Coronavirus Related Shortages in Shops

LogiCat

New Member
Seems like VIC821 comes in varieties, both FFP1 and FFP2. You want FFP2, although FFP1 is certainly a lot better than nothing.

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Unfortunately, masks aren't going to keep anyone safe, because people don't have a clue how to use them properly, efficiently, or that people just don't have any substantial manners or common sense anymore.

People think wearing a mask is going to save them. WRONG! This is a virus. It is on anything that a contaminated person has touched or breathed on. Wearing a mask isn't going to help if you handle or touch contaminated surfaces or items and then rub your eye or scratch your nose, or wipe your mouth with your fingers.

Medical professionals are even stating that people need to save their money for possible health insurance payments, or drug costs, instead of wasting money on something that doesn't really do any good. If your Dr. deems it necessary for you to wear a mask, then buy some masks. Otherwise, you are just wasting your money.

Medical professionals are also suggesting wearing masks are more detrimental than beneficial, as it takes a respirator mask to filter the coronavirus, not a painters mask, surgical mask, flu mask, or dust mask. And the correct medical/virus respirator masks are usually more expensive than most people can afford.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/taraha...ht-increase-your-infection-risk/#47bdbb05676c

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/t...r-facemasks-because-of-coronavirus-2020-01-30
 

LogiCat

New Member
In the US, the most common disasters are earthquakes and hurricanes. In both those water supplies are disrupted, so "emergency preparation", in most people's minds, includes water (and batteries).

This is a bit different, as there's the idea of being confined to home for an indefinite length of time. Hence toilet paper and food. Although I think the TP thing (and to some extent the water thing) was largely driven by people doing it because other people were doing it. If there are apparent shortages of something then people hoard that thing, which leads to shortages.

The shortages are just short term ones - in some cases just revolving around the normal nightly re-stocking. Stores and supplies are adjusting, but also I think they don't want over-correct and end up with truckloads of stuff with nowhere to go.
There is nothing wrong with the water supply. Even areas that have less than "perfect" tap water can just buy a water filter for the faucet, or do like my granny did...boil the tap water and then run it through some carbon filter, and then put it in some large jugs for safe keeping, and one in the fridge for drinking.

Unless there is some sort of disaster happening with a cities water system, then there is no need to be hoarding bottled water, especially when you can do it yourself at home with tap water. Of course, this requires working brain cells to figure this out, which apparently is becoming less and less common.
 
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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
There is nothing wrong with the water supply.
No but my point was that buying bottled water is a very common recommendation for disasters, but not one that applies here. People are simple going into "disaster" mode, without considering the nuances.

I bought some bottled water, as I'm on a well, and I'd want to avoid being forced to go out if there's a power outage.
 

qed

Senior Member
Is it true that wearing these masks has absolutely no benefit when venturing into public, assuming one is washing ones hands properly after touching anything or anyone. Why do we see health professionals wearing them when interacting with the public?
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Is it true that wearing these masks has absolutely no benefit when venturing into public, assuming one is washing ones hands properly after touching anything or anyone. Why do we see health professionals wearing them when interacting with the public?
No, it's not true. The transmission is mostly from respiration - breathing in particles that other people have breathed or coughed out. If someone is standing in front of you (or near you) and coughs, then the mask might prevent infection. The better the mask, the more it will stop.

But just walking around, it's probably not going to make much difference. It depends on how close you get to people.
 

deirdre

Moderator
Staff member
bottled water is probably a good idea if you have someone sick in your house anyway. its one less contaminated thing the non sick have to handle and wash. plus its gross to wake up mid night and drink from a water glass that dust has been settling in all night. so caps are handy.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I went back to Nugget today. It seemed mostly normal, although no toilet paper this time (lots of people buying paper towels). A few odd things out (extra-firm Tofu, some types of onions and tomatoes, some meats) But overall well-stocked, loads of fresh produce. Not crowded.

