Debunked: Weatherman admits "Meteorological Spraying" [It's Meteorological Spring]

Ross Marsden

Senior Member.
[Admin: The video that this story refers to has since been removed by the maker, George Barnes]

The Weather Channel forecaster seems to say, "it is Saturday March first and of course we are starting meteorological spraying ... ".

Here is the transcript; cleaned up as much as I can.

0:00 [inaudible] Weather Channel forecast and it is Saturday March first and
0:04 of course we are starting
0:05 meteorological spraying with a winter storm that
0:08 will be in tracking into the tri-state area beginning tomorrow afternoon
0:12 continuing right in to Monday...

So, what does this mean? Have George and I heard this wrong? "... meteorological spraying ... "

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UPDATE via @solrey: The weatherman is actually saying "we are starting meteorological spring".
Meteorological spring starts on March 1st. In Meteorological terms "Spring" is March, April and May. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spring_(season)#Meteorological_reckoning
Meteorologists generally define four seasons in many climatic areas: spring, summer, autumn (fall) and winter. ... Spring, when defined in this manner, can start on different dates in different regions. In terms of complete months, in most north temperate zone locations, spring months are March, April and May
Content from External Source


The irony of a huge storm arriving at the start of "spring" is a big of a joke for weather forecasters:http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2014/03/01/weather-blog-march-1-and-snow-on-the-way/

By Carol Erickson, March 1st 2014

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — It might be meteorological spring today, but everything else points to the dead of winter.
Content from External Source
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/...-supposed-to-be-over-20140228,0,7018325.story

Staff report and WGN-TV
7:05 a.m. CST, March 1, 2014

March may mark the beginning of meteorological spring, but with up to half a foot of snow expected this weekend, winter is beginning to resemble a guest that doesn't know when to leave.
Content from External Source
http://www.myfoxboston.com/story/24...ows-sunday-followed-by-slipper-monday-commute

FROM FOX 25 METEOROLOGIST SARAH WROBLEWSKI
Posted: Mar 01, 2014 3:58 PM PST

We had sunshine to start the first day of Meteorological spring, but temperatures failed to meet the normal highs (low 40s) for this time of year, only hitting the mid-30s.
Content from External Source
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
so this guy sits in his car filming his radio with his cell phone waiting for the weather guy to say something funny?
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
so this guy sits in his car filming his radio with his cell phone waiting for the weather guy to say something funny?
He says the station had been repeating it…which seems perfectly likely.

Some People, however, have decided that the "smoking gun" admission they craved is finally here. :confused:

Googling "Weather Channel" + "meteorological spraying" I'm not finding a single result
that predates reaction to this morning's passing comment…
suggesting that it is not terminology in the Weather Channel vernacular…

(nor am I seeing any current news stories about a dramatic Weather Channel "gaffe" or whatnot)
 
Last edited by a moderator:

deirdre

Senior Member.
the glossary said there's "blow spray" as a term. so its possible he's referring to that. but this being the tristate and us swimming in snow all winter, sounds more like a joke to me. but I'm just speculating.

http://www.weather.com/glossary/b.html

BLOWING SNOW
Snowthat is raised by thewindto heights of six feet or greater. It is reported as "BLSN" in anobservationand on theMETAR.
blowing spray
Salt spraythat is raised by thewindto heights of six feet or greater. It is reported as "BLPY" in anobservationand on theMETAR.
Content from External Source
 

Ross Marsden

Senior Member.
The guy is George Barnes, owner of Skyderalert.com.

His relevance to chemtrails/contrails is the mobile app he commissioned for taking photos of persistent contrails, and forwarding these to elected officials with a peition complaing about geoengineering, and calling for a ban.

I have no idea how he came to get this soundbite on video.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Spraying the roads is commonly done before a storm arrives in the Tri-State area (NY/NJ/CT). Since the reporter was talking about a storm arriving tomorrow, maybe he's talking about spraying the roads today.

They are starting spraying because of the storm, not to create it - they can't, it's already on the way.

"They spray the roads with salt water to give them an advantage in the battle of the ice storms."

Published on Feb 4, 2014

Highway crews are ready to roll with salt and sand for the season's first winter storm. But they don't wait until the sleet begins, because it's all about getting a head start on melting whatever falls. That's the reason they begin putting down salt about eight hours before the ice storm begins.

Monday morning, workers began mixing salt and sand to prepare for a long night of keeping highways passable. Trucks are also loaded with salt brine to spray on the road. The pretreatment helps keep the ice from bonding to the pavement.. The sand and salt mixture gives drivers a better grip.
Content from External Source

http://www.nj.gov/transportation/about/press/2011/113011.shtm


Current NJDOT stockpiles include:
• 153,000 tons of rock salt
• 618,000 gallons of liquid calcium
• 116,000 gallons of brine

Liquid calcium is used to coat rock salt and improve its effectiveness in melting snow and ice. Brine is sprayed on road surfaces prior to a storm to start melting snow as soon as it hits the road. Brine is also used in the same manner as liquid calcium, to treat rock salt and improve its effectiveness.
Content from External Source
 

solrey

Senior Member.
March 1st is Meteorological SPRING! Listen closely to his inflection, he's drawing out the i in spring a bit like he did with "saturday march fiiiirst", he draws out the a in aaaaand also. "...and it is saturday march fiiiirst, aaand of course we're starting meteorological spriiiing with a winter storm." SPRING lol... People hear what they want to hear.

http://www.startribune.com/local/247961181.html
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
March 1st is Meteorological SPRING! Listen closely to his inflection, he's drawing out the i in spring a bit like he did with "saturday march fiiiirst", he draws out the a in aaaaand also. "...and it is saturday march fiiiirst, aaand of course we're starting meteorological spriiiing with a winter storm." SPRING lol... People hear what they want to hear.

http://www.startribune.com/local/247961181.html

Winner.

