do.
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
I'm going to go with "Hey, we're getting those weird radar returns like we got when we saw those drones yesterday, somebody go outside and look. Take the night vision stuff. And look at everything just to be sure, even if it is just a star or a plane or something."
 

Amber Robot

Active Member
I'm going to go with "Hey, we're getting those weird radar returns like we got when we saw those drones yesterday, somebody go outside and look. Take the night vision stuff. And look at everything just to be sure, even if it is just a star or a plane or something."
“And don’t bother focusing or anything…”
 

JMartJr

Senior Member
We don't know if there was footage taken in focus -- but is there was there would be little point in leaking video of an airplane nicely in focus to the UFO enthusiasts.
 

Jesse3959

Member
@Agent K @metabuster

So yes, the light hits the photo-emissive screen which then emits electrons - the more light the more electrons.

In the gen1 NVD, those electrons were accelerated towards a phosphor target where they then produced light.

However in Gen2 and Gen3, the electrons actually first travel down inside tiny quartz tubes called micro channels (again in a high voltage electric field) and as they accelerate they strike the wall of the quartz tube which allows one electron to then produce a bunch more free electrons, all of which accelerate and strike the wall of the quartz tube and again each produce a bunch more -- so there's this exponential gain in electrons just like a photo-multiplier tube. These are then accelerated towards a phosphor screen and converted to a visible image.

So does NVD allow us to see things we could not see with the naked eye? YES.

And this happens in two ways - first, they are sensitive to infrared. So an infrared light -- or the infrared portion of a light which travels more freely through a haze -- can be seen through NVD when not with the visible eye.

Secondly, they multiple the light thousands of times I suppose - which in and of itself allows you to see things which are just too dim to see with the naked eye.

As to personal anecdotes, I've seen cases where an airplane flying a long ways away may be hardly noticable with the naked eye, but is highly visible with NVD.
 

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