Interesting Contrails create five crosses in the Atlantic

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I think it's basically showing five flight paths. Draw a line connecting the X's of the five sets of paths, along that line there is no N/S wind movement. To the east of the line the wind blows north, and to the west it blows south.

Given the displacements shown you could generate a vector field that would give consistent results like this. Still rather unusual.
 

firepilot

Senior Member.
Actually, if you look at a chart of North Atlantic flight tracks, you will see how these could be made. Look at that line off shore of North America, where you have all those points where aircraft go to on their flight plans, and then start out across the Atlantic, or where they arrive at and leave the oceanic part of their flight as they go towards their destination.

North-Atlantic.gif
 

Trailspotter

Senior Member.
It seems to me that both explanations are correct. The planes appear to enter/leave the North American airspace at the fixed grid points. The directions of young contrails do correspond to the direction of flights between the States and Europe, whereas the directions of old contrails do not. There had to be a 180° change of the direction of wind between the east and west ends of the contrails. It is in agreement with the weather fronts in the area on the date:
http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/...efl1_143.A2012147143000-2012147143500.2km.jpg
and
http://rapidfire.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/...efl2_143.A2012147161500-2012147162000.2km.jpg
 

TWCobra

Senior Member.
So why would we be chemtrailing the North Atlantic?... Is the Azores getting a little uppity?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Interstingly I've been doing some renderings of flight paths, and they actuall show that no strange wind patterns are needed for this. It's simply how they fly. Somewhat randomly across the atlantic, and then direct for those nav points and beyond:

 
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PCWilliams

Senior Member.
Interstingly I've been doing some renderings of flight paths, and they actuall show that no strange wind patterns are needed for this. It's simply how they fly. Somewhat randomly across the atlantic, and then direct for those nav points and beyond:


Those look like "AR" routes (also called Oceanic Routes or Atlantic Routes) as we used to call them. They're designed parallel to each other, flying waypoint to waypoint.
 
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