Can someone debunk this George Washington quote?

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TemplarJLS

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"All Freemasonry should be disbanded in America because our organization has been infiltrated by the Illuminati and they have bad intention for America and the World"
 
"All Freemasonry should be disbanded in America because our organization has been infiltrated by the Illuminati and they have bad intention for America and the World"

Could you at least give some context here? Where does it appear? What's the earliest you can find? Is there any evidence it is real?
 
Could you at least give some context here? Where does it appear? What's the earliest you can find? Is there any evidence it is real?

It didn't match any Google Book results, and when I search for the quote, all I get is this Yahoo Answers page:

https://br.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20101012150743AAe5yn8

Of course the best anwers says they never heard of the quote either.

One of the answerd said this:

"Well, it's not George Washington. I've read just about everything he wrote and there's nothing mystical in his words. My first impression when I read this, is that it doesn't sound like Washington at all. The Illuminati were a Bavarian (German) group that hoped to take over the world. They had nothing to do with the Masons or with America's Founders. This is just another one of those fake statements that usually spring up on conspiracy websites."

I guess it's safe to say the quote never existed.
 
all I get is this Yahoo Answers page:

I get
External Quote:
Regarding the quote: Googling the quote results in 2 entries from InfoWars and 1 from dprogram.net, so I believe it safe to say they're full of it. George Washington had a Masonic funeral, so I don't believe he renounced the Fraternity.

To quote George Washington in a letter to G.W. Snyder, 25SEP1798:
I believe notwithstanding, that none of the Lodges in this Country are contaminated with the principles ascribed to the Society of the Illuminati.

http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/r?ammem/mgw:@field(DOCID+@lit(gw360346))
You'll note that my quote is from an actual letter from George Washington, located at the Library of Congress, not some conspiracy theorist website.
http://www.ar15.com/archive/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=860155

and a letter oct 24, 1798 14 months before he died.


Although I see no evidence GW said those particular words, I stumbled across this link which is interesting if true. I did not fact check any of the facts on this link though.

External Quote:

In 1798, an English scientist and inventor named John Robinson wroteProofs of a Conspiracy against all the Religions and Governments of Europe, carried on in the secret meetings of Freemasons, Illuminati and Reading Societies.

In 1803, Jesuit priest Abbe Agustin Barruel wroteMemoirs, Illustrating the History of Jacobinism. Both authors disliked the French Revolution, and so they blamed it on a small group of conspirators: the “Illuminati”.

Robinson and Barruel argued that the Order of Illuminists didn’t really disband in 1787, but only went underground. They claimed this “Illuminati” had secretly plotted and carried out the French Revolution, and were still hiding in Masonic lodges, planning to overthrow governments in Europe and America. Robinson and Barruel disliked revolution, and they didn’t think it was possible for millions of people to mobilize together and change the conditions of their lives.

To them, ordinary people weren’t organized or smart enough to pull it off. They needed to be guided like sheep by an elite group. In this way, Robinson and Barruel’s original Illuminati theory was a kind of conservative myth, used to make sense of a social reality its authors found confusing and scary.

Today’s Illuminati theory follows the same pattern. Even poor people who draw on Illuminati theory, who might otherwise sympathize with protest movements, often view movements as secret ploys by the Illuminati to cause trouble. https://libcom.org/library/how-overthrow-illuminati
 
The general tone of the quote is not incompatible with actual American politics, but not really in Washington's time. It was quite the conspiracy theory in the 1800s.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-Masonic_Party
External Quote:
The Anti-Masonic Party was formed in upstate New York in 1828.[2] Anti-Masons were opponents of Freemasonry, believing that it was a corrupt and elitistsecret society which was attempting to rule the country in defiance of republican principles.[3] During a period of social upheaval caused by the Industrial Revolution and westward migration, community and family relationships weakened, causing many people to become skeptical of government and other longstanding institutions. Since Masonic lodges were a stable institution, and because many Masons were active in government and business and were prominent in society, Freemasonry was an obvious target for critics and skeptics.

The opponents of Freemasonry formed a political party after the Morgan affair convinced them the Masons were murdering men who spoke out against them. This key episode was the mysterious 1826 disappearance of William Morgan, a Freemason of Batavia, New York. Morgan had been a member of the lodge in Rochester, New York, but was denied admission in Batavia.[5] He intended to retaliate by publishing a book detailing the supposed secrets of Masonry's initiation rituals. When his intentions became known to the Batavia lodge, an attempt was made to burn down the business of the printer who planned to publish Morgan's book.[6] In September 1826 Morgan was arrested on flimsy allegations of theft in an effort to prevent publication of his book by keeping him in jail. The individual who intended to publish Morgan's book paid his bail, and he was released from custody. Shortly afterwards, Morgan disappeared
 
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