Free energy inventions

somnamblst

Member
I see a lot of conspiracy theorists talking about free energy lately. As proof,the following was posted.

http://www.libertariannews.org/2013...-capable-of-powering-two-average-size-houses/

Two Brazilian inventors, Nilson Barbosa and Cleriston Leal, claim to have invented a free energy device and are now selling this device to the public. The device is called the Earth Electron Captor Generator, or “GERADOR CAPTOR DE ELÉTRONS DA TERRA” in Portuguese.

There is one catch, they are presently only offering the device to people who live in the city of Imperatriz. However, they are working to license production with several manufacturing firms that will allow for online sales. Their website says they will update their page with distributor information when it becomes available. The rumor mill says global distributors will come online in January of 2014.

The device requires a small amount of initial input power to start some kind of sensor rolling, which then produces over-unity power. The device looks small, which means it could be used for vehicular power, as well as residential power. They advertise it can be used in either roll, as well as an industrial power source. The site claims the input power needed to run it is around 2% of its output power.

They have several sizes of the generator. The smallest prototype they built is capable of generating 12.1 kw of power, with a load of 6000 watts, using only 21 watts input energy. The prototype unit weighs 1.5 kg measuring 20x30x15 cm. The average home needs around 15 kw of power.
 

WeedWhacker

Senior Member
Have you seen this one yet?

I commend this inventor, but it isn't really "free" energy. I suppose some engineers might imagine a similar (and much larger-scale) method to utilize what is known.....the power of water, due to its weight and gravity...and the energy that has already been "added to it" from nature, and geometry and find a way to extract this energy.

But, I think it's been thought of before, and simply doesn't give a "return" on investment. Unlike, say a hydro-electric dam, for instance.
 

Jason

Senior Member
I commend this inventor, but it isn't really "free" energy. I suppose some engineers might imagine a similar (and much larger-scale) method to utilize what is known.....the power of water, due to its weight and gravity...and the energy that has already been "added to it" from nature, and geometry and find a way to extract this energy.

But, I think it's been thought of before, and simply doesn't give a "return" on investment. Unlike, say a hydro-electric dam, for instance.
The use of water and gravity has yielded many accurate and exquisite time pieces throughout human history. Could water clocks be considered PM, or if designed differently could they potentially yield energy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_clock
 

WeedWhacker

Senior Member
Could water clocks be considered PM

No. (Assuming you used the abbreviation 'PM' to mean "Perpetual Motion"?). I have seen numerous documentaries about ingenious methods of keeping time, including using water. But, these inventions don't really comply with this thread's topic.

However, just before we get back to the subject (after this short interlude), there is this amazing thing that pre-dates the "modern" (Industrial Revolution-era) concept of the steam engine....the Greek "aeolipile" (pronounced, "Ay-ee-o-PEE-lay"):

http://www.ancient-origins.net/anci...invention-steam-engine-hero-alexandria-001467

What very few people know, thanks to the omission of important facts from our history books, is that Heron was the first inventor of the steam engine, a steam powered device that was called aeolipile or the ‘Heron engine’. The name comes from the greek word ‘Aiolos’ who was the Greek God of the winds. Although a few others have talked about devices similar to aeolipiles before Heron, Heron was the first one to describe them in detail and give instructions for manufacturing them in his book Pneumatica, where more than 78 devices are described. Many of Heron’s ideas were extensions and improvements of another Greek inventor who lived in Alexandria 300 years before him, known as Ktesibios, the first to write about the science of compressed air. - See more at: http://www.ancient-origins.net/anci...e-hero-alexandria-001467#sthash.VEf7jO39.dpuf
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It is interesting to consider that this device was thought as a sort of "amusement"...no-one (at the time) considered using this method of energy extraction (steam power) as a way to operate machines. Imagine what could have been accomplished!!
 

Hevach

Senior Member.
I commend this inventor, but it isn't really "free" energy. I suppose some engineers might imagine a similar (and much larger-scale) method to utilize what is known.....the power of water, due to its weight and gravity...and the energy that has already been "added to it" from nature, and geometry and find a way to extract this energy.

But, I think it's been thought of before, and simply doesn't give a "return" on investment. Unlike, say a hydro-electric dam, for instance.

There are actual generators like this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wave_power#List_of_devices

Most of them are pretty small, only a few are over a megawatt. Most are either demonstration or used to power some nearby device like navigation lights. There are a couple commercial grid-connected generators, though, like the Pelamis Wave Converters in Scottland.

You're almost always further ahead building tidal generators in the same area if you're trying to set up a fixed operation, but since these are portable, a lot of companies see merit in them for emergency needs - they could be easily shipped and set up in temporary locations like disaster zones or to provide temporary power if a plant is offline for some reason.

The use of water and gravity has yielded many accurate and exquisite time pieces throughout human history. Could water clocks be considered PM, or if designed differently could they potentially yield energy. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_clock
You can harvest energy from a water clock. If it's a drain type of clock, you can put a turbine in the outflow. If it's the sinking cup type, you can put a turbine in the cup.

However, with the former, you need to lift the water into the device, and in the later, you need to lift the full cups out of the water. At perfect efficiency, you'll use up all the energy you gain keeping the system running. This is why you can certainly put a generator under a water fall, but you can't pump it back up to the top of the fall to run it through again.
 
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