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I stocked up a bit more.
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tinkertailor

Senior Member
In LA, it's pretty common to see people carrying 4 pallets of bottled water on a non-disaster related Costco run, so here at least it's the idea that "my beloved Crystal Geyser might run low, I need to get some now so I won't have to venture outdoors where it will be contaminated", and so they run out. Mick's right in that the buying creates more buying, people sharing pictures of lines into Walmart.
The interesting thing for me is that I'm a very frugal and environmentally conscious person, so a lot of the things people are panic buying are things I already either depend on, have used for years, or have wanted to use for years. My Instant Pot and I do a lot of bulk brown rice, lentils, quinoa, and beans. In the past week, coworkers have gone from looking over their fast food bags and asking how I get my protein as a vegetarian to now saying "oh that's smart, you're stocked up I bet!". People around me have gone from "You want to buy a bidet??? Why??!!?" to "Hey, where did you source your bidet? Amazon sold out and I'm worried about toilet paper running low."
 

Agent K

Active Member
Why water, I wonder. That was the first thing that I noticed when venturing into Sam's club. I usually have a case of bottled water in my garage to grab, if I need one in the car, or if I am going somewhere that I am not going to be able to get water, like a bike ride, or something like that. But generally, most of my water comes from the good ol' tap. Do people think that COVID 19 is going to hit the water supply? I can see toilet paper and food, because you don't want to have to go out into the world, but how much bottled water do people go through regularly?
Dr. Anthony Fauci recommended stocking up on bottled water. It was the first thing he listed, and he mentioned it twice.
"...specifically for coronavirus, if you're going to be confined to a place where you can't have access to things, I think the standard things, you know, bottled water... canned foods, water, particularly bottled water that you have that available. to you."
Source: https://youtu.be/63M9ZQd2B7M?t=107
 

Agent K

Active Member
Is it true that wearing these masks has absolutely no benefit when venturing into public, assuming one is washing ones hands properly after touching anything or anyone. Why do we see health professionals wearing them when interacting with the public?
Do health professionals wear masks in public when they're not working, just as private citizens? They wear masks when working, presumably because the masks protect them from the virus when used correctly.

The sick are urged to wear surgical masks to avoid infecting others, but infected people may be contagious before they show symptoms, so China requires everyone to wear masks by law to avoid spreading the virus.
 
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Leifer

Senior Member
I'm in LA, CA.
Shelves of toilet paper were emptied.
Good thing I shopped in bulk last month.
I think the hoarding will slow down, as worried people will become saturated, and stocked-up, and the demand will slow.
Otherwise there's a history of anal Hygiene and alternatives.....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anal_hygiene

As for fresh (potable) water, I was able to find Brita filters, and I always keep a 35gallon water tank in my bathroom.....mostly for earthquake preparedness (add a few tablespoons of bleach every few months). But the water supply is not a primary concern here.
Most market canned goods are in low supply, due to hoarding.
It's a good thing I know how to cook dry beans, make pasta, and especially make yeasty bread.
You can turn one packet of yeast into a lifetime supply, if it is maintained with added fresh flour and a cool environment (underground if necessary).
The freezer is my friend.
But you can't freeze lettuce....or other fresh veggies. Knowing how to either pack and pickle them is a small art....something I have been in the midst of learning well before this threat. Salt is important.
Gardening knowledge is great for the long-term. Citrus prevents scurvy, and is an immunity booster.
I sound like a homesteader.....only because I live in a potential dire earthquake zone.....and I'm also responsible for a rather helpless 86yo father with diabetes and heart issues.
......so his insulin and heart meds needs to have at least at a 90 day supply, if possible.

My art/painting profession left me with 3 boxes of disposable gloves, isopropanol alcohol, but only a few N95 masks.
 
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Leifer

Senior Member
Tip for making fresh parsley and leafy coriander.....stay fresh longer in your fridge....
Cut the stalks slightly, and immediately stand them up in a coffee mug of water.
Then loosely cover them with a plastic bag, perhaps with a vent hole at the top.
Set them in your fridge, upright..
This will allow them to last twice as long, as opposed to just leaving them alone in a plastic bag in your fridge, unattended to.
 

