Laser attacks on airplanes continue

Jay Reynolds

Senior Member.
This week's attack in Palm Beach resulted in some damage to the pilot's eyes:
http://www.wptv.com/dpp/news/region...ernational-airport-says-it-damaged-his-vision
========================================================
Regina, Saskachewan, Canada. Pop: 179,000
2011- one attack, 2012- five attacks, 2013- 12 attacks
http://www.leaderpost.com/news/Lase...a+Regina+Airport+Authority/9274627/story.html
Most local laser incidents were reported over the northwest part of the city, he added.

All types of aircraft — from “the flying club to airliners” — have been targeted.

Hunter said that pointing a laser into the cockpit of an aircraft in flight could bring the offender a fine of up to $100,000 under the federal government’s Aeronautics Act or up to five years in jail.

The airport authority and the Regina Police Service ask that any such laser incidents be reported immediately to the Regina Police

Service at 306-777-6500.

There is more information on the issue and its potential dangers at www.tc.gc.ca/lasers

Said Hunter: “We don’t want anyone to go to jail or pay a fine — but just to stop.”
 

JRBids

Senior Member.
Are these shined into the cockpit as they are landing? It seems that the angle would be too steep otherwise.
 

Jay Reynolds

Senior Member.
Jury Convicts Couple For Shining Laser At Fresno Police Helicopter
By Newsroom America Staff at 22 Dec 10:39

(Newsroom America) -- After a three–day trial, a federal jury has found Sergio Patrick Rodriguez, 25, and Jennifer Lorraine Coleman, 23, residents of Clovis, California, guilty today of aiming a laser pointer at a Fresno Police helicopter, Air One, and, as to Rodriguez, attempting to interfere with the operation of Air One.

According to evidence presented at trial, Rodriguez and Coleman used a high-powered green laser pointer to repeatedly strike the cockpit of Air One during a clear summer night last year.
More:
http://www.newsroomamerica.com/stor...ining_laser_at_fresno_police_helicopter_.html

===========================================================
New warning over laser attacks on planes
A commercial airline pilot has issued a warning over “brainless” laser attacks after his plane was targeted during an approach to Newcastle Airport
The pilot – who asked not to be named – spoke out after the incident last Wednesday, which occurring during heavy rain and strong winds.

“The weather was atrocious, with strong turbulence and crosswinds outside of the legal limits for my first officer,” he told the Evening Chronicle. “The aircraft was being battered by the gales and the landing conditions at the airport… required total concentration from the flight crews, and in particular, myself as the captain landing the aircraft with a large number of passengers inbound from the Mediterranean."

He said he felt a searing pain in his left eye and turned to see a bright green last coming from the area around Kingston Park

more:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/travelnews/10534696/New-warning-over-laser-attacks-on-planes.html
 

WeedWhacker

Senior Member
GOVERNMENT SOLAR POWER ATTACKS AS WELL ?
Airplane pilots cruising over southern California have been complaining about a “nearly blinding” glare emanating from a massive government-funded solar thermal facility.

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2014/03/18/a...m-massive-calif-solar-facility/#ixzz2wNJJ6TMN
Content from External Source

I do believe I've read a thread on this somewhere....ah, here it is:

http://flightaware.com/squawks/view... Power Plant a Risk to Air Safety, Say Pilots
 

JFDee

Senior Member.
... solar thermal facility ...

It may be of interest that there is a significant difference between the Ivanpah thermal facility that you refer to and conventional photo-voltaic facilities.

The former operates with mirrors (designed for maximum reflection), the latter uses panels that directly convert light into electric current. They are not optimized for reflection.

The important point is that PV panels are usually adjusted to face the sun, whereas the thermal mirrors are adjusted to reflect the light to a central point on the ground.

So once the thermal facility is operational, it's mirrors will reflect the sunlight away from the sky.
It is very likely that the reported glare was caused by misadjusted / nonoperational mirrors.

In comparison, PV panels are much more prone to cause reflection glare (directed to the sun's position), though with less intensity than mirrors.

Regarding the public funding: the project received a loan through the Department of Energy which is to be paid back with interest.

http://ivanpahsolar.com/
 

M Bornong

Senior Member.
It may be of interest that there is a significant difference between the Ivanpah thermal facility that you refer to and conventional photo-voltaic facilities.

