Debunking Humor...

Pareidolia? That's what "they" want you to think. Four people, a llama, and one hesitates to guess what that pink item might be...
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The thread US forensic scientist Dr John McDowell says the small Nazca mummies are NOT REAL has lead on to discussion of this steaming pile of challenging piece of research (click for link),

BIOMETRIC MORPHO-ANATOMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DATING OF THE ANTIQUITY OF A TRIDACTYL HUMANOID SPECIMEN: REGARDING THE CASE OF NASCA-PERU,
published in the Revista de Gestão Social e Ambiental (The Environmental and Social Management Journal).
It was perhaps inevitable that this extraordinary, um, research would encourage similar efforts:


BIOMETRIC MORPHO-ANATOMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DATING OF THE ANTIQUITY OF A QUADRADACTYL HUMANOID SPECIMEN: REGARDING THE CASE OF GREENDALE-PENCASTER

Reginald Huaquero-Eccentrico
Bodger Zookeeper-Ossuary
Vladimir Dracula-Canine
Chacal Root-Canal
David Mentolado Cigarrillo
Edwin Sangria-Molar

Background

Our colleagues Hernàndez-Huaripaucar, Zúñiga-Avilés et al. (2024) have transformed our understanding of biology, pre-Columbian American culture and the likelihood of intelligent extraterrestrial life living on Earth with their revolutionary paper, demonstrating just how far-reaching and flexible a science dentistry is.

As is the case with paradigm shifts, there has been some resistance to this work, see the spin-off journal
Revista de Gestão Social e Ambiental: Refutations, Statements of Concern, Demands for Withdrawal (Established May 2024)
Vols. I (27 May 2024) - XXVII (11 June 2024).

However, inspired by the Nazca study we have reproduced its methodology in our study of a quadradactyl specimen reportedly discovered in the Greendale/ Pencaster area, England: The location has proved difficult to locate on a map, suggestive of a cover-up. Locals have been largely unhelpful in helping us identify the site, perhaps due to long-held taboos.

Unlike the case of the Nazca humanoid, we have unearthed a trove of filmed footage apparently capturing our specimen, and other quadradactyls, going about their lives.
This would appear to provide a limit to the age of the specimen; we suspect it dates from the Holocene.
References to the specimen from folk sources refer to "Plasticine", "Pleistocene" in their dialect? If so, that is too early.
We believe it is 99.99% likely to be post-glaciation; 99.98% 1981 or later.

In line with local custom, we have called our specimen "Postman Pat", after a beloved mythical figure who would travel the community in ceremonial garb carrying messages.
There is evidence of a cult attempting to continue this tradition.
Without the hallowed clothing of yore, and with few real messages to deliver, they instead post paper litter through people's doors. Part of their ritualised behaviour is that should they sight a dog of any form- say, a small Pomeranian terrier looking through a window- they recoil in terror as if a pack of Dire Wolves had scented their blood.

Description

Note the obvious quadradactyl anatomy.

pp3.jpg


Like the Nazca mummy, skull shape appears to diverge from that of standard populations:
(Representative human, left; Greendale specimen, right).

postman pat.jpg

Comparing skull dimensions, we referred to the 1890s tables of Major Whyte Cypress-Emory, late of the Papua New Guinea Colonial Police And Native Dental Service. Unaccountably out of print since 1939, his invaluable

Ed: That's more than enough, thank you. You're accepted for the next issue of "Unreproducible Archaeology and Sociocultural Guesswork". J. Barnum Charlatan, Editor.
 
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Note the missing teeth! This hominid couldn't even defend itself!

(Amazing job, @John J. , it got better and better!)
Some suggest that it had a mutualistic relationship with a member of felidae, which would have been able to provide that role.

However, I think this academic is fake - a real paleontologist would know that the correct term for the digital arrangement in this specimin's upper extremities is tetradactyl, not quadradactyl. BUSTED!
 
But there are tetrapods and quadrupeds.
(Apparently a quadrupod is a kind of a grip on a pencil. English am hard.)
English is only marginally involved: tetrapod invokes the Greek words for "four" and "foot", while quadruped does the same for Latin. "quadradactyl" was only wrong because it mismatched Latin and Greek, "dactyl" indicating "finger", same as in "pterodactyl", which could be translated as "wingfinger".

Now what I would like to see, though, is a picture of the original poppycock, which might solve the question whether it's a bird or a valve. Google was a bit nuts about it for me.
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However, I think this academic is fake - a real paleontologist would know that the correct term for the digital arrangement in this specimin's upper extremities is tetradactyl, not quadradactyl. BUSTED!

For years I've identified as a quintadactyl. I went to quintadactyl clubs, dated other quintadactyls.

A few kind words of truth from FatPhil and I realise, I was pentadactyl all along!
 
For years I've identified as a quintadactyl. I went to quintadactyl clubs, dated other quintadactyls.

A few kind words of truth from FatPhil and I realise, I was pentadactyl all along!
You should've identified as quintadigital. You could've been digital before it was cool!

The Quintadactyl Club??
(I was going to have AI art for this, but I feared it'd get the essential bit wrong...)
 
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