Leifer

Senior Member
In LA, it's pretty common to see people carrying 4 pallets of bottled water on a non-disaster related Costco run,.........
I actually saw people stocking-up on many cans of Pringles potato chips.
....among all the other more healthy choices with more nutrition ?
I may have underestimated (or witnessed) the health of an America's diet.
(this not an "lol"......it does seem unfortunate)
To be fair, I too, purchased some "treats", because I may be tethered to isolation for a while......and treats add some mental relief.
But 10 cans of Pringles ?
 

deirdre

Moderator
Staff member
But 10 cans of Pringles ?
they might have many people in their family. and Pringles are probably like twinkies.. they last for years :)

I bought some high calorie stuff too ( and xtra multivitamins) because healthy is nice, but if youre starving and have little body fat storage, you need calories.
 

Agent K

Active Member
they might have many people in their family. and Pringles are probably like twinkies.. they last for years :)

I bought some high calorie stuff too ( and xtra multivitamins) because healthy is nice, but if youre starving and have little body fat storage, you need calories.
Once you pop, you can't stop.
And, "Once you taste the flavor, then you get the fever, then you've got the fever for the flavor of a Pringle!"
Hmm, the Pringle Jingle doesn't have the same ring to it now.

Once you have the fever, you won't feel like eating, and you definitely won't feel like cooking.
 

Keith Beachy

Senior Member
There was plenty of what I wanted at the grocery store on base (commissary). However, I left because the line was 20 to 30 times longer than usual, it wrapped around 3/4 of the store. So I "punted", I went to the BX (like target, no food, but on base), and bought 48 bottles of beer, which is better than TP. Did not need TP, or paper towels, we always have a month supply or more, we host 5 or more grandkids sometimes... (they closed the back gate, so it doubled by time to drive and distance, Darn)
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oops, I got water too, we use it for travel, ball games (oops), etc. My goal on thursday, 99 bottles of beer, and shop normal if possible.
 

deirdre

Moderator
Staff member
It's a modern problem. It would not have been viable to do this a few years ago. Mostly harmless until now - when people who actually need the products can't get them. It's a bit of a quandary for pure free-marketers, as it's a type of rapidly exploitable market that was not envisaged in classical economics.
He's donating them now and might be in big trouble with the state
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/t...just-donated-them/ar-BB11e2tR?ocid=spartanntp

 

qed

Senior Member
How long should we horde for?

I horded for about two weeks, so 48 energy drinks:), but am now reconsidering.
 
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deirdre

Moderator
Staff member
I horded for about two weeks, so 48 energy drinks,
if you can survive 48 energy drinks in 2 weeks, I think you;ll survive coronavirus.

you need to 'put away' 2 weeks worth of supplies in case you get sick. (no energy drinks when you are sick..you want crackers, chicken noodle etc)
then you need to stock food items for as long as you dont want to go into a grocery store. but here in America I believe the grocery stores will adapt and do something like we can order online and they'll bring it out to our cars if this doesn't die down soon. I have enough food for probably 2 months. 1 month if I don't want to eat pasta and beans, oatmeal every night :)
 

Agent K

Active Member
Q: Why was toilet paper sold out faster than facial tissues?
A: Because one person sneezes, and everyone shits their pants.
 

Graham2001

Active Member
Planning to get up early tomorrow morning in the hope that I can get toilet paper at the local shop. In my area they cleaned out the cheapest stuff at the 'big box' stores and then moved onto the smaller shops. The one at the top of my street had all it's toilet paper and most of the paper towels cleaned out the last time I was there, but most of the other shelves were intact. They said they hoped to restock tomorrow.

If anyone wants a simple filling recipe take a can of soup and a packet of microwaveable rice, cook the soup in a saucepan and microwave the rice, when the soup is cooked stir the rice into the soup.
 