That's the problem with telling people what they will hear before they hear it. The Observer Expectancy Effect.

I'll edit the OP with this info
 

Ross Marsden

Senior Member.
March 1st is Meteorological SPRING! Listen closely to his inflection, he's drawing out the i in spring a bit like he did with "saturday march fiiiirst", he draws out the a in aaaaand also. "...and it is saturday march fiiiirst, aaand of course we're starting meteorological spriiiing with a winter storm." SPRING lol... People hear what they want to hear.

http://www.startribune.com/local/247961181.html

Yes! I think this is correct.
I have the same interpretation from an independent observer. It's his strong Saratoga accent. Meteorological Spring!
 

deirdre

Senior Member.
Winner.

That's the problem with telling people what they will hear before they hear it. The Observer Expectancy Effect.

I'll edit the OP with this info
it doesn't help if you've never heard of "meteorological spring" before.
 

JRBids

Senior Member.
It sounded like SPRING to me the first time I heard it. Even though I read "spraying". I listened twice. Spring. Sheesh.
 

Balance

Senior Member.
At the risk of showing my ignorance (and don't get me wrong, I hear the word "spring" instead of spraying too and agree it's most likely what was said) but how does this debunking differ to the assumption we were discussing in the UFO thread, which has been argued and marked as not debunked?

I'm not trying to argue, I want to learn
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
At the risk of showing my ignorance (and don't get me wrong, I hear the word "spring" instead of spraying too and agree it's most likely what was said) but how does this debunking differ to the assumption we were discussing in the UFO thread, which has been argued and marked as not debunked?

I'm not trying to argue, I want to learn

The Quadcopter UFO thread was not "marked as not debunked", I'd just added and removed the debunked label as the original debunk (police drone) originally seemed correct, but turned out it was flat wrong. And now the the OP needs a little work to clarify everything. The actual drone has not been identified, and the video is very poor, so we can't be 100% sure what it is. It's still essentially debunked though - as there's a very good explanation that fits perfectly.

Compare that with this, it's >99.9999% certain he's saying "spring". It's quite obvious when you listen to it, and there are lots of other examples of the same thing, and the the "spraying" phrase has never been utter by a weatherman ever.

Not a vast difference though.
 

mrfintoil

Senior Member.
I get the impression that the arguments for "chemtrails" becomes more and more desperate for every new one that shows up.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
George's mistake of "meteorological spraying" has now entered the chemtrails lexicon:

It will be amusing if it catches on.
 

NoParty

Senior Member.
George's mistake of "meteorological spraying" has now entered the chemtrails lexicon:

It will be amusing if it catches on.
I don't think it will. Not only did George remove his silly vid in the middle of the night, this guy has changed the title from:

"meteorological spraying over Kings Cross…" to

"Geoengineering over Kings Cross…"

Screen Shot 2014-03-02 at 12.27.32 PM.png
 
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Woody

Member
Never heard of spraying salt, is this an Eastern thing or what they say in the south? I have NEVER heard anyone indicate spraying salt, probably because it indicates a liquid and salt is a solid that is dumped. Might be a slang in another part of the nation but they never use this term in the midwest.
Spraying the roads is commonly done before a storm arrives in the Tri-State area (NY/NJ/CT). Since the reporter was talking about a storm arriving tomorrow, maybe he's talking about spraying the roads today.

They are starting spraying because of the storm, not to create it - they can't, it's already on the way.

"They spray the roads with salt water to give them an advantage in the battle of the ice storms."

Published on Feb 4, 2014

Highway crews are ready to roll with salt and sand for the season's first winter storm. But they don't wait until the sleet begins, because it's all about getting a head start on melting whatever falls. That's the reason they begin putting down salt about eight hours before the ice storm begins.

Monday morning, workers began mixing salt and sand to prepare for a long night of keeping highways passable. Trucks are also loaded with salt brine to spray on the road. The pretreatment helps keep the ice from bonding to the pavement.. The sand and salt mixture gives drivers a better grip.
Content from External Source

http://www.nj.gov/transportation/about/press/2011/113011.shtm


Current NJDOT stockpiles include:
• 153,000 tons of rock salt
• 618,000 gallons of liquid calcium
• 116,000 gallons of brine

Liquid calcium is used to coat rock salt and improve its effectiveness in melting snow and ice. Brine is sprayed on road surfaces prior to a storm to start melting snow as soon as it hits the road. Brine is also used in the same manner as liquid calcium, to treat rock salt and improve its effectiveness.
Content from External Source
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Never heard of spraying salt, is this an Eastern thing or what they say in the south? I have NEVER heard anyone indicate spraying salt, probably because it indicates a liquid and salt is a solid that is dumped. Might be a slang in another part of the nation but they never use this term in the midwest.

Well, you've heard of it now. But that's not what this thread is about, just some speculation about what was said that turned out to be wrong. No need to go off topic.
 

Trailblazer

Moderator
Staff member
Slightly related, Harold Saive thinks this weather report is suspicious: "It's a weather front that's got pulses of energy on it and it's been generating these heavy, and in places, thundery showers"

upload_2016-9-27_19-22-34.png

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6DGT8gUMgxc



Weather fronts have energy in them naturally, of course: the movement and warmth of the atmosphere see to that. Anything above absolute zero (or even at absolute zero, if you want to be picky) has energy in it.
 

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