1. Omer Puskul

    Omer Puskul New Member

    Hello to everyone. I have a question. Flat earthers do an experiment called the radio waves experiment in a fake science documentary called Convex Earth.They claimed that the antenna, which was broadcasting at a frequency of 5800 mHz and 1.5 meters above sea level, could not be transmitted to another antenna, which is 1.5 meters above sea level, 14.2 kilometers away from the curvature of the earth. But in their experiment, they said that the connection between the two antennas was ensured.
    I'm talking about the radio wave experiment going through this video between 0:14:23 - 0:16:08 and 0:42:06 - 0:48:26:

    Source: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=McdMMmclGVc


    In addition, technical information about the experiment, this video is told between 0:05:20 - 0:06:23 minutes:

    Source: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eA793A1vnW4


    What is the scientific explanation of this claim? Thanks in advance for your answers.
     
  2. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    Refraction.
    https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Communication_Systems/Wave_Propagation#Refraction
     
  3. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    Using the simple equation in wikipedia:
    Metabunk 2019-04-13 13-02-48.

    sqrt(17*1.5)*2 = 10km. So factoring in "a dramatic effect" it seems quite plausible to get 15km.
     
  4. Omer Puskul

    Omer Puskul New Member

    Thanks for your reply :)
     
  5. Nth

    Nth Member

    There are two things about this test which kind of rub me the wrong way, both of which may have perfectly innocent explanations. First, the data screen showed at 5:45 in the second video notes an "ACK/Distance" of only 1.4 kilometers. Does that refer to the point-to-point distance, i.e. something that could be attained by syncing the clocks of the two stations, attaching a timestamp to the transmitting packet, and measuring the difference between that timestamp and when the second machine received the signal? Or is it something else entirely?

    Second, that same data screen records a date of "2009-09-25", which contradicts information stated at 5:24 saying that the experiment was carried out in 2011.

    I don't know, maybe I'm being a bit too much of a "conspiracy theorist" type. ;)
     
  6. Mick West

    Mick West Administrator Staff Member

    The whole video has always seemed rather suspect to me, which is why, when it came out I posted this:

     
  7. Omer Puskul

    Omer Puskul New Member

    The video already contains a lot of contradictions in itself. For example, They say 1 meter for the height of the radio antennas above sea level in the main video, but they say height of the radio antennas above sea level is 1.5 meters in the technical data video.
     
  8. Nth

    Nth Member

    I'm generally inclined to agree with your assessment. While I don't want to engage in some sort of "poisoning the well" fallacy, there appears to be quite the rabbit hole to go down related to Urandir Fernandes de Oliviera, the guy behind this "documentary", predominantly related to his operation of something like a UFO cult as well as a fictional alien named Bilu.

    They ("Dakila Research", the organization head by de Oliviera) have also put out a press release referencing organizations, people, and awards that I cannot find any other references to online outside of, well, their press release. Case in point:

    Source: http://convexearth.org/news/the-bra...-peace-forces-honored-dakila-and-convex-earth

    I have yet to find independent confirmation of any "Brazilian Association of International Peace Forces of the United Nations" or an award remotely like "Medal Heroes of the Six-Day War". Granted, I'm a fellow in the U.S. trying to look up Brazilian government functions, but I can't even find a reference to some sort of Six-Day in any way connected with Brazil.

    It's a strange, opaque situation which sort of reminds me of a flat earth YouTuber named "Captain Obvious", real name Brett Salisbury, who published several books referring to an array of alleged experts whose existence I couldn't identify.

    Honestly, this post probably belong more in the "People Debunked" subforum.

    Edit: Writing error.