Keith Beachy

Senior Member
I understand the toilet paper. The people who work don't use a lot of toilet paper at home. When sent home, they have to buy toilet paper, and are stuck with what is there. Retired, I have about a month or two of TP. What do you have? Okay, we also host up to 5 to seven family members sometimes so a 60 day supply becomes a week or two. Point is, will there be normal lines Thursday, or will it be a bad day to shop...
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I have about a month or two of TP. What do you have?
We've got plenty. But we shop mostly at Cosco and normally get a 30 mega-roll pack. We had half a pack left, and when we did a shop before the TPHTF (Feb 27th) I'd been reading about TP shortages in Australia. So I got another pack, just to be safe. It did not seem like there was any big demand at that point. Then when I did my exploratory shop (March 11) I picked up another 12 pack - it seemed like they (Nugget) were very well-stocked at the time, although the other stores had empty shelves. When I actually did my "this is it" shop (March 15) the toilet paper shelves at Nugget were bare.
 

Z.W. Wolf

Senior Member
Small sample - N=2 - but shelves in Las Vegas stores keep getting more bare. They can't seem to catch up. Maybe it's because we're geogrphically remote. We're an island in the desert.
 

derwoodii

Senior Member
shortages of some stock items in Melbourne markets are still very hit n miss.. The government has stepped in and removed suburban truck transport delivery curfews as this has been claimed a primary block for faster restocking

The Aus farmers org says if Oz grown food exports slightly slow we will have a glut of produce
 

TEEJ

Senior Member
In the UK pasta, rice, toilet rolls and cleaning products are being targeted by the panic buyers. Very difficult to get the large bags of rice and pasta. This week most supermarkets have put a limit per product. Usually 2 per individual product. Some stores have a 4 limit. It was a good decision in order to make it fair to other shoppers. Most supermarkets are closing at night an hour or two earlier in order for re-stocking. Some supermarkets are desperate for workers and especially delivery drivers.

Here in the UK they really need to up the limit on "tap to pay" debit card transactions. It would really assist in the touching of key pads in order to enter pin numbers. Anything over 30 pounds sterling and you have to push the card in and touch the key pads. I use the end of a pen to get around direct contact with the key pad.

Probably too much info but one emergency solution to the lack of toilet rolls is a portable bidet bowl. I have one on order! lol As already pointed out people are going to be using alternatives such as wet wipes, etc and flushing them blocking up the sewers and pipes.

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This made me chuckle!

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Noted in the UK!

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Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
I just got back from Folsom's Costco. They were much less crowded than usual. They had plenty of toilet paper and bread. No real empty shelves.
 

Landru

Moderator
Staff member
I just got back from Folsom's Costco. They were much less crowded than usual. They had plenty of toilet paper and bread. No real empty shelves.
I think we are starting to reach the level where everyone has bought more than they needed and now must consume it.
 

deirdre

Moderator
Staff member
My mom got a Whole foods delivery today, she added tp to the list this morning just because she decided she was curious if they had it. she did not get tp. or eggs. she did get milk, a bag of onions, one single potato, and 1 small yogurt. (she didn't order 1 potato or 1 small yogurt obviously, but I guess that's all they had)
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Also popped into Forklift (like Nugget, but a bit more down to earth).

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There were some posted limits.
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Shortages I remember:
  • Bread - about 90% gone.
  • Tofu
  • Pasta - 80% of the common types of pasta gone. But still plenty left if you don't mind substituting penne with elbows.
  • Pasta Sauces - particularly marinara sauce and meat sauce.
  • I didn't check toilet paper.
Overall much less people and shortages than I expected. Very few people wearing masks (maybe 1%). It all felt a little surreal.

We don't plan on leaving the house (except for walks/jogging) for at least two weeks now
 

JamesTheRealist

New Member
I work in a store for now and have seen what customers are buying. Toilet paper has gone crazy, one time we had to rush to put out 8 pallets of around 60 items only for it to go in a day. After that people went for kitchen roll with a group of two saying “would you rather wipe your a** with this or your hands”, it seems people are quite concerned they will run out. We haven’t rationed anything but sanitizer yet. People won’t be shopping for certain supplies for a while yet
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
If you want a laugh, check out how much people are willing to pay for toilet paper on Ebay
I don't think those $10,000 bids are real, as that 27 roll pack is going for about $200 including shipping
Metabunk 2020-03-23 14-59-35.jpg

At Costco yesterday they had loads of these 30-packs of Charmin TP for $22.99. Limit to one per customer because of this:
Metabunk 2020-03-23 15-03-31.jpg
 
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