Anti-5G necklaces found to be radioactive

Mendel

Senior Member.
Article:
Necklaces and accessories claiming to "protect" people from 5G mobile networks have been found to be radioactive.

The Dutch authority for nuclear safety and radiation protection (ANVS) issued a warned about ten products it found gave off harmful ionising radiation.

It urged people not to use the products, which could cause harm with long-term wear.

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The products identified included an "Energy Armor" sleeping mask, bracelet and necklace.

A bracelet for children, branded Magnetix Wellness, was also found to be emitting radiation.

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Believing in bunk can be hazardous to your health.
 

jarlrmai

Senior Member
This always amazes me, surely its easier to just make 'harmless' placebo items to scam people than to go out of your way to make something actively dangerous.
 

Ravi

Senior Member.
I went to the originating website on this, ANVS. Interesting warning, of course. But I failed to find out what level of "ionising radiation" was found in the products. Because everything depends on the doses and the type of radiation, I found this a bit weird. Not weird if you know that the target is the "general public", but still I would expect some more scientific links or even measured data.. Oh well.

EDIT

I found the document with the data! Very nice read: https://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/2021-0239.pdf
Warning, it is in Dutch.

To help the ones having difficulty reading it, here is an excerpt:
In all found products, decay products of thorium-232 (Th-232) series were found, and 6 out of 10 products also contained nuclides from uranium-238 (U-238) and uranium-235 (U-235) series. The largest contribution came from the daughter nuclides from the Th-232 series. The activity concentration was between 6.4 ± 0.6 and 74 ± 8 Bq g-1, and the total activity ranged from 5.9 ± 0.4 to 780 ± 80 Bq per object.
 
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Mendel

Senior Member.
Ravi's post confirms what I was researching.

Rare Earth ores are generally contaminated with radioactive isotopes; the mining and refining of elements like neodymium involves large amounts of radioactive waste.

If you source super cheap neodymium magnets for your scam operation, chances are they may be low-grade (e.g. from one of the small illegal mining operations in China; I also remember a scammer in the US being involved in rare earths refining) and not as pure as they should be.

Here's a 1934 analysis, from before purification was perfected:
Article:
Neodymium emits beta-rays of maximum Hρ value 355 and 2.4 mm of air penetrating power.

This wouldn't be a problem in an electric motor, a generator, or a loudspeaker, but I wouldn't want that on my skin as a necklace, bracelet, or bluetooth earbuds.

This always amazes me, surely its easier to just make 'harmless' placebo items to scam people than to go out of your way to make something actively dangerous.
The bracelet makers weren't actively endangering customers, they were just cheap.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
I found the document with the data! Very nice read: https://www.rivm.nl/bibliotheek/rapporten/2021-0239.pdf
SmartSelect_20211218-153455_Samsung Notes.jpg

One of the youtube videos cited in the report is still online. The youtuber states that he has contacted Amazon and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and got these products shut down. He also says that some of these products advertised to produce "negative ions" contain radioactive material purposely, and that users may be in danger to inhale radioactive dust.

Source: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3BA5bw1EV5I

SmartSelect_20211218-154644_Samsung Internet.jpg
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
The other video cited in the Dutch report is also still online. It goes more into the technicalities of measuring radiation, and its health effects, but he also finds Thorium powder in a massager wand and embedded into a plastic bracelet. The youtuber surmises that "Tourmaline" powder sold as "negative ion powder" is really radioactive thorium powder, since actual tourmaline doesn't release negative ions.
Source: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=C7TwBUxxIC0

Screenshot_20211218-162450_Samsung Internet.jpg

It looks to me like trusting science deniers to make safe products is a bit of a gamble. :p
 

Ravi

Senior Member.
The other video cited in the Dutch report is also still online. It goes more into the technicalities of measuring radiation, and its health effects, but he also finds Thorium powder in a massager wand and embedded into a plastic bracelet. The youtuber surmises that "Tourmaline" powder sold as "negative ion powder" is really radioactive thorium powder, since actual tourmaline doesn't release negative ions.

It looks to me like trusting science deniers to make safe products is a bit of a gamble. :p
I would not be surprised if some actually think that ionising radiation is healthy. o_O
Just like in the past when (because unknown yet) radiation was nice and new and good for a lot of purposes.. Haha well that turned out a bit different didn't it.
 

Mendel

Senior Member.
I would not be surprised if some actually think that ionising radiation is healthy. o_O
Yes, but selling this as 5G protection?
I don't think anyone who fears 5G likes radioactivity, they just don't make the connection because they also believe the "negative ions" bunk.
 

Mick West

Administrator
Staff member
Similar study:
Article:
A particular category of jewelry is one involving bracelets and necklaces that are deliberately made to contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM)—purveyors making unsubstantiated claims for health benefits from the release of negative ions. Conversely, within the bounds of the linear no-threshold model, long-term use presents a radiological risk to wearers. Evaluation is conducted herein of the radiological risk arising from wearing these products and gamma-ray spectrometry is used to determine the radioactivity levels and annual effective dose of 15 commercially available bracelets (samples B1 to B15) and five necklaces (samples N16 to N20). Various use scenarios are considered; a Geant4 Monte Carlo (Geant4 MC) simulation is also performed to validate the experimental results. The dose conversion coefficient for external radiation and skin equivalent doses were also evaluated. Among the necklaces, sample N16 showed the greatest levels of radioactivity, at 246 ± 35, 1682 ± 118, and 221 ± 40 Bq, for 238U, 232Th, and 40K, respectively. For the bracelets, for 238U and 232Th, sample B15 displayed the greatest level of radioactivity, at 146 ± 21 and 980 ± 71 Bq, respectively. N16 offered the greatest percentage concentrations of U and Th, with means of 0.073 ± 0.0002% and 1.51 ± 0.0015%, respectively, giving rise to an estimated annual effective dose exposure of 1.22 mSv, substantially in excess of the ICRP recommended limit of 1 mSv/year.
 

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