The former operates with mirrors (designed for maximum reflection), the latter uses panels that directly convert light into electric current. They are not optimized for reflection.

The important point is that PV panels are usually adjusted to face the sun, whereas the thermal mirrors are adjusted to reflect the light to a central point on the ground.

So once the thermal facility is operational, it's mirrors will reflect the sunlight away from the sky.
It is very likely that the reported glare was caused by misadjusted / nonoperational mirrors.

In comparison, PV panels are much more prone to cause reflection glare (directed to the sun's position), though with less intensity than mirrors.

Regarding the public funding: the project received a loan through the Department of Energy which is to be paid back with interest.

http://ivanpahsolar.com/
DSCF0055.jpg
This is what the Ivanpah Array looked like from our plane at 8:45 am on March 20, 2014.
 

Critical Thinker

Senior Member.
When there are numerous hits across the country in a short period of time as covered in the news recently it begs the question whether these are totally random or are there people that encourage this kind of idiocy.

Here is the news article about the recent spate of laser strikes:


Laser strikes on aircraft hit record pace
Bart Jansen, USA TODAY4:45 p.m. EST November 12, 2015

Laser strikes on planes are growing even as the federal government enacts tougher penalties for people caught shining the devices.

From Wednesday night through Thursday morning, federal authorities fielded reports of 20 laser strikes on aircraft, adding to an already record-breaking number of strikes this year.

The Federal Aviation Administration recorded 5,352 laser strikes through Oct. 16, up from 2,837 for all of 2010. Such strikes can temporarily blind pilots at critical times when they are taking off and landing. People convicted of pointing a laser at a plane can be sentenced to 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

Pilots and airports reported three laser strikes in the New York City area to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Jet crews landing at Dallas Love Field reported another three. Other airports reporting strikes included Jamestown, N.Y.; Los Angeles, Oakland, Sacramento, Palm Springs and Ontario, Calif.; Covington and Danville, Ky.; Salt Lake City; Albuquerque; Detroit; St. Petersburg, Fla., Springfield, Ill., and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Content from External Source
Doing a quick search I found one chemtrail conspiracy advocate who encourages that very action and it leaves me wondering about others who also incite that activity.

presstv link


FBI: Laser attacks on US planes rising
Thu Feb 13, 2014 2:16PM

eebe2332283722dbdeb98449bf447cb5.jpg
Nearly 4000 laser attacks annoyed, injured US pilots last year.
Laser technology has made the tiny beams of concentrated light available to anyone cheaply, sometimes even via your local drugstore. It has also led to a dangerous rise in people pointing them at airplanes, which can temporarily blind a pilot and put the hundreds of people on board at risk, the FBI said Tuesday.


As a result, federal officials are now offering up to a $10,000 reward as part of a pilot program in 12 FBI field offices for tips that lead to the arrest of any individual who aims a laser at an aircraft.


“Aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft is a serious matter and a violation of federal law,” said Ron Hosko, assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division, in a press release. “It is important that people understand that this is a criminal act with potentially deadly repercussions.”


The FAA said there has been a 1,100 percent increase in the deliberate targeting of aircraft by people with handheld lasers since they began keeping track of the incidents in 2005. In 2013, there were a total of 3,960 laser strikes reported, an average of almost 11 incidents per day.


“The risk associated with illegal and inappropriate laser illuminations is unacceptable. Pointing lasers at aircraft in flight poses a serious safety risk to the traveling public,” said Air Line Pilots Association International President Captain Lee Moak.


FBI field offices participating in the regional reward program are Albuquerque, Chicago, Cleveland, Houston, Los Angeles, New York City, Philadelphia, Phoenix, Sacramento, San Antonio, San Juan, and the Washington Field Office. CBS News


Comments



Joe
Feb 15, 2014 12:56 AM
Here's a great idea, let's start attacking the chemtrail planes with these lasers!!!
Like 1 | Dislike 0 | Reply
Content from External Source
 
Last edited:

