Odigo Says Two Workers In Israel Received Message Predicting Some Attack Hrs Before 9/11

Alchemist

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Odigo says workers were warned of attack

Haaretz (Israel's oldest daily newspaper)
http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/news/odigo-says-workers-were-warned-of-attack-1.70579
Odigo, the instant messaging service, says that two of its workers received messages two hours before the Twin Towers attack on September 11 predicting the attack would happen, and the company has been cooperating with Israeli and American law enforcement, including the FBI, in trying to find the original sender of the message predicting the attack.

Odigo, the instant messaging service, says that two of its workers received messages two hours before the Twin Towers attack on September 11 predicting the attack would happen, and the company has been cooperating with Israeli and American law enforcement, including the FBI, in trying to find the original sender of the message predicting the attack.

Micha Macover, CEO of the company, said the two workers received the messages and immediately after the terror attack informed the company's management, which immediately contacted the Israeli security services, which brought in the FBI.

"I have no idea why the message was sent to these two workers, who don't know the sender. It may just have been someone who was joking and turned out they accidentally got it right. And I don't know if our information was useful in any of the arrests the FBI has made," said Macover. Odigo is a U.S.-based company whose headquarters are in New York, with offices in Herzliya.

As an instant messaging service, Odigo users are not limited to sending messages only to people on their "buddy" list, as is the case with ICQ, the other well-known Israeli instant messaging application.

Odigo usually zealously protects the privacy of its registered users, said Macover, but in this case the company took the initiative to provide the law enforcement services with the originating Internet Presence address of the message, so the FBI could track down the Internet Service Provider, and the actual sender of the original message.

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mynym

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Old news... and like Sibel Edmonds found, those types of "investigations" always stop somewhere up the chain of command when the military industrial complexes of the world are incorporated in an event.

Interesting comment from an apparent Israeli peasant there:
Israeli and US governments
  • By Moshe
  • 30 Jul 2013
  • 00:30AM
Tbe Israeli and US governments were complicit in these criminal demolitions of 2001.
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The fact that they can see it says something, given the sort of ethnocracy they live in and the ideology of tribal supremacy that they're often taught too. Kind of interesting that many American nationalists and "exceptionalists" can't see the same thing, as one would think that their tribal instincts shouldn't be as strong in the "melting pot."

This article is old news, though... so how did the FBI's investigation into that go? I wonder what translators they used or if the more patriotic agents trying to do their jobs were able to get accurate translations for their "investigation." Because that seems to be a problem sometimes. And then even if they did get an accurate translation from multinationals or dual citizens and so forth, their investigation into 911 would still be stopped farther up the chain of command somewhere... if history is any measure.
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Out of millions of text messages in the world that day, there was one that mentioned some unspecified attack, somewhere in the US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odigo_Messenger
Odigo reported that, two hours before the September 11, 2001 attacks, two of their employees who were working in an Odigo office in Herzliya Pituah, a city near Tel Aviv,[1] received a hostile English electronic instant message non-specifically threatening them that a terrorist attack would happen.[2] They did not mention this to their employer until after they heard reports of a terrorist attack in the United States on the news, after which they informed the company's management. One of Odigo's New York offices was then situated under a kilometer away from the World Trade Center complex.[3] However, the threatening message did not mention the location of an attack.[4] The company took the initiative in tracking down the originating IP address of the message, giving the information to the FBI, so that the FBI could track down the Internet Service Provider, and the actual sender of the original message.[5] Using the "people-search" function, Odigo users can send anonymous messages anywhere in the world to other users, who they can find based on demographics or location. According to the Washington Post, the message declared “that some sort of attack was about to take place. The notes ended with an anti-Semitic slur. The messages said 'something big was going to happen in a certain amount of time'".[6]
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So? What more is there to add? What exactly is the issue here?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I've clarified your headline, which gave the misleading impression that all their workers were warned, and possibly workers in the WTC.
 

Josh Heuer

Active Member
This is exactly the kind of thing that gets misinterpreted and ends up fueling the conspiracy fire.

The fact that it was, as Mick pointed out, non-specific should immediately be a cue that it most likely was just a simple coincidence, bound to happen within millions of texts. I bet the majority of people took it as being directly about the terrorist attacks in NYC.
 

Alchemist

Banned
Banned
Out of millions of text messages in the world that day, there was one that mentioned some unspecified attack, somewhere in the US.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Odigo_Messenger
Odigo reported that, two hours before the September 11, 2001 attacks, two of their employees who were working in an Odigo office in Herzliya Pituah, a city near Tel Aviv,[1] received a hostile English electronic instant message non-specifically threatening them that a terrorist attack would happen.[2] They did not mention this to their employer until after they heard reports of a terrorist attack in the United States on the news, after which they informed the company's management. One of Odigo's New York offices was then situated under a kilometer away from the World Trade Center complex.[3] However, the threatening message did not mention the location of an attack.[4] The company took the initiative in tracking down the originating IP address of the message, giving the information to the FBI, so that the FBI could track down the Internet Service Provider, and the actual sender of the original message.[5] Using the "people-search" function, Odigo users can send anonymous messages anywhere in the world to other users, who they can find based on demographics or location. According to the Washington Post, the message declared “that some sort of attack was about to take place. The notes ended with an anti-Semitic slur. The messages said 'something big was going to happen in a certain amount of time'".[6]
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So? What more is there to add? What exactly is the issue here?

I can bold and emphasize too.

Haaretz (Israel's oldest newspaper):
Odigo, the instant messaging service, says that two of its workers received messages two hours before the Twin Towers attack on September 11 predicting the attack would happen, and the company has been cooperating with Israeli and American law enforcement, including the FBI, in trying to find the original sender of the message predicting the attack.
Content from External Source
Washington Post (US outlet)
According to the Washington Post, the message declared “that some sort of attack was about to take place. The notes ended with an anti-Semitic slur. The messages said 'something big was going to happen in a certain amount of time'".
Content from External Source
Which of these two sources is more reputable given that the workers in Israel received the messages?
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
So we don't know what was in the messages then. Sources agree that some "attack" was mention. They disagree on if it was specifically the attacks that subsequently happened.

FOIA time?
 
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