Linear Clouds in Old Painting

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member

Soda Springs, Sierra Nevada Mountains. Norton Bush 1868

In a visit to the wonderful Crocker Museum in Sacramento I saw a couple of paintings,both over 100 years old that had linear clouds in them. The type of clouds that might be mistaken for contrails or "chemtrails".


Crests of the Sierra, Charles Dormon Robinson, 1909 (detail)

Old paintings like these are useful in demonstrating that the sky has not in fact changed recently, and also that not every linear cloud you see is a contrail (or a "chemtrail").

I just took the above photos with my iPhone. If you happen to see similar in an art gallery or museum, then take a snap, and post it here.
 

Henk001

Active Member
Old paintings like these are useful in demonstrating that the sky has not in fact changed recently, and also that not every linear cloud you see is a contrail (or a "chemtrail").
Or perhaps these paintings show that in earlier times aliens were flying around in jetplanes.:)
 

Whitebeard

Senior Member
Wow you guys got out to your local art galleries quick!
Going to my local gallery next week, the one I posted are from a few collections I'm familiar with (Done the Birmingham City Gallery and the Tate Britain so far) from their on line collections.
 

Trailspotter

Senior Member
Wow you guys got out to your local art galleries quick!
No, I've been browsing online catalogues of Russian galleries, in particular, the Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow.

Linear clouds in this 1852 painting of the Smolny Convent near St. Petersburg apparently form a 'contrail' grid ;)


Here is a 1850 painting of St. Petersburg by the same artist, Alexey Bogolyubov:


Apparently, linear non-contrail clouds were fairly common at the Baltic Sea at the time, as they are now.
 
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M Bornong

Senior Member

I also posted this in the Pre 1995 Persistent Contrail Archive. https://www.metabunk.org/pre-1995-persistent-contrail-archive.t487/page-5#post-71179

I took this from the book: "The Soul of All Scenery: A History of the Sky in Art" by Stan Gedzleman. http://www.sci.ccny.cuny.edu/~stan/skyart.html

With more than just cirrus clouds now being used as "proof" of geoengineering and or HAARP manipulation, I have used this book many times to show how little our skies have changed over the centuries that man has been recording them.
 

cloudspotter

Senior Member
Well I did go to a museum. :p Unfortunately my photos didn't come out well thanks to lighting and glare. :(

Here's one I tried to photograph. Solitude by John Martin 1846

 
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