Whitebeard

Senior Member.
This is an old post (2004), but still shows the mindset of some.
http://www.chemtrailcentral.com/forum/msg81090.html
I realize that this may be off topic as far as chemtrails are concerned but since we're talking about shining lights at planes I have some points to make. I too am a pilot and though I don't necessarily condone shining lights at aircraft I would have to agree with Louis. The danger in shining a light at an aircraft has been over-exaggerated here. If you look at what is being said logic would dictate that there is no threat. Whether it's a 1 or 2 million candle watt (How would you know the power of her light anyway?) power light you can't seriously believe that this will blind or hinder a pilot in an aircraft at what probably was several thousands of feet unless the pilot is looking directly into Savysandra's light, while traveling at hundereds of miles per hour, this is highly unlikely. If her light would be such a threat then the searchlights that they used in WWII would have been bringing down aircraft left and right and the searchlights used today to announce special events would have to be banned. The laws of physics state that the intesity of light decreases inversely proportional to square of the distance and this is in a theoretical system. Meaning intensity drops much faster than in a linear relationship. When you add particulate matter such as aerosols, dust, etc... which will in turn deflect the light further there's no way that you can expect that 2 million candlewatts of light would reach a pilot at cruising altitude from a hand held flashlight. Furthermore, what kind of trajectory are we looking at? If she's shining the light from underneath the aircraft, how is the light reaching the cockpit? I'm assuming that this would be the only way she would be able to see the falling debris because if the aircraft would be far enough away for her to be able to shine the light into the cockpit then the residue would not be falling on top of her.

This brings me to my last point. I've hear about people being arrested for pointing laser lights in the cockpit of aircraft, I believe that even in one case they managed to damage the vision of the pilot. This report came from our wonderful news media. Can someone explain to me who these people are and how they manage to accomplish this. I'm assuming that this is being done from the ground. Where are these people standing so that they are being identified? If they're around an airport, are they that stupid to think that no one will see what they are doing. If they hiding how is it that people are able to identify who is doing this. Furthermore, here's the problem

!) Target (Pilot in aircraft.) is a moving object lets say 400 - 500 miles/hr.
2) Most of the off the shelf laser pointers have a range of 300 yards if my math is correct that's 300*3=900 feet. At 900 feet the aircraft would be taking off or landing.
3) If we are to assume that the aircraft is landing or taking off (unless while still on the runway) this is even more problematic since the aircraft is in a nose high angle of attack making it harder to point anything into the cockpit.
4) The laser passing through the windshield will be refracted by the glass due to the refractory index of the glass and the angle of the windshield.
5) The actual target, using a generous amount, would be the opening of the eye between the eyelids which is about 1inch square. However, the damage to the eye is seen when the light enters through the pupil and hits the retina. Any idea how small this is? Are you starting to see my dilema in understanding how this works?

My point is these people who are doing this must be better than any sniper that I know of, to be able to target an object 100s if not 1000s of feet away which is moving upwards of 300 Miles/Hr., through an angled window, possibly through sunglasses, to thread the light through someones pupil, to damage their eyesight and I'm not even considering the fact that most people don't keep their eyes, head or body perfectly still, especially when you're a pilot looking around for traffic and looking at your instruments.
Who are these people? I think the military needs to hire these guys on as snipers.
Content from External Source
and all replies have the following...

DELETED DUE TO THE POLICY OF CTC IN LETTING THE DEBUNKERS OVERRUN THE SITE.
Content from External Source
 

CeruleanBlu

Senior Member.
The latest update to this ongoing trend is coming to light in a recent article:


A British Airways pilot has reportedly been left with significant damage to his eyesight after a “military-strength” laser was shone into the cockpit of his plane landing at Heathrow, in what appears to be the most serious laser attack to date in the UK.

The pilot suffered a burned retina in his right eye and has not worked since, according to the head of the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa).

The incident has escalated concerns over the problem of laser attacks. Balpa claims that one in two pilots has been in a plane targeted with lasers in the last 12 months....

...
According to figures compiled by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA), the number of reports of laser incidents in the UK has remained relatively constant at about four to five a day on average over the last four years.

But McAuslan said that in a poll conducted for Balpa, half of all the pilots in his union had reported a laser attack in the last 12 months...
Content from External Source
also


More than 400 incidents were reported in the UK in the first six months of this year, according to the CAA, with the highest number of incidents around Heathrow – although in proportion to air traffic, regional airports including Birmingham, Leeds Bradford, Newcastle and East Midlands have a far higher frequency.

In the US, the Federal Aviation Administration said the number of incidents had grown steadily since it started collating information on laser attacks in 2005. More than 3,700 incidents have been reported in the US this year.
Content from External Source
Source:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/20...military-laser-shone-into-cockpit-at-heathrow
 
Top