1. Pete Tar

    Pete Tar Moderator Staff Member

    This is interesting but it's hard to tell if it's legitimate, and there's no back-up articles or references, sounds a little dubious.
    http://www.independent.ie/business/...lobal-warming-gm-and-pesticides-29525621.html
    And how does this sit with people who claim that wi-fi radiation is cancerous and harmful?
     
  2. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

    The claims are laughably fantastic for something as simple as applying radio waves to water. Without explaining the mechanism or presenting the data you can't really make much more of an assessment. The claims are reminiscent of unsupported new age ideas about charged water.

    http://www.chargedwater.com/products/
    http://www.chargedforlife.com

    I wouldn't take articles like this seriously if there is no data to back it up.
     
  3. MikeC

    MikeC Closed Account

    • Like Like x 1
  4. Pete Tar

    Pete Tar Moderator Staff Member

    What does making 'water wetter' mean? Would that mean alkalising, if alkaline water is more 'slippery'? Does 'charging' water have anything to do with ionising? Are radio waves normally reflected and not absorbed by water?
     
  5. Pete Tar

    Pete Tar Moderator Staff Member

    Yikes, I see it comes from a long and established pedigree of bunk.
     
  6. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

  7. Pete Tar

    Pete Tar Moderator Staff Member

    Making water 'wetter' is tied to claims associated with ionising and alkalising water.

    However, it is not clear from the article if it is the same supposed process achieving this, as it only talks about 'charging' the water through radio waves, not ionizing or alkalising.
    http://www.chem1.com/CQ/ionbunk.html
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2013
  8. Pete Tar

    Pete Tar Moderator Staff Member

    A spirited evisceration of the article...
     
  9. Sausalito

    Sausalito Active Member

    Maybe I can use some "energized water" to recharge the batteries in my Woo Detector.
     
  10. Bill Nye talked about making "water wetter" once! That's what soap does. Basically, it makes it so that the liquid can adhere to surfaces better, e.g. dirt and oil. Bleach is an alkali (i.e. base i.e. opposite of acid). Put a drop of bleach in a cup of water and feel it. That's "wetter water." "Slippery" is a good way to describe it.

    In most parts of the word, the soil is slightly acidic. Applying alkali can bring up the pH, making them closer to neutral. One of the reasons my home province of Saskatchewan has such great agriculture is that our soil is naturally alkaline.

    As for charging water, it's bogus. You might be able to charge it temporarily by pumping it full of electrons, but as soon as you remove the source, the water will tend to balance its charge with its surroundings. More likely, you'll break the H2O's apart and end up with hydrogen and oxygen gases. It's called electrolysis and it's been known for over a century. That's where almost all of the world's molecular hydrogen (H2) comes from.

    Virtually all tap water is naturally ionized. That is, it contains dissolved ions such as Na+, Ca++, Mg++ (and enough Cl-, F-, and other anions to keep the mix neutral). As for ionizing the water molecules themselves, they do that all by their selves. When water molecules are tired of being H2O, they get together with other H2O's and make an OH- and an H3O+. Meanwhile, elsewhere in your Waterworld, the ionized H3O+ and OH- are tired of being different so they combine back into a couple waters. This happens spontaneously and continually in any body of water.
     
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  11. sstorch

    sstorch New Member

    if you were to enlighten yourself by actually growing crops with potentized or vortexed water you would see the results and begin to understand what it is you are attempting to talk about. i have been doing tis for twenty five years. if we understand the anomalous properties of water; like how it contracts to the temperature of 38ºf and then begins to expand and how the dipole nature of the hydrogen bond can change from 62º to 120º when the water passes through a vortex, you would begin to understand the deeper nature of water and its capabilities. I suggest looking into the work of viktor schauberger, rudolf steiner's suggestion to 'stir' the biodynamic field sprays and the work of Masuru Emoto. Water running through a straight pipe is deadened; like your tap water. Water running in rivers and mountain streams is structured and clustered. if you cannot drink it and tell the difference you have had too much dead water and you will be next.
    sstorch
     
  12. Sausalito

    Sausalito Active Member

    Oh my. Ominous end note there.
    On Masuru Emoto:
    http://www.redorbit.com/news/science/1144934/masaru_emotos_wonderful_world_of_water/

    Excerpt:
    What do you mean by "potentized"? As by the process used in homeopathy? I was unaware that the placebo effect worked on corn...

    Edit: Oh snap. Here's this:
    https://www.metabunk.org/threads/em...alleged-effect-of-human-intent-on-matter.498/
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2013
  13. solrey

    solrey Senior Member

    Water expanding when frozen is not "anomalous". When water freezes, the water molecules form hexagonal crystals.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/chemical/waterdens.html

    My apologies, but when someone gets such basic science wrong, I have a hard time believing anything they say.
     
  14. Gazmik

    Gazmik New Member

    At 27 megahertz, the RF is non-ionizing. How do you "charge" water without ionizing it? To ionize water molecules, you need photon energies of 33 electronvolts or higher. That would mean a wavelength of 37.6 nanometers or shorter, which would be in the extreme ultraviolet spectrum. The wavelength of the RF that they use would be around 11 meters, in the CB radio spectrum in the US.

    The effects of the RF would be thermal, and it doesn't appear that the equipment would generate enough power to even do a significant amount of that.
     
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  15. Jazzy

    Jazzy Closed Account

    They should get together with that "free energy" Irish company and do it for free, then. Er, where did that go? Oops, sorry...
     
  16. Jazzy

    Jazzy Closed Account

    UV water sterilizers spring to mind. Aren't they a normal industrial product?
     
  17. David Fraser

    David Fraser Senior Member

    What happens if we play Radio 3 to the water?
     
  18. Gazmik

    Gazmik New Member

    I know that you can buy consumer UV water filters.

    From the Vi-Aqua web page:

    The Vi-Aqua system works by altering the natural surface charge of suspended particles and acts to modify the Zeta potential. The negative charge, induced by the applied signal, enhances the stability of the suspension by means of increased electrostatic repulsion between particles. This is due to the resultant double layer of ions that surround particles and vessel/pipe surfaces which are in contact with the water.

    The modified "zeta-potential" facilitates improved hydration of solids and reduced surface tension of the water, thus creating the Benefits that will be see in your grass or crop.
     
  19. Jazzy

    Jazzy Closed Account

    The question was rhetorical.

    I know you can buy industrial and consumer UV water sterilizers.
     
  20. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

    And how would UV energy yield better quality water? Other than the fact that it would effectively be sterile.
     
  21. Jazzy

    Jazzy Closed Account

    There you have it. Rhetorical. What's a UV filter, Gazmik?
     
    Last edited: Sep 4, 2013
  22. Dan Wilson

    Dan Wilson Active Member

    Just clarifying that there is nothing along the lines of what is claimed in the article in question going on when water is exposed to UV light.
     
  23. Jazzy

    Jazzy Closed Account

    You get a better class of bug.
     
  24. Gazmik

    Gazmik New Member

    I'm not claiming that it does yield better quality water. I doubt it would. I was just pointing out that the 11 meter wavelength 27 MHz RF that they claim alters the charge would be incapable of ionizing water molecules because of the fact that it doesn't have the photon energy that is required.
     
  25. CCPchemprof

    CCPchemprof New Member

    I just looked up Professor Austin Darragh of Limerick University at the Limerick U website. He has published over 100 papers, but none more recently that the early 1990's. Also none on any topic related to the recent claim regarding radio-frequency treated water. So I too am very skeptical of this new claim touting the agricultural benefits of this so-called treatment.